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The Urban Landscape: Designing With Cities, Not For Them

The Urban Landscape: Designing With Cities, Not For Them | scatol8® | Scoop.it
When the city is viewed not as a destination for design but as the source material for it, a new relationship between design and the urban landscape is possible.

Whether it’s repurposing a billboard to act as a humidity collection system for clean drinking water in Lima, Peru, or integrating Wi-Fi capabilities into Madrid’s paving stones with the iPavement initiative, cities are increasingly expanding the capabilities of their existing assets and reforming the urban terrain as a landscape of opportunity.


The truth is that a city has all the resources it needs; the key to unlocking these resources is seeing the urban landscape not as the end result of a previous creative process, but as the beginning of a new one—a landscape to design with, not for.


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Minimalist Gottshalden House Blending With The Green Surroundings

Minimalist Gottshalden House Blending With The Green Surroundings | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Overlooking Lake Zürich, in Winterthur, Switzerland, the Gottshalden House is a relaxing three-storey home.


The house’s exterior is all covered in timber cladding. Located in a tranquil and quiet site and surrounded by a beautiful green scenery, the picturesque home was designed by Rossetti + Wyss Architekten. The simple, angular dream-like house integrates perfectly into the landscape, unveiling a breezy and uncluttered interior.

The L-shaped floor plan boasts oak plank ceilings and flush-mounted windows that offer framed views of the surroundings. Wood is the main material used to define the interior, which is well-ventilated and flooded with light.


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Keven Holt's curator insight, July 15, 2013 2:08 PM

Here's a great house design. But, then again, I've always loved minalist design. 

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Geometric Inspiration + Green Building: Taiwan's Zero-Carbon Swallows Nest

Geometric Inspiration + Green Building: Taiwan's Zero-Carbon Swallows Nest | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Taking inspiration from a geometric möbius strip, architect Vincent Callebaut has designed an impressive new building for Taiwan's Taichung gateway park.


The Swallows Nest's form starts out with a triangle that is then rotated around an elipse. Reaching a height of eight-stories, the building will house shops, cafes, and an "endless patio" which opens up into the park and is found in the center of the structure. It will host a variety of art within the many interior galleries.

The Swallows Nest also features various eco-friendly features. The undulating roof will have a number of solar panels attached to it, while the building's glass construction allows for natural light to enter. Three vertical gardens are found in the park's center, with one at each arched entrance. Most impressively, there will be continued efforts to make the Swallows Nest a zero carbon emissions structure.


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Valerina's comment, June 29, 2013 2:43 PM
Nice :) Please follow me on Instagram :D : volletu
Hotels in Stansted's comment, July 1, 2013 11:21 AM
what a lovely building.. reminds me the Bird's NEst Beijing National Olympic Stadium..
Joram Walukamba's comment, July 3, 2013 7:48 AM
Love the exterior. I wonder how the interior would look like considering the thematic principles, creativity and artistic beauty of the design ... curious!!!
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Budapest Students Design Sustainable House for Indoor and Outdoor Living

Budapest Students Design Sustainable House for Indoor and Outdoor Living | scatol8® | Scoop.it

It may look unassuming, but this sleek black box is the culmination of a two-year long collaboration of more than 50 students from 7 different faculties of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics.


Initially envisioned by two architecture students and built for the European Solar Decathlon 2012 in Madrid, the goal of Odooproject was to encourage a new sustainable life by designing a house where as much time as possible can be spent outdoors.

Odoo’s square plan has two primary elements: the north half enclosure and the south half outdoor terrace, bordered by the ‘summer wall’ to the south. The design allows comfortable living inside or outside throughout the year as the seasons allow.

To provide a comfortable environment, as efficiently as possible, the house uses both active and passive systems. The compact form of Odoo reduces heat loss, while its organization means it has two south-facing facades. The glass façade exploits solar gain, to heat the interior during the winter, and the solar panels on the ‘summer wall’ generate power from the summer sun...


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Mercor's curator insight, February 8, 2013 6:26 AM

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bancoideas's curator insight, February 8, 2013 10:22 AM
Ideas para mejorar la vida
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Kengo Kuma’s Modern Interpretation of an 800-Year-Old Japanese Hut

Kengo Kuma’s Modern Interpretation of an 800-Year-Old Japanese Hut | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Kengo Kuma’s version of the humble dwelling is a transparent temporary shelter dubbed “Hojoan 800 years later” and it is currently on display at Kyoto’s Shigamo Shrine.

