Minorities and the SAT
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More minorities take the SAT college entrance exam, but achievement gap doesn't close, scores down

More minorities take the SAT college entrance exam, but achievement gap doesn't close, scores down | Minorities and the SAT | Scoop.it
At scores of city public school students heading off to college this fall continued their downward spiral, according to data released on Tuesday.
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More and more minorities are taking the SAT than ever before however, they're not doing any better on the SAT; in fact, their scores actually went down from last year the NY Daily News reports. The white and asian populations are staying at the same, constant rate but the other minorites are not improving much at all. Should colleges look into the fact that certain races have been proven to score less on the SAT than other? Should SAT scores have that dramatic of an impact on a student's admission into college even with these overwhelming results displaying that certain races are at a disadvantage when it comes to the SAT?

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SAT may have bias against minorities

SAT may have bias against minorities | Minorities and the SAT | Scoop.it
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The article points out that the SAT is unintentionally biased toward white people. Studies have shown that as a whole the White population scores higher than the majority of the other minorities year in and year out on the SAT. There are also studies that have shown that there are particular questions that the whites will consistently get correct on the test whereas the minorities have a harder time with those questions aimed at "helping" the whites. The SAT is obviously a test that is extremely challenging for those with English as their second language but to those minorites who do know English they are still struggling with the test. The creators of the test are not doing this intentionally; they believe in equity for all as their website declares the "ETS (Educational Testing Service) is committed to producing tests that acknowledge the multicultural nature of society and treat its diverse populations with respect". If the ETS is committed to accomodating the test to all peoples then why are minorities not doing as well? As a white student I guess I really didn't see any unfair questions on the test, but who knows, maybe the minorities in the room felt differently than I did on specific parts of the test. If the SAT is one of the biggest factors going into college acceptance than shouldn't all have the same advantage? A thorough investigation must be conducted at the ETS before each test is submitted to be taken because some students may be put at a disadvantage without the ETS even actually realizing it.

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Picture_116.png (351x366 pixels)

Picture_116.png (351x366 pixels) | Minorities and the SAT | Scoop.it
Tommy Hibbs's insight:

This picture crunches some really telling numbers for the SAT. There is a direct correlation between money and score and race and score. The people with the highest amount of money earn the greater score; the people who make the least, their kids earn the lower scores. Why is this? Is it because the students with parents who make more money are more invested into their children's academic career? Is it because those with more money can afford to send their children to SAT prep courses? Do parents who make less money simply not care about their children's tests scores? Money equals standardized testing success and that has been proven time and time again. It seems unfair that just because a student is born into a poorer family that they're less likely succeed on the SAT and have a harder time getting into college. The schools must adress this issue and try to help those on the lower end of the income scale be better prepared for this test that means so much.

 

The Asian race scores the highest on the SAT, then come the Whites, then the Native Americans, and finally the Latinos. The minorities have been and continue to struggle on this exam. Does race determine one's intelligence? We all know that that isn't true in the 21st century. However, it appears that certain races are doing better on this exam, maybe due to more economic opportunity and a test that may be more tailored to them. The race of an individual seems to suggest what may happen to one's score and that score carries a lot of weight in the college admissions process. Is that fair? I believe we need to close the gap.

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Record number of minorities take SAT but lag in college readiness

Record number of minorities take SAT but lag in college readiness | Minorities and the SAT | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Minority students made up a record portion of SAT test takers in 2013, and blacks and Hispanics improved on the U.S.
Tommy Hibbs's insight:

The minorities take up an estimated 46% of the population taking the SAT each year. They are usually underrepresented in the classroom but on the SAT they are represented pretty respectably. The minorities, specifically Blacks and Hispanics, are not meeting the national standards being set by the SAT time and time again whereas the Whites and Asian as a whole score higher. The article points out that generally the Blacks and Hispanics don't have as easy of an access to SAT prep courses and AP classes that would better prepare them for the standardized test. The question raised is how do we ensure that these two people groups score higher on the SAT? it is foolish to think that the Blacks and Hispanics disregard the test as studies show most students want to attend college. The Hispanic and Black population as a whole are not socioeconomically as fortunate as the Whites or Asians and there is a direct correlation between money and SAT scores. How do we get the minorities to do better on their SAT? Should the SAT even be taken into account when it is obvious that some score higher than others due to factors out of their control?

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