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Rescooped by Denis Granger from Digital et santé
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Texting the Teenage Patient

Texting the Teenage Patient | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
Doctors are making house calls via texting, blogs and social networks like Facebook and Twitter.

 

"The teenager’s cellphone buzzes. Her doctor, Natasha Burgert, is texting her: “Better morning with this medication?”

 

Another teenager opens his phone. “Everything is great,” reads Dr. Burgert’s discreet text. “Go ahead with the plan we discussed. Please reply so I know you received.”

 

And on the morning of college entrance exams, a teenager who suffers from a roiling stomach reads Dr. Burgert’s texted greeting: “Prepared. Focused. Calm. Your body is healthy and well. Good luck today.”

 

Dr. Burgert, a pediatrician in Kansas City, Mo., is making house calls. She is among a small but growing number of practitioners using social media to engage adolescents. Her patients read her blog and follow her on Twitter and Facebook. She even follows a few of the teenagers’ blogs, commenting occasionally.

 

During checkups, Dr. Burgert no longer gives teenagers brochures with advice on healthy living — which usually led to glazed expressions and teeming wastebaskets. Instead, a whiteboard hangs in her exam room, with hyperlinks and QR codes to sites with teenager-friendly material on sexuality, alcohol and drugs. The teenagers can photograph the board with their phones, storing the information to peruse in private." (...)


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Denis Granger's comment, October 12, 2012 3:53 AM
Exactly what we are providing in that website for doctors and patients relationsship : www.entrepatients.net
Rescooped by Denis Granger from "Global patient empowerment: global health literacy & education - ehealth literacy - public health promotion - narrative tools & social media - epatients - patient expertise - patient advocacy - shared health decision making " by VAB Traductions
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Patient Engagement, Health Literacy Amid Top Patient Safety Issues

Patient Engagement, Health Literacy Amid Top Patient Safety Issues | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
March 15, 2018 - Patient engagement and patient health literacy have ranked among the top patient safety issues on ECRI Institute’s 2018 Top 10 Patient Safety Concerns for Healthcare Organizations.

Patient engagement and patient safety ranked nine out of the 10 items. Topping the list were diagnostic errors, opioid misuse and safety, and care coordination within a healthcare setting.

Patient engagement and patient health literacy can have a considerable influence on organization-wide patient safety initiatives. An engaged and well-educated patient can serve as a protective barrier to patient safety incidents and can support providers who are trying to prevent medical errors.

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Rescooped by Denis Granger from Social Media and Healthcare
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The Gap Between Real World Healthcare & Social Media

The Gap Between Real World Healthcare & Social Media | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it

Part of what I like to think makes my blog unique is that I’ve been a cancer patient as well as a clinician treating cancer patients. So, I have one foot in each camp, as it were.

This blog, and my introduction to social media, germinated almost ten years ago after I had been diagnosed with breast cancer in July of 2008. Desperate for help and information, I found my way, as many have and many will, to BreastCancer.org and it’s online, peer support community. Dozens, possibly hundreds, of the people I connected with in that community are still my friends online all these years later on other social media. Then and now, these friends help validate my experience and often provide helpful information about breast cancer and treatment and side effects and middle-of-the-night freaking out. Back then, communicating with them spurred me to start reading research studies again, which I hadn’t done much of since physical therapy graduate school. Because of that, I began to connect with clinical and medical and science websites, and with researchers who’d published interesting studies or were seeking study participants. One of the most helpful experiences I had early on was finding an online listing for two doctors within driving distance who were conducting a clinical trial on treating cancer related fatigue. Thus, I am one of the first people to extol the virtues of social media and of those of us who employ it to advocate for better healthcare.

But…

And it’s an important ‘but.’ I may write about healthcare here in cyberspace, but in my daily, real-world job, I work in the concrete world. I do connect with a secure server to upload my patient notes and download my schedule each day on my work laptop. And I email my colleagues and share a few pdf’s.

But my real work has little to do with zeroes and ones. I see patients of all ages, with all kinds of healthcare problems, in their homes, and try to teach them to walk better or not fall or to get out of bed without pain. And I have to tell you that, for most of them, social media has little to no impact on their experience of their own health and healthcare. A few of them might have a Fitbit. A few might have a patient portal account that they use to email their doctors’ offices or confirm upcoming appointments. And that’s about it.

The last thing that most, perhaps nearly all, of my patients would consider doing when they have a health crisis is to get online. You’d be forgiven for thinking this is an age thing, that it’s because most of my patients are elderly. And you’d be wrong. Sometimes, it does occur to a few of them, or to one of their family members or caregivers, to buy things like tub seats and walkers online. Most of the time, however, I have to tell them they can buy that stuff online. I have to tell the folks who have uncommon chronic diseases, or even common ones, that there are online communities that can help them feel less isolated. I have to tell them that there are websites for our state’s department of health, the department of elderly affairs, the local hospital or orthopedic practice, for Cancer.org, for the American Diabetes Association, etcetera, ad infinitum.

