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School District Missed and Ignored Long List of Serious Problems With Youth ... - FlaglerLive.com

School District Missed and Ignored Long List of Serious Problems With Youth ... - FlaglerLive.com | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
School District Missed and Ignored Long List of Serious Problems With Youth ...
FlaglerLive.com
I was young and made a bad decision. I went on to play 4 years of basketball and improve myself.” On Sept.
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Is Education Broken? The Problem with US Standardized Testing in Public Schools | The Digital Media Diet

Is Education Broken? The Problem with US Standardized Testing in Public Schools | The Digital Media Diet | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” ~ Nelson Mandela

 

Last night Jayne Clare from TeachersWithApps held their EdAppTalk on Facebook to discuss standardized testing in US schools for 2nd-11th graders, based on their recent post, “Isn’t it TIME to Stand Up Against Standardized Testing?” It made me realize it is also time for me share my concerns and why I would like to see test reform in our schools as soon as possible. I have come to the realization that it will require real protest from parents and will be opting my own child out of testing when he enters 2nd grade next year. While this is not a typical ‘digital media’ topic, it does impact everything happening in the world of education and apps.


Via Carisa Kluver
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Carisa Kluver's curator insight, April 26, 2013 1:27 PM

An explanation of why I plan to 'opt out' my child from standardized testing ...

Meleny Weber's curator insight, October 14, 2013 4:30 PM

I chose this blog entry mainly because of the picture/diagram with facts about standardized testing.  The blog entry is written by a mother who has who has done her research, and who has participated in several online discussion boards with other parents and teachers.  She is against the idea of standardized testing, not testing all together, but she hates the way it is implemented in today’s classrooms. Overall she pretty much agrees with everyone else out there. She believes that students should be tested on more than just the typical analytical questions. It only really shows a fraction of the student’s knowledge and learning capability. Oddly enough, she uses the same metaphor, relating the students to guinea pigs, as the other article I wrote about does. This shows the a very wide variety of people, from different backgrounds and ages feel that standardized testing is absolutely not an adequate way to identify how intelligent a student is. She writes in her blog that she does not want her children to have to go through the standardized testing. I am curious as to how she is going to get around that. Perhaps, she will remove her child from public schools and enter them into a private institution with the same beliefs about testing. Maybe she could send her child to a place that practices un-schooling, a type of school that is very free, and lets the students learn whatever they want however they want. The sad part is that most of the administrators and teachers in public schools across the nation do not agree with standardized tests either. We still make students take them because there is not a better method out there.

The diagram commands the readers’ attention right away with its layout and bright colors. While it does not have any hardcore statistics and numbers, it has eight different reasons why standardized tests are not good. One reason that I have not seen in other articles is the fact that test scores can vary from day to day. A student can be having a very bad day and as a result do poorly on the test that he or she would have otherwise done well on. The room the test is given in could be very cold, and therefore could be a distraction to the test-takers. Another reason standardized tests are bad is that the tests are not subjective. There are people that write the questions, and choose the “correct” answer. On many exams there is a question that asks to choose the “best” answer. What if the best answer to a student is different from the best answer according to the test writer? These are only two of many reasons why a standardized test is a poor measurement of one’s knowledge. The thing that confuses me is why nobody has thought of a new plan instead of the continuing to hand out tests that help nobody. Something needs to change, and it should not be solely up to the students. Everyone needs to work together and help the future kids. Maybe when I am a teacher I will see a different view of standardized testing. 

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A bad idea in DC on school reform — and a sharp response - Washington Post (blog)

A bad idea in DC on school reform — and a sharp response - Washington Post (blog) | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
A bad idea in DC on school reform — and a sharp response
Washington Post (blog)
My colleague Emma Brown reported in this story that David Catania, the chairman of the D.C.
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Cursive writing at risk in U.S. schools

Cursive writing at risk in U.S. schools | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
Not far from State Sen. Jean Leising's Capitol office is a museum that prominently displays documents penned by Abraham Lincoln. It's a favorite educ (A problem, or inevitable? Cursive writing at risk in U.S.
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NRA's School Security Plan Cites Phony Shooting

NRA's School Security Plan Cites Phony Shooting | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
The gun lobby's report presents as evidence a recent school massacre—that doesn't exist. (RT @MotherJones: The @NRA's plan for arming schools cites a massacre as evidence, but there's one little problem: It never happened.
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Applaud Schools for Implementing Alternatives to Zero Tolerance ...