This modernized version of Buddhist monk Kamono Chomei’s portable hut immortalized centuries ago in the influential essay ”Hojo-ki” (“An Account of My Hut”).  ”Hojo-an After 800 Years,” on display at Kyoto’s Shimogamo Jinja Shrine, is a tribute to Chomei’s efficient home, often regarded as a prototype for Japan’s compact housing. Reflecting the mobility of the original structure, Kuma’s hut is constructed of ETFE sheets that can easily be rolled up. Working in combination with a cedar structure and powerful magnets, the soft architecture becomes a single, more structured unit.


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Seven Mico-Living Proposals From The adAPT NYC Competition

Seven Mico-Living Proposals From The adAPT NYC Competition | scatol8® | Scoop.it

A gallery of studios and apartmentlets of the future, submitted for New York City’s adAPT competition.


The winning submission, My Micro NYC, by nARCHITECTS, Monadnock Development LLC, and the Actors Fund Housing Development Corporation, will be  developed on a site on East 27th Street in Manhattan. The structure will include multi-purpose spaces, lounges, and even an attic garden, providing luxuries not typically associated with efficiency apartments while encouraging interaction among neighbors. But while a lot of attention has been given to the winning proposal, there were actually 33 entries in total, a record within the Housing and Preservation Department.

We’ve collected a few of the other submissions for your viewing...


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Norm Miller's comment, March 3, 2013 1:53 PM
You mean Micro .....
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Cargotecture – the Rise of Recycling Shipping Containers

Cargotecture – the Rise of Recycling Shipping Containers | scatol8® | Scoop.it

One man’s trash is said to be another man’s treasure, and now old cargo shipping containers are rapidly becoming sought-after treasure in the architecture industry.


The term cargotecture, coined in 2005 by HyBrid Architecture, is used to describe any building partially or entirely built from recycled ISO shipping containers. It may seem strange that such a simple, aesthetically-unappealing box could be so loved by modern architects, but the increased use of reclaimed materials in architecture is starting to show no bounds.

In a world dominated by mass production, architects are being forced to find alternative ways of designing buildings that will make the smallest impact on the earth. Extending the life of discarded materials and saving salvageable items from landfill is a completely viable approach.

Shipping containers are resistant to fire, termites, hurricanes and earthquakes, proving themselves to be extremely resilient.

 

Somewhat like stacking blocks of Lego, steel or aluminum shipping containers are a perfectly strong building block...


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Pierre R Chantelois's comment, January 12, 2013 9:56 PM
Quelle excellente idée. Si les gouvernements pouvaient en réquisitionner quelques milliers, ils pourraient en faire don à Haïti pour accéler la mise à niveau de la qualité de vie de la population. Un 12 décembre, il y a trois ans...
oliviersc's comment, January 13, 2013 10:35 AM
Hélas, les bonnes idées ne sont pas rentables...
Natalie Curtis's curator insight, March 8, 2013 9:27 AM

I love that I've finally found the neologism for this type of architecture finally! Cargotecture is an upcoming trend in the architect's world and this article is actually one of the most brief and yet informative blogs I may have found in my short search, so far of these shipping container homes and buildings. The containers prove to be a very useful and easily moveable. They are in great abundance, which is fantastic since they are so often used for their resilience to fire, termites, hurricanes and earthquakes. So there's my answer finally to why these containers are becoming so popular amongst architects.

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Smart Cities + Green Megaprojects of the Future

Smart Cities + Green Megaprojects of the Future | scatol8® | Scoop.it

For many years, architects and city planners from around the world have been trying to create the green ideal: an entire city built to strict environmental standards- highly functional while still retaining aesthetic value.

 

Here’s a look at some green building and community design that caught our attention in recent months and may (or may not) become reality in the next several years. Their physical footprints may be large, but by using features such as wind power, solar, rainwater recycling and advanced air quality controls, their carbon footprints don't have to be...


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Mercor's curator insight, January 2, 2013 6:33 AM

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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 2, 2013 4:32 PM

This is going beyond Mazdar in Dubai.  The reality is that we need to transform existing cities since starting from scratch is rare.  We need to retrofit cities more than build new ones, but still it is interesting.

Alexandre Pépin's curator insight, March 4, 2013 6:31 AM

 

 10
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Low-Energy Bamboo House Blends into the Belgian Forest

Low-Energy Bamboo House Blends into the Belgian Forest | scatol8® | Scoop.it

With amenities such as a heat pump, radiant heating, rainwater collection and high-performance insulation, this modern bamboo-clad house by Belgian design firm AST 77 is as energy efficient as it is attractive.