Pay No Attention to That Charlatan Behind the Curtain

Why don’t people get online for help with their health issues? Because they have health issues. Which means that they feel like shit, they’re exhausted, confused, overwhelmed, in pain, and generally gobsmacked. And the last thing they feel like doing is anything that does not immediately and concretely help them to feel better. And you know what? Mostly, I’m glad they don’t get online. I want them to listen to me and their doctors and nurses, and to follow our advice, not to read most of the execrable bullshit that passes on the web for healthcare information. I do not want them getting their health advice from the likes of Gwyneth Paltrow or Dr. Google. It’s bad enough that they watch TV. I wish I had a dollar for every time I’ve had to refute some nonsense a patient heard via Doctor Oz.

It’s hard enough for me to sort through the dross on the web to find the genuine nuggets. And I have an advanced degree in science. And I still get hoodwinked sometimes. But I also have online friends who are scientists, doctors, and intelligent healthcare journalists, and we help each other wade through the swamp.

That is not, however, true for most people. I have some very admirable friends online who have devoted themselves to improving health literacy, who work hard to improve their own, so that they can provide the patient’s perspective to researchers who design studies. But the odds that most of the thousands of people I have ever treated in the past twenty-five years could or would find their way to these web advocates or others like them is a snowball’s chance in hell. For real.

A Breed Apart

The thing to keep in mind is that those of us who are members of the healthcare social media community are not most people. Yet we may think we’re more important than we really are to most people. If there’s one thing that social media is good at, it’s declaring how important and influential social media is. And that’s true, up to a point. But we need a little humility, a little perspective about our role. When you have crushing, unrelenting chest pain, the sensible response is not to Tweet about it. You call a freaking ambulance.

I remember the first time I took a survey — one of several over the years — about how useful social media had been to me as a cancer patient. It was put together by a grad student who was working on her Ph.D. and whose mom had had breast cancer. It was pretty good. But when I got to the questions about who did the most to help me outlast cancer, or who I could most count on in a crisis, none of the answers included social media. The answers included the doctors and other clinicians who treated me, and the friends who drove me to see them. And yet, to hear some tell it, social media is going to save us all and reinvent the healthcare system. Really? Tell that to all my patients and work colleagues. Social media has facilitated awareness, research, and patient support. And it will continue to spur new and worthwhile ideas and projects. But the rest of the fix is not that simple.

In the Trenches

If you want to hear a passionate discussion about how to fix the healthcare system, talk to another clinician. And I don’t mean online. I mean in person, in a clinical setting or at a seminar. Or at the local pub over a beer or three. You’ve never heard intelligent snark like you’ll hear from us. A few of the doctors I’ve known over the years, who have also treated me as a patient, are especially enlightening. When I see them for a checkup, we often spend the first few minutes having a nice, soul-cleansing rant about it all. Do they check out social media for ways to further the cause? Hell, no. They have neither the time nor the energy. Frequently, neither do I. We’re all too busy trying to help our patients get better, or returning their phone calls, or typing notes about them on a computer, or wrangling with insurance companies and their criteria for reimbursement, or going to meetings and continuing ed seminars so we can remain competent enough to keep our licenses. On a daily, practical basis, has social media or digital documentation made our work easier or better? Not really.

I don’t have any immediate answers to this conundrum. And the ideas I have would require another blog post. But I can tell you one thing. When my patients improve, it has everything to do with how much access they feel they have to a real-world clinician who knows them, and how empowered they feel to take responsibility for their health. And then to do what they truly need to do in order to get better. And that’s where fostering the nexus between social media and the real world may be genuinely useful. Any and all ideas welcome. In the meantime, onward, friends.


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Technology and Social Media Use Among Patients Enrolled in Outpatient Addiction Treatment Programs: Cross-Sectional Survey Study

Technology and Social Media Use Among Patients Enrolled in Outpatient Addiction Treatment Programs: Cross-Sectional Survey Study | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it

Background: Substance use disorder research and practice have not yet taken advantage of emerging changes in communication patterns. While internet and social media use is widespread in the general population, little is known about how these mediums are used in substance use disorder treatment.

Objective: The aims of this paper were to provide data on patients' with substance use disorders mobile phone ownership rates, usage patterns on multiple digital platforms (social media, internet, computer, and mobile apps), and their interest in the use of these platforms to monitor personal recovery.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients in 4 intensive outpatient substance use disorder treatment facilities in Philadelphia, PA, USA. Logistic regressions were used to examine associations among variables.