Applaud Schools for Implementing Alternatives to Zero Tolerance ... | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
Thankfully, schools across four states have implemented new alternatives to zero-tolerance rules by allowing students to talk about their problems with their peers and teachers. Commend these districts for their progressive discipline ...
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Today in bad ideas: Missouri's 'Don't Get Sick' bill | Midwest Voices

Today in bad ideas: Missouri's 'Don't Get Sick' bill | Midwest Voices | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
Cookson is sponsoring House Bill 1040. It is short and self-explanatory: “School age children of welfare recipients must attend public school, unless physically disabled, at least ninety percent of the time in order to receive benefits.” In other...
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Land of School Cheaters and Final Four Suggests Need for Game ...

Land of School Cheaters and Final Four Suggests Need for Game ... | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
The Atlanta-Journal Constitution, which deserves a Pulitzer for its work revealing the "Atlanta School Cheating Scandal," as it is now known, chronicled a day in the life of their town through its usual "Metro Section" reports of Thursday, ...
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A Bad Situation Getting Worse | New Woodburn Community School

A Bad Situation Getting Worse | New Woodburn Community School | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
Day 1 of the new school, Eastwood, on the Mileground was met with a “wreck” on the Mileground between a car and school bus, a wreck that was responded to by multiple fire trucks. Fortunately no one was injured, reportedly.
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The Secret To Fixing Bad Schools | NY Times

The Secret To Fixing Bad Schools | NY Times | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it

By David L. Kirp

 

"WHAT would it really take to give students a first-rate education? Some argue that our schools are irremediably broken and that charter schools offer the only solution. The striking achievement of Union City, N.J. — bringing poor, mostly immigrant kids into the educational mainstream — argues for reinventing the public schools we have.

 

"Union City makes an unlikely poster child for education reform. It’s a poor community with an unemployment rate 60 percent higher than the national average. Three-quarters of the students live in homes where only Spanish is spoken. A quarter are thought to be undocumented, living in fear of deportation.

 

"Public schools in such communities have often operated as factories for failure. This used to be true in Union City, where the schools were once so wretched that state officials almost seized control of them. How things have changed. From third grade through high school, students’ achievement scores now approximate the statewide average. What’s more, in 2011, Union City boasted a high school graduation rate of 89.5 percent — roughly 10 percentage points higher than the national average. Last year, 75 percent of Union City graduates enrolled in college, with top students winning scholarships to the Ivies."


Via Jim Lerman
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Teachers pack heat at gun school - dispatch.com

Teachers pack heat at gun school - dispatch.com | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it

"A shooter is loose in the school. Vulnerable staff members cry for help as the gunman stands close and shoots them all. Even the good guy with a gun, who was supposed to keep everyone safe, doesn’t make it out alive....

 

... In role play, the “good guys” use model Airsoft guns to shoot plastic pellets at other participants who are playing the “bad guys.” The scenarios are set in common spaces in schools, such as hallways and auditoriums, as well as in more-enclosed spaces such as offices.

 

David Bowie, an instructor at the institute, said the pellets from the guns hurt, which raises stress levels and results in better responses in a more-heightened reality.

 

Angie, a substitute teacher from northeast Ohio, agreed and said it’s valuable.

 

“You can walk through a scenario, you know, just mapping it out a hundred times, and it’s not going to be as memorable,” she said...."

