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Bibliometrics as a Tool for Literature Review - Bridging Sciences

Bibliometrics as a Tool for Literature Review - Bridging Sciences | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Bibliometrics as a Tool for Literature Review
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Oskar Almazan's curator insight, January 25, 2017 10:58 PM
Literature review can be a tedious process. With so many articles to read, new researchers in a field can find themselves stuck, trying to stay on top of all the readings required. In an effort to streamline the process, bibliometrics can be a powerful tool to make the article selection more efficient, adding a visual component to it.
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Trump's budget director pick: "Do we really need government-funded research at all"

Trump's budget director pick: "Do we really need government-funded research at all" | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Mick Mulvaney suggested Zika science is uncertain, so we shouldn’t bother to fund it.
Karen R. Harker's insight:
Gulp.
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A Peek Inside the Strange World of Fake Academia

A Peek Inside the Strange World of Fake Academia | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Sham scholarly publications and academic conferences without rigor reflect a legitimate problem: too many Ph.D.-holders chasing too few credentials.
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Open access: All human knowledge is there—so why can’t everybody access it?

Open access: All human knowledge is there—so why can’t everybody access it? | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
We paid for the research with taxes, and Internet sharing is easy. What's the hold-up?
Karen R. Harker's insight:
A long read...hate to say it, but I'm printing this out so I can read it more leisurely.
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PaperHive – a coworking hub for researchers that aims to make reading more collaborative.

PaperHive – a coworking hub for researchers that aims to make reading more collaborative. | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Managing research material in the digital age is still a widely inefficient process. Alexander Naydenov, co-founder of PaperHive, looks at how this web platform could transform reading into a more …
Karen R. Harker's insight:
Is this yet another personal library manager?  Or part of the evolution of scholarly communication?
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How Much Should Scientists Check Other Scientists' Work? - Wall Street Journal

How Much Should Scientists Check Other Scientists' Work? - Wall Street Journal | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
A debate is growing in the research world over the value of replicating older, peer-reviewed studies.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

Replicating studies is under-appreciated in the academic world.  However, it is especially needed with social & psychological studies where there can be so many variables that are impossible to control for in any one study.  The more the hypotheses are tested, the more we can learn.

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Guest Post: HighWire’s John Sack on Online Indexing of Scholarly Publications: Part 1, What We All Have Accomplished

Guest Post: HighWire’s John Sack on Online Indexing of Scholarly Publications: Part 1, What We All Have Accomplished | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
HighWire's John Sack looks at the changes that search engine indexing has driven for discovery of research publications. Part 1 of a two part series covering Anurag Acharya's recent ALPSP keynote address.
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Open Science Revolution – New Ways of Publishing Research in The Digital Age - Scicasts (press release) (blog)

Scicasts (press release) (blog) Open Science Revolution – New Ways of Publishing Research in The Digital Age Scicasts (press release) (blog) Here is a handful of examples, implemented by three companies – a recently launched open access journal...
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Google, Twitter and Publishers Seek Faster Web

Google, Twitter and Publishers Seek Faster Web | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
The goal is to develop a universal standard for publishers — one that could be used to load articles more quickly wherever they appear.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

From my experience, it's the myriad of advertising that makes Web pages slow, not the content itself...except for videos.  It seems like the pages that take the longest to load are the ones with the most advertising.  The connections to these advertising sites are what take the longest.  The system they are proposing doesn't seem to help with that problem.

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Harvard University says it can't afford journal publishers' prices

Harvard University says it can't afford journal publishers' prices | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
University wants scientists to make their research open access and resign from publications that keep articles behind paywalls
Karen R. Harker's insight:

When Harvard, *Harvard*, can no longer afford journals, something is wrong!  This problem, however, is too difficult to solve by abandoning all subscription-based journals.  Gold Open Access is not sustainable because it merely  pushes the burden of the costs to the authors and/or funding agencies themselves, while Green OA won't work on a larger level because it *does cost* a certain amount to provide quality work.   Competition in the market could solve the problem of the high prices, which, after all, is what started the discussion in the first place.  But unrestricted capitalism, combined with a system of scientific production that is steaming out of control, has reduced competition and concentrated the market.  I do see a way out, though...IF libraries retain subscriptions to only the most cost-effective and sustainable journals, AND IF researchers refuse to collaborate with the least sustainable journals, AND IF professional societies insist on keeping their subscription fees low when contracting with publishers (or not selling their publishing off at all), then competition could be restored, and prices maintained at sustainable levels.  But I'm sure there are a myriad of other factors and impacts that such a solution would have.  It's a conundrum.

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Open for Business - Inside Higher Ed (blog)

Open for Business - Inside Higher Ed (blog) | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Open for Business
Inside Higher Ed (blog)
Basically, scientists want access to scientific research and these days even a well-funded institution can't afford all the journals where research of interest may be published.
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5 Aug Predatory publishers

Predatory publishers,” presented by Paula Callan, Scholarly communications Librarian, QUT and Stephanie Bradbury, Research Support Coordinator, QUT.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

OK, *this* is the long but interesting presentation on predatory publishing...But the other item is interesting too.