Results: Survey participants (N=259) were mostly male (72.9%, 188/259), African American (62.9%, 163/259), with annual incomes less than US $10,000 (62.5%, 161/259), and averaged 39 (SD 12.24) years of age. The vast majority of participants (93.8%, 243/259) owned a mobile phone and about 64.1% (166/259) owned a mobile phone with app capabilities, of which 85.1% (207/243) accessed the internet mainly through their mobile phone. There were no significant differences in age, gender, ethnicity, or socio-economic status by computer usage, internet usage, number of times participants changed their phone, type of mobile phone contract, or whether participants had unlimited calling plans. The sample was grouped into 3 age groups (Millennials, Generation Xers, and Baby Boomers). The rates of having a social media account differed across these 3 age groups with significant differences between Baby Boomers and both Generation Xers and Millennials (P<.001 in each case). Among participants with a social media account (73.6%, 190/259), most (76.1%, 144/190) reported using it daily and nearly all (98.2%, 186/190) used Facebook. Nearly half of participants (47.4%, 90/190) reported viewing content on social media that triggered substance cravings and an equal percentage reported being exposed to recovery information on social media. There was a significant difference in rates of reporting viewing recovery information on social media across the 3 age groups with Baby Boomers reporting higher rates than Millennials (P<.001). The majority of respondents (70.1%, 181/259) said they would prefer to use a relapse prevention app on their phone or receive SMS (short message service) relapse prevention text messages (72.3%, 186/259), and nearly half (49.1%, 127/259) expressed an interest in receiving support by allowing social media accounts to be monitored as a relapse prevention technique.

Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first and largest study examining the online behavior and preferences regarding technology-based substance use disorder treatment interventions in a population of patients enrolled in community outpatient treatment programs. Patients were generally receptive to using relapse prevention apps and text messaging interventions and a substantial proportion supported social media surveillance tools. However, the design of technology-based interventions remains as many participants have monthly telephone plans which may limit continuity.


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Why I Decided to Reveal My Crohn’s Disease on Social Media

Why I Decided to Reveal My Crohn’s Disease on Social Media | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it

On the morning of my 27th birthday, I sat in a hospital bed, typing carefully into the Notes app on my phone. I was drafting a social media post to share the news of the Crohn’s disease flare-up that had carved a fistula (tunnel-like hole) into my intestines. The subsequent sepsis infection had landed me in the emergency room.

I was exhausted from a four-day hospital stay full of 4 a.m. blood draws, CT scans, and waiting what seemed like forever to talk with my doctors. It would be easiest, I thought, to just update everyone who followed me on social media in one go. The only problem: I couldn’t figure out what to say.

When I did eventually land on the right words, the response was surprisingly, overwhelmingly positive. It not only reaffirmed my decision to share about my Crohn’s disease on social media, it helped me chart a new path forward in how I handle the condition—and how I view myself.

At first, I worried that talking about my Crohn’s on social media was too personal, too unfiltered for Facebook and Instagram.

I paused as I struggled to find the right words, my eyes welling as I looked at the birthday balloons and flowers sitting on the window sill, day breaking into orange behind the white blinds. As anyone with a chronic illness knows, talking about your health—and fielding the resultant questions—can be an exhausting, vulnerable act. I’d told a few loved ones I was in the hospital, but most people I knew didn’t even realize I had Crohn’s.

WATCH THISJane The Virgin Star Gina Rodriguez Opens Up About Hashimoto's Disease And Her Superpower
 

Crohn’s, like many chronic illnesses, is somewhat stigmatized, or at least usually not seen as a topic up for casual discussion, nonetheless an Instagram post where many come for feel-good content. But I was tired of seeing my Crohn’s as no big deal, or something to be brushed aside or hidden. Sharing about Crohn’s on social media would allow me to connect with people in a concrete way, I realized. It would let me show what was really going on in a body that looked otherwise very abled. So, I decided to go public.

I wondered if, when I posted, I’d forever become the “sick girl” in people’s minds, just someone to feel sorry for. I was scared of isolating myself by sharing the intimate details of my own failing body. I kept erasing my words and trying again, but ultimately, I had little energy to keep worrying about what exactly to say. I hit “share” despite my doubts, and the dread set in almost immediately. I threw my phone to the end of the hospital bed, turning up the volume on TLC’s Four Weddings.

Soon enough, the support started rolling in. I was inundated with responses from close friends, family members, college acquaintances, and friends of friends. My face flushed as I scrolled through the well wishes, the heart emojis, the positive vibes, and the prayers. Some people praised me for being “so open about this.” Others thanked me for writing about Crohn’s because they hadn’t heard of it before. Still others referred me to people who wanted to ask me about Crohn’s away from public comment threads.

It worked in reverse, too. People generously sent along names and contact information for those I could talk to about having Crohn's and all that comes with it, from surgeries to dietary changes. I was happily surprised to find such a supportive network and acceptance in sharing the reality of what it’s like to have Crohn’s.

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Courtesy of Annalise MabeI first started experiencing symptoms of Crohn’s disease when I was a junior in high school, and I didn’t want to talk about it with anyone except my mom and my doctors.