Upending the stereotypical image of the flat countryside of Flanders, a new low energy house mixes modernism and organic materials to blend into a steep, forested hillside near Rotselaar, Belgium.

The chief exterior materials of are bamboo poles lined up in precise rows along the rectangular 86-foot-long steel-frame box, broken up by a series of square windows positioned for natural ventilation and passive solar.The overall visual effect is reminiscent of a tree trunk rising out of the hilly terrain...


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Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand

Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.


Architects Statement:

"Shoal Bay is a remote settlement on the rugged east coast of southern Hawkes Bay. The building is designed to be part of the rural setting, raised off the ground and sitting beside the original woolshed, which has served the bay since the early 1900's. The bach is rugged yet welcoming and offers unpretentious shelter, it is the type of place where you kick off your shoes and don't need to worry about walking sand through the house.
The bach is formed of two slightly off-set pavilions, one housing the bedrooms and the other the main living space. Decks are located at each end of the living pavilion allowing the sun to be followed throughout the day. Sliding screens at the north-west end provide adjustable shelter for the different wind conditions, offer privacy from neighbouring campers and act as walls for outside sleeping."


The sustainable, passive design features an interior spatial arrangement oriented for solar gain, shaded in the summer by the sliding shutters, which also provide shelter from the prevailing northwest winds. Also increasing the efficiency are high levels of insulation, along with solar panels that sit between the two pavilions...


Visit the link to view more images of this contemporary passive design that responds to its site and rural context...


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Mark Warren's curator insight, December 16, 2012 10:28 AM

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.

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Henning Larsen Architects: Low-energy office building in Denmark

Henning Larsen Architects: Low-energy office building in Denmark | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The new office building of Energinet.dk in Ballerup has achieved the lowest energy class possible by means of optimizing the design and geometry. The building has an annual energy consumption of only 47,7 kWh/m2. Incorporating solar panels, ground water cooling and heat pumps in the project would further reduce the annual energy consumption.

A flexible and easily comprehensible layout consists of three elements: meeting facilities on the ground floor, a uniting atrium and workstations on the top floor, which floats above the sloping landscape.

The atrium is identity-creating, open and active. A significant part of the environmental objective has been to ensure a high degree of flexibility. The open design as well as the light walls and simple, reusable elements will make it easy to change the interior layout in the future.

 

Visit the link to view more images of this low-energy design in Denmark...


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Modular Eco-resort Integrated into the Portuguese Landscape

Modular Eco-resort Integrated into the Portuguese Landscape | scatol8® | Scoop.it
Seven suspended micro-houses — each one resulting from a different combination of three modules — delicately hover above the ground in the Portuguese eco-resort of Parque de Pedras Salgadas.


Portuguese architects Luís Rebelo de Andrade and Diogo Aguiar have recently completed the set of houses in the north of Portugal. The small dwellings are suspended on pillars, completely integrated within the surrounding nature.

Designed in a modular, prefabricated system with different combinations of the same three modules — entrance/bathing, living, sleeping for an extremely flexible solution, able to adapt to diverse spaces within the park, creating different morphologies and diverse dialogues with the surrounding nature.

Each of the houses features a large window framing a specific view of the park, bringing the surrounding nature inside, and linking the interior to a balcony and ideal resting space. Each dwelling's cladding evokes local, vernacular construction techniques...


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Prefab Connected to the Land: House for Gudrun, Austria

Prefab Connected to the Land: House for Gudrun, Austria | scatol8® | Scoop.it

With a tight budget, focusing on the most necessary in terms of floor space and construction was essential for this residential project in Austria. The result is a two-room-apartment of prefabricated timber elements on a concrete foundation.

A large living space, two small bedrooms and the entrance are organized around a central core containing the bathroom and technical installations. Four large openings create unique views into the surrounding landscape. According to their orientation – private or public, varying in size and position, with or without parapet, each deeply cut opening has its own characteristic.

A large window to the west offering an idyllic view of the landscape and an entrance leading to the neighbors and outdoors. Sitting on the wooden terrace, the homeowner finds peace and nature, receiving regular visits of neighbors and even those from local rabbits, foxes and deer...


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Garoza House: A Modern, Modular Prefab Housing Prototype

Garoza House: A Modern, Modular Prefab Housing Prototype | scatol8® | Scoop.it

An industrialized modular housing prototype that allows growth and changes over time, with all systems installed without complex construction procedures.


