Sarah's Key
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Concentration camps in France

Concentration camps in France | Sarah's Key | Scoop.it
Lee Brooks's insight:

This is a map of where all the concentration camps were located in France. In Paris, there were three large camps that held the majority of the French-Jews. South of France had about eight different camps along the boarder.

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Children

Children | Sarah's Key | Scoop.it
Lee Brooks's insight:

This is a picture of the children that were deported during the roundup of 1942 in Paris, France. The children didn't understand what was going on until later when their parents told them. Sarah from the book didn't know what was happening, she thought she would be returning home that evening and rescuing her little brother.

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France

France | Sarah's Key | Scoop.it
Lee Brooks's insight:

France is a country that has done it's best to forget the tragic event that they created in 1942. France ruined many peoples lives and took them away as well.

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Nazi Concentration Camps

Nazi Concentration Camps | Sarah's Key | Scoop.it
On conditions found in Nazi concentration camps in Germany and Belgium by advancing Allied Armies during World War II. Consists primarily of dead and...
Lee Brooks's insight:

The documentary “Nazi Concentration Camp” is real life footage of when the United States got involved with the Holocaust. The video describes the events that occurred when the United States worked with the Allied Armies to save the prisoners; they describe the victims reactions to being saved and gave examples to how they were treated.

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Lee Brooks's insight:

This article "Hailing the rescuers: The French helped send Jews to Auschwitz, but their honouring of les Justes deserves our respect, says historian MICHAEL MARRUS", the author Michael Marrus talks about a ceremony that was to be taken place on January 18, 2012. The ceremony was to honor the men and women who were rescuers during the Velodrome d'Hiver in 1942. He gives a perspective on how both sides will see the ceremony; those who frown upon the French society for the outbreaks of anti-Jewish violence won't care for the ceremony and will complain that the recognition took too long, and the other side will be happy about the recognition. France identified 2,725 French rescuers, men and women who risked their lives to conceal and save Jews from the war. More than two-thirds of the 330,000 Jews in France escaped the Holocaust, almost every single one of them were helped by at least one non-Jew, whether they fed, sheltered, warned or clothed the Jews.

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Forgotten Children

Lee Brooks's insight:

This article "France's 'forgotten' children" the author Peter Goddard talks about the photos at “C’Etaient des Enfants” (They Were Children) the controversial exhibition at Paris’s City Hall. The photos were all of the children who were sent to the concentration camps. Goddard states that out of the 12,884 Jews that were rounded up in July of 1942, 4,051 of those victims were children. Over the four years of the Nazi occupation, a total of 76,000 Jews were deported and more than half of the 11,400 children sent to the gas chambers were from Paris. He describes each picture and tells their story. Goddard claims that the schools tried to name the kids that had died to keep records and to contact the families that did survive.

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Velodrome d'Hiver

Velodrome d'Hiver | Sarah's Key | Scoop.it
Lee Brooks's insight:

This is the building that held 12,884 Jewish people for five days before transporting them to the concentration camps. The round up that occurred in July of 1942 was later called Vel d'Hiv after the sports center Velodrome d'Hiver. 

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Vel d'Hiv

Vel d'Hiv | Sarah's Key | Scoop.it
Lee Brooks's insight:

This picture relates to my topic because this is the Jews that were taken from France and put into concentration camps. More than half of these people were dead. A small part of the people escaped. This is the Jews boarding the train to get to the concentration camp after staying in the Velodrome d'Hiver for five days.

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Sarah's Key: Tatiana de Rosnay: 9780312370848: Amazon.com: Books

Sarah's Key

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Sarah's Key [Tatiana de Rosnay] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Paris, July 1942: Sarah, a ten year-old girl, is brutally arrested with her family by the French police in the Vel’ d’Hiv’ roundup
Lee Brooks's insight:

Sarah’s Key is two stories that take place at different times but eventually connect to each other. Julia is a journalist for an American Magazine, she has been given a new topic to research because the anniversary is coming up. The topic is about the roundup in France during World War II, they call it the “Vel d’Hiver”. On July 16, 1942, thousands of French policemen capture 12,884 Jews; Sarah and her parents happen to be one to those Jews. Sarah has a little brother Michel; she locked him in a cupboard thinking that she would be able to come back later in the day and get him out, she was too young to understand what was going on in the world. The French police take her and her parents away to the concentration camps, there they get separated and she escapes with a girl named Rachel. While walking to Paris so that she could save her brother, an old man finds her and takes the girls to his house so that he could feed and care for them. Rachel becomes ill, so the old couple finds a doctor. The doctor realizes that she was a Jew so he called the police and they took the young girl away. The police didn’t find Sarah, so she stayed with the old couple; they raised her as their granddaughter. While Sarah is away struggling to return to her brother, a family moves into her apartment. The old couple took her to Paris so that she could get closure on whether someone helped her little brother or not. When she arrives at the apartment, she opens the cupboard to find her young brother dead. The family who was living there was Julia’s in-laws. Her father-in-law was the one who told her the truth about Sarah. He asks her to do more investigating, which had upset her husband because he wanted her to stop snooping around and to stop obsessing over the Vel d’Hiver. Julia decided that find out the truth was more important than anything else. She ends up finding out that Sarah could no longer handle the burden of her past and she committed suicide in 1972. Julia also discovered that Sarah had a son, William, she gets in contact with him and tells him everything. Years later, William contacts Julia again and meets up with her in New York to talk to her more about his mother.

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Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation | Chemins de Mémoire - Ministère de la Défense - Ministère de la Défense

Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation | Chemins de Mémoire - Ministère de la Défense - Ministère de la Défense | Sarah's Key | Scoop.it
Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation :   Inaugurated on 12 April 1962 by General de Gaulle, then President of the Republic of France, the Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation is a memorial to the 200,000 people deported from Vichy France and evokes certain characteristics of the concentration camps: imprisonment, oppression and impossible escape, the long process of attrition, the desire for extermination and abasement. Designed by the architect Georges-Henri Pingusson, the vast, hexagonal, dimly-lit crypt opens onto the gallery covered by luminous rods representing the deported people killed in the camps and the ashes of an unknown deportee from Natzweiler-Struthof camp.   Either side of the crypt, two small galleries contain earth from the different camps and ashes brought back from the cremation ovens, enshrined in triangular urns. All around, the names of the camps and excerpts from poems by Robert Desnos, Louis Aragon, Paul Eluard, Jean-Paul Sartre and Antoine de Saint-Exupéry are inscribed in red characters.   Every year, on the last Sunday of April, the Memorial is visited in honour of the National Day of Remembrance of the Victims and Heroes of the Deportation.
Lee Brooks's insight:

The Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation is a memorial that was built in April of 1962 to remember the 200,000 people who were deported from France and other unknown areas. The website gives the names of the victims.

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Camps

Lee Brooks's insight:

In this article "A Michelin noir" the author, Barbara Lerner describes the conditions of the concentration camps in France during World War II. She gives details about the French operating internment camps that held immigrants and Jews in 1938-39, after the end of the Spanish Civil War. Lerner tells about the “Vel d’Hiver”, the day that 9,000 French policemen went door-to-door in apartment buildings and bed-to-bed in hospitals carting off on stretchers those who could not walk and then searching the streets and the cafes. For five days, 12,884 Jews were confined in the Velodrome d’Hiver sports arena. They were then sorted out and sent to one of the five deplorable and unsanitary concentration camps in Paris. She mentions that the concentration camps were established long before the summer of 1942, meaning that they were not, originally, intended specifically for Jews. The author created a detailed timeline of the events that occurred in France involving politics and the war.

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