At 17, my stomach began to twist and turn, aching in a way I’d never experienced. I started to make elaborate excuses in school and at friends’ houses about why I had to leave suddenly, when really, diarrhea was making me rush to the bathroom. I would tell teachers and friends I’d forgotten something in my locker, or needed to go home to get my migraine medicine, all so I could use the bathroom without their knowing it. I did tell my mom what was going on, though, how the pain and bathroom trips were interrupting work, school, my social life. She got me into a gastroenterologist's office immediately.

Over several weeks, I endured tests like an endoscopy, where doctors insert a tube into your throat to see your esophagus, stomach, and part of your small intestine, a colonoscopy, where doctors thread a tube into your rectum so they can examine your large intestine, and a capsule endoscopy, where you swallow a pill containing a camera that takes thousands of pictures of your insides.

Based on the results, my doctor confirmed that I had a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) called Crohn’s disease. This condition happens when inflammation in the digestive tract (typically the small intestine and beginning of the large intestine) causes miserable symptoms like diarrhea, abdominal cramping, fatigue, fever, nausea, and joint pain, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. While the cause of Crohn’s disease isn’t completely clear, it may come about when a person’s immune system thinks its own intestines are a foreign invader and seeks to obliterate them.

Being in high school, the last thing I wanted was to stick out and for my friends to know of the bathroom trips, or about the big bottle of blue steroids I carried around to reduce inflammation in my intestines. Talking about my illness felt like a huge faux pas. It was with this mindset that I held tightly onto my diagnosis like I would a shameful secret, dreading the eager eyes from my peers, their curious questions.

In college, I sometimes did mention my Crohn’s to friends or partners. But it was typically in passing, as a minute detail not worth discussing in full. No one ever seemed to think it was a big deal or asked any questions to prompt me to share more. The few times I did take the plunge and tell my friends about what it was really like to have Crohn’s, about the pain and how my uncontrollable GI tract seemed to act of its own volition, they listened, but it didn’t seem like they had much to say. It was more like, “Wow, that sucks…Can you throw me a beer?”

Crohn’s didn’t appear to warrant any serious discussion, so I stopped treating it as something serious—until it forced me to.

My severe Crohn’s flare-up and sepsis infection made me realize that social media can offer a special kind of support and understanding for those with chronic illnesses.

It’s not just that people reached out to me, though that was a big part of it. I also realized that if I was sharing about my journey with Crohn’s disease, other people probably were, too.

Through looking up hashtags like #Crohns and #CrohnsDisease, I found immensely helpful Instagram accounts like @CrohnsisCray, @CrohnsCooking, and @CrohnsWarrior. Instantly, I was let into the personal lives of other people with Crohn's. I could see snapshots of their struggles (some which were similar to mine, others I've yet to face), of their healing, of their hard and good days alike. Social media has been instrumental in finding people like me, getting an idea of what Crohn’s looks like for others, and ultimately learning how to live the happiest, healthiest life I can with this disease.

Maybe this is what we need. More doses of reality unfiltered. Less posing for the social-media picture, where we’re trained to show the best versions of ourselves.

In a space that’s built on a system of likes, chronic illness doesn’t seem to fit. But I’ve come to my own terms with how I choose to showcase myself, Crohn’s included, on my social media accounts. While some snapshots show me smiling with snacks in hand on an immunosuppressant-infusion-day, others show me in a hospital gown on a really hard day. In the end, it’s important for me to share the spectrum of my life with Crohn’s disease, not just the happy days where I’m symptom-free.

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Courtesy of Annalise MabeIn one of the hardest times of my life, I (begrudgingly) put myself out there and realized that it was OK to talk about illness, and that doing so would make the lifelong journey, the ups and downs of having Crohn’s, a lot less scary.

While going public with a chronic illness may not be for everyone, sharing about my recent jaunt with Crohn’s has made me closer with friends and people who used to be strangers, but have since become so much more. These people have brought me flowers, sent me actual, tangible snail mail, and visited me in the hospital bearing gifts to cheer me up.

More than that, they’ve reminded me that I don’t need to be perfect to be accepted, loved, or even admired, and, ultimately, that I don’t have to go through this alone.

Annalise Mabe is a writer and teacher from Tampa, Florida. She can be found at @AnnaliseMabe onTwitter, @Annalise.Gray on Instagram, and at annalisemabe.com


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ScientificAnimations's comment, June 18, 6:58 AM
Diarrhea, a common illness, can be caused by various factors, both infectious and non-infectious. Read more... http://sco.lt/5TZoVF
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Réseaux sociaux : portrait robot du socionaute en 2018

Réseaux sociaux : portrait robot du socionaute en 2018 | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
59% des français utilisent les réseaux sociaux. Soit plus de 38 millions de personnes. Quel portrait peut-on dresser de ces français socionautes, définitivement converties aux joies de la socialité
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FredColantonio's curator insight, March 5, 5:10 AM

A qui ressemblent les utilisateurs des médias et réseaux sociaux français en 2018 ?

• 42 ans en moyenne
• 82 minutes en moyenne
• 2,6 plateformes en moyenne

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Consumer Health and Patient Engagement – Are We There Yet?