Manufactured in specialized factories composing single complete units, including all the interior finishes, modules are the maximum size supported by conventional transport.

Interior partitions, storage and fixed furniture are incorporated to the vertical walls, which house highly qualified technical facilities, automation and electronic systems, tailored to the program for each configuration. The resulting collection provides quality, increased control with regard to construction scheduling, maintenance plans and offers flexibility for future growth. 


The principles of sustainable economy and the spirit of recycling guide and support all the project decisions.


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Jenny Morris's comment, July 16, 2013 11:23 PM
This reminds me of the Smart Home exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago...very cool!
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Town Square Initiative: New York - Urban Planning and Design Concepts

Town Square Initiative: New York - Urban Planning and Design Concepts | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The Town Square Initiative is a yearlong volunteer effort in which Gensler designers set out to unearth and re-imagine unexpected open space in cities around the globe. All 43 Gensler offices were invited to participate in the conceptual project, in which we challenged our designers to identify open space in the city and reimagine it as a town square.


Visit the link for more images, diagrams and information on Gensler New York’s design of their future city.


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The Non Program Pavilion by Jesús Torres García

The Non Program Pavilion by Jesús Torres García | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Located in Spain, near the Mediterranean Sea, this small pavilion is surrounded by a remarkable landscape. The construction is defined by the relation between the landscape and the structure on the field.


The structure developed itself as a flower, subscribing to Oscar Niemeyer’s approach. The whole project has been composed in the concept of “how to build in natural landscape?” The non-program pavilion disappears in the landscape, attempting to erase the division between the intervention and the area. This concern of integration reaches the point where the landscape generates the architecture itself.


The non-definition of the program has a wide range of uses, such as providing environmental awareness, doubling as an exposition hall or music hall, and providing activities support for the wider community. The interior space is as free as the liberty of program, furnishing the space with the energy of each use...


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Konza Techno City masterplan by SHoP Architects

Konza Techno City masterplan by SHoP Architects | scatol8® | Scoop.it

New images and movie of Konza Techno City masterplan in Kenya by Manhattan-based firm SHoP Architects.


Work is already underway on the pavilion that forms part of the first phase of SHoP Architects' masterplan for Konza Techno City, a business and technology hub that's been dubbed Kenya's "silicon savannah" 40 miles from the capital, Nairobi.


The $14.5 billion project will transform an area of grassland into a city of 250,000 residents. The city is expected to generate up to 200,000 jobs by the time its final phase is completed in 2030. The first phase, to be built over five years, will house 30,000 residents and be shaped like a row of "stitches" in the overall masterplan. The east-west axis of the first phase includes a boulevard of green spaces with bridges over the wide motorway leading to Nairobi. The four initial north-south axes will comprise, from west to east, a university, a residential area, a technology and life sciences district and a business district...


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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, January 31, 2013 5:20 PM

City Planing, a trend that will never stop - finding a new sustainable model for existing and new cities

 

Pedro Barbosa |www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

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Utile Makes a Splash With Digitally Fabricated Pavilion in Boston

Utile Makes a Splash With Digitally Fabricated Pavilion in Boston | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Jump on a ferry in Downtown Boston and in twenty minutes, you’ll arrive at the Boston Harbor Islands, an archipelago of 34 islands dotting Boston Harbor managed by the National Park Service. To entice city-dwellers to make the trip, Boston-based Utile Architecture + Planning has designed a composite steel and concrete pavilion with a digitally fabricated roof for the National Park Service and the Boston Harbor Island Alliance to provide travel information and history about the Islands and a shady respite atop the highway-capping Rose Kennedy Greenway.

 

Two thin overlapping concrete canopy slabs supported by delicate steel beams provide a sculptural shelter. Utile digitally designed the $4.2 million Boston Harbor Islands Pavilion using Rhino to respond to the surrounding cityscape and serve as a playful rainwater-harvesting system to irrigate the Greenway’s landscape...


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Crystal clear: the case for green building

Crystal clear: the case for green building | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Part office, part exhibition space, a new London landmark aims to challenge our assumptions about green design.


A new building in east London’s Royal Victoria Docks aims to change public perceptions of green architecture – while trialling some new sustainable technologies and approaches at scale. There’s not a green roof or thick insulated wall in sight. In fact, the structure, which is called the Crystal, is everything we’ve come to believe a sustainable building shouldn’t be: lightweight, angular, glazed from top to bottom and with a roof made out of steel.