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Bibliometrics: Difference between revisions - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bibliometrics: Difference between revisions - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Bibliometrics was just edited by The Transhumanist http://t.co/gAx4ZCGgY7
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Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2017

Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2017 | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2017
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Gone in 2016: 10 Notable Women in Science and Technology

Gone in 2016: 10 Notable Women in Science and Technology | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
These scientists made important contributions to physics, biology, astronomy and more
Karen R. Harker's insight:
Vera Rubin was not the only woman scientist the world lost this year...
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Neither Fish Nor Fowl: Journal Publishing and the University Press

Neither Fish Nor Fowl: Journal Publishing and the University Press | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
University presses are not well positioned to thrive in journal publishing because they have not adopted any of the (relatively few and common) business strategies that are necessary, given market dynamics, for success.
Karen R. Harker's insight:
Finding where UP's fit in the world of scholarly communication.
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What do mathematicians think about their journals? Peer review quality tops list of stated issues

What do mathematicians think about their journals? Peer review quality tops list of stated issues | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Cameron Neylon (Curtin University), David Michael Roberts (University of Adelaide) and Mark C Wilson (University of Auckland) have conducted a large-scale survey of what mathematicians think of the…
Karen R. Harker's insight:
Interesting insights...while a single online survey should not be used to take direct action, it is a good indication of ideas for further research.
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Crowdsourced research: Many hands make tight work - Nature.com

Crowdsourced research: Many hands make tight work - Nature.com | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Crowdsourcing research can balance discussions, validate findings and better inform policy, say Raphael Silberzahn and Eric L. Uhlmann.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

One data set, many analysts can lead to a more balanced research...

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What is an Academic Journal?

What is an Academic Journal? | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
We spend much time these days wondering when the academic journal as we know it will cease to exist.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

This is in response to the "overlay journal" that essentially "publishes" articles from an open repository, which itself has no peer review and very limited  controls on quality.  Of course, those in support would say that post-publication peer review is the future, but I do believe that traditional publishers provide a filtering service.  I also see libraries serving a similar role, particularly to undergraduates, providing a selection of quality resources on the various topics for which their studies encompass.  

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Open Access in Iran: an Editor Q+A with Mohammad Abdollahi - BMC Blogs Network (blog)

Open Access in Iran: an Editor Q+A with Mohammad Abdollahi - BMC Blogs Network (blog) | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
BMC Blogs Network (blog)
Open Access in Iran: an Editor Q+A with Mohammad Abdollahi
BMC Blogs Network (blog)
... Q+A with Mohammad Abdollahi.
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Study finds huge increase in articles published by 'predatory' journals - Inside Higher Ed

Study finds huge increase in articles published by 'predatory' journals - Inside Higher Ed | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Study finds huge increase in articles published by 'predatory' journals Inside Higher Ed The rise of open-access publishing, combined with pressure on academics to get published, has caused a spectacular increase in the number of articles spewed...
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One future for journal publishing | Logic Matters

RT @PeterSmith: Breaking the stranglehold of commercial publishers: one possible future for journal publishing http://t.co/em9fU0SxG2
Karen R. Harker's insight:

I should have looked down my list of stories in my Scoop.it! before posting my previous entry.  Here is a very interesting solution:

 

(From the original article quoted in the story)

...rather than publishing, or even electronically hosting, papers, it will consist of a list of links to arXiv preprints. Other than that, the journal will be entirely conventional: authors will submit links to arXiv preprints, and then the editors of the journal will find referees, using their quick opinions and more detailed reports in the usual way in order to decide which papers will be accepted. … [So] The articles will be peer-reviewed in the traditional way. There will also be a numbering system for the articles, so that when they are cited, they look like journal articles rather than “mere” arXiv preprints. They will be exclusive to Discrete Analysis (the journal).


Now, in case you don't know, arXiv is among the oldest and most prolific Open Access repository of papers.  It was started in the pre-Web neonatal-Internet days (remember FTP and Gopher?).  The focus of the papers are physics and mathematics, and the result is a huge and rich source of research.  While not technically peer-reviewed, the repository has a collaborative quality-control system that relies on volunteers to re-classify and remove irrelevant papers.  While there are some problems inherent with this system, it is arguably the most successful of these attempts.  


So now, why not take advantage of this rich and organized resource to do what journals do best - providing the best and most relevant articles for their readers.  That is what readers want - a filter that ensures quality and relevance.  It keeps the archive intact, so as not to censor research, but provides that filter to make it easier to stay up-to-date with the latest work.  


But...this will still cost something to maintain.  For this journal, they are relying first on Oxford University to pay some of the costs, but they are seeking additional funding.  And it's a system that is vulnerable to corruption - what will keep a publisher from exploiting this system and charging the same exorbitant prices the worst currently charge.   How to keep costs low but sustainable?

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A Scientific Look at Bad Science - The Atlantic

A Scientific Look at Bad Science - The Atlantic | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Recent research about fraud, errors, and other dismaying academic problems
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What counts as an academic publication?

What counts as an academic publication? | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
What is it that sets academic publications apart from articles on The Conversation? Peer review might be your first answer.

Via Hege Folkestad
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What to believe in the new world of open access publishing - The Conversation AU

What to believe in the new world of open access publishing - The Conversation AU | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Just as no one ever assumed that everything in print was trustworthy, neither should that be the case for open access content.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

Long but interesting presentation & discussion of the issue of "predatory" vs. "quality" scholarly publishing.  

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