Consumer Health and Patient Engagement – Are We There Yet? | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it

Along with artificial intelligence, patient engagement feels like the new black in health care right now. Perhaps that’s because we’re just two weeks out from the annual HIMSS Conference which will convene thousands of health IT wonks, users and developers (I am the former), but I’ve received several reports this week speaking to health engagement and technology that are worth some trend-weaving.

As my colleague-friends Gregg Masters of Health Innovation Media (@2healthguru) and John Moore of Chilmark Research (@john_chilmark)  challenged me on Twitter earlier this week: are we scaling sustained, real patient engagement and empowerment yet?

Let’s dive into the reports’ findings to divine an answer for Gregg and John.

Change Healthcare published the company’s 8th Annual Industry Pulse Report, which examines key challenges facing payors and other stakeholders this year. The report analyzes results of a survey of over 2,000 Change Healthcare customers (from academia, government, technology vendors, hospitals, providers, and health plans), conducted in October-November 2017.

Several findings address patient and health engagement in this study, including:

The failure of high-deductibles’ “skin-in-the-game” theory to turn  patients into active health consumersThe growth of health plans and providers integrating social determinants of health into health strategies and tactics for improving peoples’ health outcomes and engagementThe migration of incentives from negative “sticks” to positive “carrots” along with more value-based benefit design in motivating consumer health behavior.

One of my favorite series of papers that inform my advisory work comes from PwC on the New Health Economy, this week publishing its report on Customer experience in the New Health Economy – the data cure. A highlight of their survey found that one-half of provider executives sees customer (patient, clinician) experience as a top strategic priority over the next 5 years, and most payer execs are investing in technology to improve member experience. Remember that health insurers rank very low on consumer experience compared with retailers and grocers.

PwC offers five pillars for healthcare stakeholders to build on to improve experience, including:

ConvenienceQualitySupportPersonalization, andCommunication.

Finally, CarePayment studied the skin-in-the-game motivation for engagement, finding that 61% of patients don’t have money saved for healthcare expenses, and two-thirds of people have avoided or delayed medical care in the last year due to expected costs.

An alarming anti-engagement statistic is that 44% of the 1,000 consumers surveyed said they would not get needed medical care, even if it put their health at-risk, knowing they would have out-of-pocket expenses of $500.

The 20/20 CarePayment survey team also noted in their press release that among people who did not seek healthcare, medical debt is a growing and common problem impacting + nearly 1 in 4 Americans under 65.

The CarePayment poll was conducted in November-December 2017.

Health Populi’s Hot Points:  So, Gregg and John, to your question: has patient empowerment and engagement scaled yet in U.S. healthcare?

Well, it depends on how we define the terms, and through what and whose lens. I do see green shoots of engagement among patients in the U.S., both for clinical activation and financial/shopping muscles.

A question in the Change Healthcare survey hints at one of the challenges in assessing and inspiring patient engagement: “What is the best approach for turning passive patients into active healthcare consumers?”

For many years, my discussions with patient activists on social media have informed me about some of the toxic language that prevents trusted conversations between people – patients, consumers, caregivers — and health care providers, plans, and pharma. Words like “adherence,” “compliance,” and in this question the verb, “turning,” are turn-offs for the very people legacy healthcare organizations want to engage.

Contemporary health engagement for patients in the U.S. is also complicated by the fact that patients are responsible for financing at least part of their healthcare — resulting in self-rationing among a large percentage of people who truly need to access care, the CarePayment survey points out. We’ve seen these behaviors based on other data sources, notably over the years via the Kaiser Family Foundation which I perennially cover — even back in 2012 before the advent of the Affordable Care Act.

As providers, payors and pharma allocate capital resources for technology to improve relationships with patients on the hardware side of the ledger, these healthcare organizations should also be mindful of other processes and mindsets facing consumer-patients — both in terms of helping people navigate the healthcare system, and at the same time, avoid the financial toxicity that can prevent them from seeking care in the first place.


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Digital treatments can be real medicine

Digital treatments can be real medicine | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it

What if an app could replace a pill? That’s the big question behind an emerging trend known as “digital therapeutics.” The idea: software that can improve a person’s health as much as a drug can, but without the same cost and side-effects.

Digital therapeutics, or “digiceuticals,” as some call them, have become a Holy Grail in some quarters of Silicon Valley, where investors see the chance to deliver medicine through your smartphone. Andreessen Horowitz, the venture firm, even predicts digital drugs will become “the third phase” of medicine, meaning the successor to the chemical and protein drugs we have now, but without the billion-dollar cost of bringing one to market.  

 


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Is Pharma Socially Inhibited?

Is Pharma Socially Inhibited? | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
The Power of Social Media

Social media is one of the quickest and most direct ways of communication currently available. Whether people have questions and queries, or things go wrong, we should be able to have reasonable conversations over social media with any company. Social media has the power to build up and bring down the biggest of companies.