Part office space, part interactive exhibition about the future of cities, the building is intended as a living experiment in sustainability that business leaders, politicians and the general public alike can learn from. “The building is a great demonstration of the ‘art of the possible’”, says Martin Hunt, Head of Networks and Partnerships at Forum for the Future. “It’s refreshing to see an interactive exhibition that visualises what our cities could be like – based on high quality research and thoughtful benchmarking. It brings the big issues of urban living – such as water and energy consumption, public health and safety – to life in a way that engages people and inspires them.”


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Duane Craig's curator insight, January 7, 2013 10:13 AM

It's quite enlightening, as pointed out here, that a lot of glass used correctly can actually yield a zero energy building. But I agree that assessing the true sustainability of the building would have to factor in all the embodied fossil fuel and other energy used to make its components. And when you're talking about glass, that could be huge.

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Innovation & Public Space: Melkwegbridge by NEXT Architects and Rietveld Landscape

Innovation & Public Space: Melkwegbridge by NEXT Architects and Rietveld Landscape | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The new Melkweg Bridge in Purmerend (NL) connects the old and new parts of the city with a unique design that accomodates both pedestrians and cyclists.


Developed by Dutch studios NEXT Architects and Rietveld Landscape, the bridge crosses the Noordhollandsch Kanaal to connect the historic city centre with the growing Weidevenne district in the south-west and is the first stage in a masterplan for the canal and its periphery. It does so with a steeply arching upper level for pedestrians and a zig-zagging lower level for cyclists and wheelchairs. The massive arch reaches the height of 12m above water level and offers incredible views over the city, with a high lookout that is an attraction in itself, letting users fully experience the relationship between the new and historic center of Purmerend.

 

"The aim of the design team was to create a new area with a specific identity, which could work as a connector between the old and the new centre," said NEXT Architects' Marijn Schenk...


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Living jewelry, a growing trend.

Living jewelry, a growing trend. | scatol8® | Scoop.it
If you're looking for a conversation piece, mission accomplished. Designers from Iceland to Etsy are expanding our definition of eco fabulous by fusing glamor and gardening in a series of well desi...

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Oakpass Residence by Heusch Architects

Oakpass Residence by Heusch Architects | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The Oakpass Residence in Beverly Hillls resembles a sleek modernist box wrapped in floor to ceiling glass, 12 feet above the ground on 10 narrow columns. The structure was elevated to not only circumvent the stringent  setback requirements, but to minimize the impact of development on the beautiful natural site, heavily wooded with oak trees.

This resulted in more light for the interior spaces, views from every room, and more privacy. Also it created a space underneath the house- part carport, part Zen garden. The pool is also elevated on 3 columns and the heavy exterior west facing concrete wall acts as a passive solar heat storage element.

The interior and exterior spaces blend seamlessly into each other due to the use of frameless floor to ceiling glass and a continuity of materials from the inside to the outside.


View more images of this minimalist, passive and site-responsive home at the link...


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Bay House by Roger Ferris + Partners

Bay House by Roger Ferris + Partners | scatol8® | Scoop.it

This residence located on the Long Island coastline is designed to capture and frame spectacular water views. The design also maximizes transparency between interior spaces and the link between interior and exterior.

The design embraces sustainability with geothermal design, daylighting, solar shading strategies and xeriscape landscaping...


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A Jungle Gym for City Sidewalks

A Jungle Gym for City Sidewalks | scatol8® | Scoop.it
A knotty lattice of colorful play-tubes is an intriguing use of a public space.


They say the city is an urban jungle. But an urban jungle gym? A\V Studio‘s new design for a spunky tubular playground at the foot of Morphosis’ Cooper Union New Academic Building proposes just that. "CMYPlay" is a knotty lattice of colorful play-tubes embedded in the ground floor of the Morphosis building, with crawl spaces wrapped around slanting columns and each other in a dense social thicket "befitting of Manhattan." The fanciful design is an appealing gesture and an intriguing use of what is virtually empty space.


An entry to the 3Dimensional Front,"CMYPlay" creates an interactive space outside the Milavec Hakimi Gallery at 41 Cooper Square. A\V Studio’s proposal "thickens" the facade by rehabilitating the underskirt area as an active social space within the local city fabric.

Burrowing visitors will (quite literally) run into strangers and colleagues alike, while the tops of the tubes can be street furniture. The clash of color and use of plastic are a pointed contrast to the details and surfaces of the Morphosis building. Also, the tubes could be recycled and sent to various playgrounds and schools to be re-used...


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