 


Via Thumpy Covey
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Thumpy Covey's curator insight, March 28, 2013 12:40 PM

AIRSOFT is a valuable training tool.  Said it once, said it a thousand times...and these teachers are finding out first hand.  Sounds kinda expensive, but we're not about to second-guess the presenters on costs...and this is NOT the only course doing this.  Others are in your state right now.  Do a GOOGLE Search and find one near you...

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The Real Problem With Law Schools: Too Many Lawyers

The Real Problem With Law Schools: Too Many Lawyers | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
A crisis is looming in legal education. Last month, a notable group of legal educators who call themselves the Coalition of Concerned Colleagues released a letter declaring that law schools have spewed forth more graduates than the legal market can...
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Chicago Parents and Schools Trapped in a Bad Relationship - Huffington Post (blog)

Chicago Parents and Schools Trapped in a Bad Relationship - Huffington Post (blog) | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
Chicago Parents and Schools Trapped in a Bad Relationship
Huffington Post (blog)
The Chicago Public Schools and I are locked in this weird relationship drama.
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9 Investigates: Some parents say shortage of nurses in schools is serious problem - WSOC Charlotte

9 Investigates: Some parents say shortage of nurses in schools is serious problem - WSOC Charlotte | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
9 Investigates: Some parents say shortage of nurses in schools is serious problem
WSOC Charlotte
A 9 investigation is exposing what some parents call a serious problem -- a shortage of nurses inside schools.
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Thomas C. Pedroni: Who grades the Detroit Public Schools emergency manager?

Thomas C. Pedroni: Who grades the Detroit Public Schools emergency manager? | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
If we were to construct a report card for the emergency management of the Detroit Public Schools since it began in 2009, what would it include?
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Stanford's Rice says declining schools pose a national security threat

Stanford's Rice says declining schools pose a national security threat | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
Condoleezza Rice says failing schools undermine economic growth, competitiveness, social cohesion and the ability to fill positions in institutions vital to national security. (One thing both sides can agree on...
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Norfolk program centers on middle school behavior - Hampton Roads

Norfolk program centers on middle school behavior - Hampton Roads | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
Behavior was spelled out in an independent report last fall as one of several factors that lead to poor student performance in Norfolk schools, considered among the worst in the state. While the positive behavior philosophy ...
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Early school leavers' strategy on the way - timesofmalta.com

Early school leavers' strategy on the way - timesofmalta.com | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
I still think that the root problem lies with the high standards set by our primary school curriculum and the fact that it is based too much on knowledge cramming. Those not so academically inclined, who may have fantastic ...
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Schoolcuts.org: Open Data and Civil Discourse

Schoolcuts.org: Open Data and Civil Discourse | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it

Last week, Chicago Public Schools announced that it was closing 61 schools due to budget constraints. Even before the list was announced, the plan to shut down schools was and still is generating lots of heated debate.

CPS has released data on each school, but it isn’t always organized in a way that makes it easy for parents to see what is going on at the school. To find out information on the school utilization, you would first visit a separate 19 page PDF file to see how CPS determines utilization. You then have to download an excel file and search through it to find the school you are interested in. This is a particularly thorny problem for parents and community members who care deeply about their schools as community anchors.

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Not Too Much Testing, Just Bad Testing - The Washington Monthly

Not Too Much Testing, Just Bad Testing - The Washington Monthly | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
The school cheating revelations are a problem for school evaluation advocates. It's hard to argue that standardized testing is improving education as long as Americans keep hearing that teachers are dishonest.
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Charter School Report: the bad ones stay bad and the good ones stay good

Charter School Report: the bad ones stay bad and the good ones stay good | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON -- When it comes to charter schools, the bad ones stay bad and the good ones stay good, according to a report on charter school growth released by an influential group of Stanford University scholars on Wednesday.


Via Bob Farrace
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Cops Nab 5-Year-Old for Wearing Wrong Color Shoes to School--Liberal School Insanity

Cops Nab 5-Year-Old for Wearing Wrong Color Shoes to School--Liberal School Insanity | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it
Have Mississippi's disciplinary tactics gotten out of control?