Engagement is Key

Pharma should become adept at communications over social media, so they can manage all requirements. A lack of engagement is an opportunity for misinformation, which can lead to a failure in understanding each other. When things are going well for a company, naturally this should be reflected across all social media, but when they aren’t, this should be addressed appropriately on there too. The way our industry deals with high profile problems is to shut down all engagement over social media, usually to avoid anyone admitting any responsibility and liability, and all communication is performed via their lawyers. Of course, there are times when lawyers are needed, but if brand loyalty has been built over time on social media, then any negativity would be dealt with more effectively. Moreover, communication is key to open and honest dialogue and more transparency.

Huge Opportunity for Pharma

Social media is here in a big way and it is not going anywhere anytime soon. It would be folly to ignore its potential to help shape the next era of communication. We have gone from mass outbound communication to a much more reactive and responsive form of communication because of social media. We now have the biggest opportunity that we have ever had to inform, educate, and engage with stakeholders. Opportunities to connect and engage with the audience should not be missed. Furthermore, there is slow but growing competition within the pharma industry, and if a few early adopters are on-board, it could be the game changer that our industry needs to drive itself forward.


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5 Ways Digital has Reshaped Pharma Marketing

5 Ways Digital has Reshaped Pharma Marketing | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it

Healthcare sector might be slow to adapt to the digital marketing revolution. But these days pharmaceutical marketing companies are making some big steps towards digitization and are quickly developing a series of innovative digital pharma marketing strategies.

 

But what is a digital pharma marketing strategy?
Digital pharma marketing is the marketing of pharmaceutical products or services by using digital technologies. These days, for instance, pharma digital marketing companies are providing customer service portals, live video reps, and e-sampling.

 

The new digital transformation in pharmaceutical marketing companies bringing both challenges and opportunities for pharma marketers. If you are finding it difficult to adapt to the big changes in healthcare marketing, don’t worry. Here’s a blog to guide you through the digital transformation in pharma. It will help you find your way through pharma marketing trends of tomorrow.
moPharma

 

 

Digital world is a visual world

People prefer to watch visual info rather than text. That’s why every modern pharma marketing campaign is based on the visual info, and a video is the best way to visualize your message.

Everybody love videos. Physicians, patients, search engines, social media and every other pillar of digital marketing. That’s why video has become a must-have element of every pharma digital marketing strategy.

 

Digital channels replaced regular forms of advertising

A recent study showed that pharmaceutical marketers are increasing their budgets for digital advertising. Pharmaceutical digital marketing and social media marketing budgets are getting larger as well.

These new pharma digital marketing trends represent the industry’s response to the changing world. A world where 72% of internet consumers are searching for medical information online and where 47% of them are searching info about HCPs, hospitals and other facilities online.

Pharma is also increasingly turning to digital advertising. And it’s relocating its efforts, personnel, and money to digital advertising channels.

 

Digitally savvy physicians

Physicians are spending most of their day on computers, tablets, and mobile phones. They no longer limit themselves to medical journals and printed publications. Today’s tech-savvy physicians are using Google to find clinical textbooks or medical journals.

That’s why digital pharma marketers are marketing to Google just as much as they do to physicians. Optimizing your pharma brand’s website is of vital importance for reaching modern HCPs.

Since physicians are turning to Google for medical information, pharma marketers are doing all they can to ensure that HCPs bump into their website when browsing the net. Getting doctors to visit your website is often half the work. The other half is getting them interested in your product.

 

 

Well informed consumers

There was a time when patients were limited to recommendation provided by doctors. These days people are likely to do their homework before they even enter that doctor’s office.

Today’s patients see healthcare as a collaboration between themselves and physicians. Patients are now consulting Google on issues that influence their health-related choices.

People are primarily Googling for specific diseases or medical conditions, but they are also searching for info about various treatments and procedures. Also, they base their choice of HCPs on the info they find on the internet.

 

Changing target audience

Nowadays healthcare marketers increasingly target consumers and payers with their campaigns. Doctor’s decision making is in many ways affected by patient’s health literacy and a well- informed patient always has a saying in the decision-making process.

Pharma marketing companies are using everything inbound has to offer, from email marketing and social media channels to video marketing and video campaigns. As healthcare sector is evolving, so is the relationship between physicians and sales reps. And a multi-channel approach is more likely to make an impact on pharma brand’s target audience.

Hope that this blog will help you make necessary changes in your digital pharma marketing strategy. And if you want to learn more about digital strategies in the pharmaceutical industry sign up here and learn all you need to know about digital marketing in pharma.


