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Rescooped by Ana Rosales from Leading Schools
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15 Class Discussion Strategies: NOT "just a conversation between the teacher and a handful of extroverted students"

15 Class Discussion Strategies: NOT "just a conversation between the teacher and a handful of extroverted students" | School | Scoop.it

Here they are: 15 formats for structuring a class discussion to make it more engaging, more organized, more equitable, and more academically challenging. [...]


Every time I saw it in a lesson plan, I would add a  note: “What format will you use? What questions will you ask? How will you ensure that all students participate?” I was pretty sure that We will discuss actually meant the teacher would do most of the talking; He would throw out a couple of questions like “So what did you think about the video?” or “What was the theme of the story?” and a few students would respond, resulting in something that looked  like a discussion, but was ultimately just a conversation between the teacher and a handful of extroverted students; a classic case of Fisheye Teaching.

The problem wasn’t them; in most of the classrooms where they’d sat as students, that’s exactly what a class discussion looked like. They didn’t know any other “formats.” I have only ever been familiar with a few myself. But when teachers began contacting me recently asking for a more comprehensive list, I knew it was time to do some serious research.


Via Mel Riddile
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Shelly Reckow VanVoorst's curator insight, October 25, 2015 4:23 PM

I scooped this article because I found it to be a good reference to hand out when I write on a teacher's lesson plan, what will the discussion look like?  This article goes beyond the over used think-pair-share, and instead works through ones that require planning to those that can be done with little prep beforehand.  I hope that teachers will utilize the discussion strategies highlighted within this article, and vary the ones that they use on a regular basis to keep students engaged, and to also increase the thinking that student are doing on the subject at hand.

Angela McCord's curator insight, April 12, 2017 11:30 AM
"We will discuss actually meant the teacher would do most of the talking," rings true in so many classrooms. Great guide to begin generating meaningful classroom discussions!
 
Rescooped by Ana Rosales from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Bloom's Taxonomy in the Flipped Classroom

Bloom's Taxonomy in the Flipped Classroom | School | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Pepi Kotsalis's curator insight, July 1, 2014 10:52 AM

Yes! Flipping Bloom's taxonomy places importance on CREATING and that memorizing is necessary but to a lesser degree.

Deirdre Bonnycastle's curator insight, July 2, 2014 3:12 PM

An infographic of what belongs in the classroom and what belongs outside

Rescooped by Ana Rosales from School
Scoop.it!

Bloom's Taxonomy in the Flipped Classroom

Bloom's Taxonomy in the Flipped Classroom | School | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Ana Rosales
more...
Pepi Kotsalis's curator insight, July 1, 2014 10:52 AM

Yes! Flipping Bloom's taxonomy places importance on CREATING and that memorizing is necessary but to a lesser degree.

Deirdre Bonnycastle's curator insight, July 2, 2014 3:12 PM

An infographic of what belongs in the classroom and what belongs outside