scatol8®
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Per rilevare e monitorare consumi energetici, temperatura, umidità e altre variabili ambientali
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Rescooped by scatol8 from Geography Education
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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | scatol8® | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 4:02 PM

This gallery of 16 families from around world together with their week food is quite a treat that shows agricultural, development and cultural patterns.  Pictured above is the Ayme family from Ecuador, just one of the many family's highlighted in the book Hungry Planet.  The Ayme family that typically spends $31.55 on food and commonly eat potato soup with cabbage.  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, worldwide, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, book reviews, culture, development, unit 3 culture.

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Nelson Cultural Center: LEED Gold at the American Swedish Institute, Minneapolis

Nelson Cultural Center: LEED Gold at the American Swedish Institute, Minneapolis | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The American Swedish Institute received a new addition with the LEED Gold-designed Nelson Cultural Center by HGA in Minneapolis.


The 34,000 sq ft addition provides space for education and cultural facilities for contemporary exhibitions, administrative offices, collections care, and expanded programs. Designed by locally-headquartered firm HGA, the new extension incorporates contemporary design, traditional Swedish aesthetics and a number of sustainable strategies. The Nelson Cultural Center is anticipating LEED Gold certification due to its sustainable building strategies, which include geothermal heating and cooling, a green roof and much more.


Sustainability was an important aspect of the design, and the institute anticipates LEED Gold certification for its efforts – which would make it the first museum in Minnesota with such accolades.


Via Lauren Moss
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What Makes a Great City: A General Theory of Walkability

What Makes a Great City: A General Theory of Walkability | scatol8® | Scoop.it

City engineers have turned our downtowns into places that are easy to get to but not worth arriving at.


In Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time (public library), city planner Jeff Speck, who spent four years leading the design division of the National Endowment for the Arts working directly with a couple hundred mayors to help solve their greatest city-planning challenges, turns a perceptive eye towards what makes a great city and how we might be able to harness the power of a conceptually simple, practically complex, immeasurably far-reaching solution in improving the fabric and experience of urban life.

 

Speck outlines a “General Theory of Walkability,” focusing on the four key factors of making a city attractive to pedestrians: 'it must be useful, safe, comfortable, and interesting. Each of these qualities is essential an none alone is sufficient...'


Learn more about urban livability, how to create the conditions that enable pedestrian-oriented development, and the benefits of this approach to urban spaces to the economic, environmental, and cultural health of a city at the article link...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by scatol8 from Geography Education
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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | scatol8® | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be lingistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Rescooped by scatol8 from Geography Education
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Mongolia's Nomads

Mongolia's Nomads | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Through his Vanishing Cultures Project photographer Taylor Weidman documents threatened ways of life.  About his work in Mongolia, he states: "Mongolian pastoral herders make up one of the world's largest remaining nomadic cultures. For millennia they have lived on the steppes, grazing their livestock on the lush grasslands. But today, their traditional way of life is at risk on multiple fronts. Alongside a rapidly changing economic landscape, climate change and desertification are also threatening nomadic life, killing both herds and grazing land."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 2, 2013 12:17 PM

In times of ecological hardships and global economic restructuring, many children of nomadic herders are seeking employment out of the rural areas and in the urban environment.  The cultural change that this represents is for Mongolia enormous and is captured wonderfully in this photo gallery.  Pictured above are the ger (yurt) camps that ring the capital city Ulaanbaatar.  Ulaanbaatar houses a permanent population of displaced nomads. During the winter, Ulaanbaatar is the second most air-polluted capital in the world due largely to coal burning.


Tags: Mongolia, images, indigenous, culture, globalization.  

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 12, 2013 6:44 PM

What factors are threatening pastoral herders way of life? Why?

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 11:45 AM

Time for more pictures, my favorite part of scooping. Mongolia is almost entirely forgotten in US education, to the point where many of the people I know aren't even sure if there's a government at all. My favorite part of these pictures comes from the fusion of technology and tradition though. We see traditional housing and boys carrying water to their homes, and then a flat screen television in the makeshift house. Motorcycles are used to herd animals, and solar polar is used to power cell phones for the nomads. What I think is important here among other things is the idea that humanity has potentially reached a point where we cannot go backwards tech-wise. The dark ages in Europe saw knowledge being lost, and there are claims that humanity will wipe out its own tech in a great war, but now that we have the knowledge and ability to use solar panels and automobiles, I don't believe we'll ever lose them as a species.

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Culture Forest: Community-oriented ecological design by Unsangdong Architects

Culture Forest: Community-oriented ecological design by Unsangdong Architects | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Unsangdong Architects have designed “Culture Forest”, a multi-use building and art center located in SeongDong-gu, Republic of Korea. The project is expected to be completed next year.


From the architects:

'The scenery looking at Seongdong will be as open as possible, providing a landscape of intensive and storytelling experience... Each program consists of an eco friendly and creative cultural space and green area. The skin of will unify architecture and nature through green walls and generates energy by solar powered panel skin.'


Visit the link to read the complete architect's description of the winning proposal for this new cultural development that integrates technology, ecology, and community...


Via Lauren Moss
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Huangshan Mountain Village: sustainability grows in the Chinese landscape

Huangshan Mountain Village: sustainability grows in the Chinese landscape | scatol8® | Scoop.it

MAD has unveiled plans for a towering village of apartment blocks beside the Huangshan Mountains in eastern China. 


Inspired by the topographical layers of the landscape, the buildings will have organically shaped floor plates and will emerge from amongst the treetops on a site beside the Taiping Lake.

 

The high-density village features low-rise residences that echo the contours of the surrounding topography and offer unequalled access to one of China’s  landscapes.

The site of verdant scenery and limestone cliffs have long inspired artists and offered sheltered spaces for contemplation and reflection, contributing to its UNESCO Heritage status. Composed in deference to the local topography, the village provides housing, a hotel and communal amenities organized in a linked configuration. As its form evokes the geology of the region, the village blurs the boundaries between the geometries of architecture and nature.

For residents, the apartments will be a quiet retreat –  all have spacious balconies which overlook the lake. Communal amenities and walking paths encourage residents to explore the landscape. Each floor is unique and accessed from shared social spaces, creating a seamless balance between private and public spaces. The same serene design sensibility of natural environment extends to the interiors, with the use of local materials and the incorporation of plants and greenery enhancing comfort and well-being, while simultaneously setting up a closer connection with local culture...


Via Lauren Moss
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François Lanthier's comment, November 19, 2012 4:48 PM
Love it! Where do you find all thins great information?
association concert urbain's comment, November 19, 2012 4:55 PM
From www.dezeen.com
association concert urbain's comment, November 19, 2012 4:55 PM
Via Lauren Moss
Rescooped by scatol8 from The Landscape Café
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Three reasons why Copenhagen is the world leader in urban sustainability

Three reasons why Copenhagen is the world leader in urban sustainability | scatol8® | Scoop.it

"The buzz from Copenhagen is all about its new "superhighway" for bikes. The real secret to its pioneering urban design, though, is that it puts people first on all its streets."

 

this is cool!!! 


Via Laurence Serfaty, Wa Gon, David Hodgson, Anne Caspari
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