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digitalaplus's curator insight, September 6, 8:46 AM
These days pharmaceutical marketing companies are making some big steps towards digitization and are quickly developing a series of innovative digital pharma marketing strategies
digitalaplus's curator insight, September 6, 8:50 AM
These days pharmaceutical marketing companies are making some big steps towards digitization and are quickly developing a series of innovative digital pharma marketing strategies.
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Worth knowing: 5 Ways to Attract More Patients Online in 2018 

Worth knowing: 5 Ways to Attract More Patients Online in 2018  | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it

The New Year is a great opportunity to pause and think ‘big picture’ about your medical practice. It’s easy to get caught up in the day-to-day of running the practice – treating patients, managing staff, and putting out fires all day long. BUT what is the point of these daily efforts if ultimately they do not contribute toward a bigger, strategic plan?

At Red Castle Services, it is our firm belief that patient behavior is changing. Every year, more and more patients are searching for their next doctor ONLINE. Gone are the days when patients looked up the doctor’s number in a paper directory. Is this trend likely to stop? In a word, NO. So as a doctor, it’s very important that you are aware of this and start to strategically position your practice accordingly.

The good news is that the solution is really very simple and has just 2 basic components: First, make your practice easy for patients to find online. Second, make sure that what they find persuades them to schedule an appointment. But this is easier said than done. Below we explain some ideas which will help.

5 Ways to Attract More Patients Online in 2018 1. Medical SEO

It’s really very simple – with more and more patients looking for their next doctor online, you need to make your practice easy for patients to find online. One way to do this is medical SEO. In layman’s terms, medical SEO is the process of positioning your website at the top of online search results. It is common knowledge that Google is the most used search engine, so in terms of winning the most new patients, it makes sense to prioritize getting your practice’s website top of Google.


You are now probably wondering “how can I do medical SEO for my practice’s website?” There are several strategies, ranging from increasing backlinks to your site, improving your site’s content, changing backend settings, among others. However, a word of warning – be careful which SEO company you choose to work with, because using the wrong SEO strategies (essentially cheating the system) can lead to your site being blacklisted with Google. At Red Castle Services, we believe in authentic content creation – helping your site to have the best content, so that Google wants it to be at the top of Google. That’s why we have an in-house team of talented medical content writes who create content on the topics patients want to know about.

Read more about medical seo.

2. New Medical Website

So let’s say you successfully get your site to the top of Google. Thousands of patients are now visiting your site every month. BUT wait. Will patients actually like what they find? Your website is patients’ first impression of your practice – does your site really convey the image you want?

Plus does your site have the functionality which converts browsing into appointments? For example, is your site mobile friendly? As far back as 2015, Google reported that more searches take place on smart phones and tablets than on desktops. So if your site is NOT mobile friendly, then you are missing out on over 50% of your potential online patient referrals! Not sure if your site is mobile friendly or not? Here’s a free tool from Google to check.

Interested in giving your website a fresh lick of paint in 2018? See our medical website portfiolio or Contact Us.

3. Online Reputation

Let’s say it again: If patients don’t like what they find, then they won’t schedule an appointment. And this doesn’t just apply to your website. Try Googling the doctors in your practice now. Do you see that Google review which shows up? That’s exactly what patients see too.

Do you have a good rating? Doctors often come to us and ask us how to improve this rating. It can be very frustrating to them. Sometimes the patient was not even their patient and left a scathing review! It’s quite typical for happy patients to not post anything online, while unhappy patients tell the whole world!

The good news is that we have developed a system which collects real, authentic reviews from patients and posts them online, while simultaneously discouraging negative reviews from going online. Take a look at a sample of our work below:

Read more about Online Reputation Management for Doctors.

4. Social Media

I was never a big fan of social media marketing for doctors, because I never saw a big Return On Income. However, that was until I learned how much it helps with SEO. Social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn have very high Domain Authorities. This means that they are sites which Google ‘respects’. In other words, links from these sites are quite valuable and help to move your site up the search engine rankings.

An added bonus of social media campaigns is that they can be used to build online followings and to reinforce your practice’s brand. Want to be seen as the leading practice of your specialty in your area? Social media can help.

Read more about social media marketing for doctors.

5. Google Adwords / Facebook Advertising

If you need patients and need them fast, Google Adwords is a great option. It will leapfrog your website straight to the top of Google search engine results in the sponsored section. However, it comes at a cost. Each time someone clicks on those links, you’re charged a fee (often around $2 to $10 per click, depending on how competitive your keywords are).

Facebook advertising is another option, although personally I think it depends on your specialty. For example, if you’re an urgent care center, then I don’t see the value in Facebook advertising. Anyone who is injured will come to you (Google you) and not be inspired by a post on Facebook to suddenly pay you a visit. However, for more chronic conditions, Facebook advertising can be a good option. Let’s imagine someone who has been suffering with arthritis for several months or even years. Seeing a post on Facebook about how arthritis pain can be cured may indeed persuade them to call you. So for specialties like orthopedics and pain management (among others) it can be a good option.


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Digital Transformation of Healthcare: IoMT Connectivity, AI, and Value Streams

Digital Transformation of Healthcare: IoMT Connectivity, AI, and Value Streams | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
The Digital Transformation (DX) of Healthcare is imminent. A number of key advances in technology as well as digital transformation best practices are paving the way for a watershed year in Healthcare. In addition to the staggering and continuously rising cost of Healthcare, silos within Healthcare value streams as well errors in diagnostics and inconsistencies in patient data are some of the pervasive challenges in the healthcare industry. Consider this. Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the United States!