 

In Mississippi, if kindergarteners violate the dress code or act out in class, they may end up in the back of a police car.

A story about one five-year-old particularly stands out. The little boy was required to wear black shoes to school. Because he didn’t have black shoes, his mom used a marker to cover up his white and red sneakers. A bit of red and white were still noticeable, so the child was taken home by the cops.

The child was escorted out of school so he and his mother would be taught a lesson.

Ridiculous? Perhaps. But incidents such as this are happening across Mississippi. A new report, “Handcuffs on Success: The Extreme School Discipline Crisis in Mississippi Public Schools,” exposes just how bad it’s become.

Released on January 17, the report is a joint project between state chapters of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and the Mississippi Coalition for the Prevention of Schoolhouse to Jailhouse and the Advancement Project.

The report examined more than 100 school districts and claimed that black students are affected by harsh disciplinary actions at a much greater rate than their white peers. It notes that “for every one white student who is given an out-of-school suspension, three black students are suspended, even though black students comprise just half of the student population.”

Carlos McCray, an associate professor at Fordham University Graduate School of Education in the Education Leadership Administration Program, says, “Research has shown that students who are subjected to multiple suspensions and expulsions are more likely to drop out of school. And we all know where this leads."

The report cited several examples of unfair disciplinary measures, including the story of the child with the "black" shoes. Other incidents include:

• Students on a school bus were throwing peanuts at one another. Because one of the peanuts hit the female bus driver, five black male high school students were arrested on felony assault charges.

• A student was sent to a juvenile detention center for wearing the wrong color socks. It was considered to be a probation violation from a previous fight.

Kelly Welch, an associate professor in sociology and criminal justice at Villanova University, said that zero-tolerance policies are often harsher in schools with large minority student populations.


Via littlebytesnews
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littlebytesnews's curator insight, February 15, 2013 3:25 AM

I don't think it's about race as this aritcle tries to make it....many liberal schools have lost all common sense. Kids are being suspended and shamed for simple things like bringing toy guns to school or making paper shapes that look like guns or playing imaginary childhood games like cops and robbers. It's at a point where schools are so afraid of reality that they have lost their own sense of reality.

Kids need to know imaginary play is ok and while bringing toys to school may not be allowed, they shouldn't be suspended for playing with them as they are intended. You can't 'threaten' someone's life with a toy gun or bubble gun. 

The zero-tolerance policies in some schools are out of control. Hopefully as more parents complain more schools will resconsider their policies and discipline appropriately. 

As the article says...“Zero-tolerance policies were originally designed to protect students from individuals who pose a threat on school grounds. Instead, they are being used to send children home for trivial things that should be solved in the principal’s office.”

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Common Core Online Tests to Pose Tech. Challenge for Rural Schools

Common Core Online Tests to Pose Tech. Challenge for Rural Schools | School Gone Bad | Scoop.it

The Common Core State Standards eventually will require students to take standardized tests online, and that will pose a problem for many schools, especially those in rural areas.

 

Why? Rural schools often lack the technology and broadband capabilities of their counterparts in more populated areas.

 

The Common Core State Standards have been adopted by 45 states, and two groups of states—thePartnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Career and the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium— are developing tests.

 

Both groups say they are committed to helping states transition to computer testing, and they have developed a Technology Readiness Tool to help states identify infrastructure gaps and plan for future needs.


Via Deb Gardner
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Deb Gardner's curator insight, April 3, 2013 8:47 AM

What's much more troubling than the realization that rural schools may not have technology resources to adequately be tested is that they don't have the technology resources for their students to optimize learning.


Adequate bandwidth and devices to hit the Internet go a long way in giving students a much deeper, rigorous and individualized learning experience particularly when the Common Core are implemented.


And I'm not talking about a school's 1:1 iPad deployment.  A pod of 5 Chromebooks (at $250/device), an adequate Internet connection and a tech savvy, well planned teacher in every classroom will go a long way. #notkidding