These formidable challenges of Healthcare impact our pocketbooks and wellness. However, the Digital Transformation of Healthcare is also becoming a reality with tremendous benefits to patients, providers, and payers. More specifically, three complimentary technologies are now the pillars for Healthcare DX:

1.Internet of Things Connected Wellness and Medical Devices: This year also at CES 2018 there were 200 Digital Health technologies focusing on Wellness and Medical Devices with concrete benefits for the consumer. In addition medical devices are becoming increasingly intelligent, connected, and robust for delivering optimized healthcare services. There is even an acronym for it: Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) that aggregates connectivity of medical devices with Information Technology (IT).

2. Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare: AI for discovering patterns from connected healthcare monitoring devices as well as patient transactions are providing tremendous opportunities for preventive care. There are many different types of AI preventive care models. In addition to aggregating and mining models from patient data another benefit of AI in healthcare is to opt for a system of continuous learning within the system itself. Furthermore, the knowledge harvested from various medical sources including patients, connected devices, and medical staff such as doctors and nurses, can be digitized and automated. The combination or even “champion challenge” between care options mined and discovered from patient data vs. the knowledge of experts (e.g. doctors and nurses) provides increased opportunities in optimizing the patient care.

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L’AP-HP lance le Digital Medical Hub

L’AP-HP lance le Digital Medical Hub | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
L’AP-HP, crée à l’hôpital Bichat – Claude-Bernard, la première plateforme d’évaluation et d’analyse des objets connectés en santé, le Digital Medical Hub.

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The Gap Between Real World Healthcare & Social Media

The Gap Between Real World Healthcare & Social Media | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it

Part of what I like to think makes my blog unique is that I’ve been a cancer patient as well as a clinician treating cancer patients. So, I have one foot in each camp, as it were.

This blog, and my introduction to social media, germinated almost ten years ago after I had been diagnosed with breast cancer in July of 2008. Desperate for help and information, I found my way, as many have and many will, to BreastCancer.org and it’s online, peer support community. Dozens, possibly hundreds, of the people I connected with in that community are still my friends online all these years later on other social media. Then and now, these friends help validate my experience and often provide helpful information about breast cancer and treatment and side effects and middle-of-the-night freaking out. Back then, communicating with them spurred me to start reading research studies again, which I hadn’t done much of since physical therapy graduate school. Because of that, I began to connect with clinical and medical and science websites, and with researchers who’d published interesting studies or were seeking study participants. One of the most helpful experiences I had early on was finding an online listing for two doctors within driving distance who were conducting a clinical trial on treating cancer related fatigue. Thus, I am one of the first people to extol the virtues of social media and of those of us who employ it to advocate for better healthcare.

But…

And it’s an important ‘but.’ I may write about healthcare here in cyberspace, but in my daily, real-world job, I work in the concrete world. I do connect with a secure server to upload my patient notes and download my schedule each day on my work laptop. And I email my colleagues and share a few pdf’s.

But my real work has little to do with zeroes and ones. I see patients of all ages, with all kinds of healthcare problems, in their homes, and try to teach them to walk better or not fall or to get out of bed without pain. And I have to tell you that, for most of them, social media has little to no impact on their experience of their own health and healthcare. A few of them might have a Fitbit. A few might have a patient portal account that they use to email their doctors’ offices or confirm upcoming appointments. And that’s about it.

The last thing that most, perhaps nearly all, of my patients would consider doing when they have a health crisis is to get online. You’d be forgiven for thinking this is an age thing, that it’s because most of my patients are elderly. And you’d be wrong. Sometimes, it does occur to a few of them, or to one of their family members or caregivers, to buy things like tub seats and walkers online. Most of the time, however, I have to tell them they can buy that stuff online. I have to tell the folks who have uncommon chronic diseases, or even common ones, that there are online communities that can help them feel less isolated. I have to tell them that there are websites for our state’s department of health, the department of elderly affairs, the local hospital or orthopedic practice, for Cancer.org, for the American Diabetes Association, etcetera, ad infinitum.

Pay No Attention to That Charlatan Behind the Curtain

Why don’t people get online for help with their health issues? Because they have health issues. Which means that they feel like shit, they’re exhausted, confused, overwhelmed, in pain, and generally gobsmacked. And the last thing they feel like doing is anything that does not immediately and concretely help them to feel better. And you know what? Mostly, I’m glad they don’t get online. I want them to listen to me and their doctors and nurses, and to follow our advice, not to read most of the execrable bullshit that passes on the web for healthcare information. I do not want them getting their health advice from the likes of Gwyneth Paltrow or Dr. Google. It’s bad enough that they watch TV. I wish I had a dollar for every time I’ve had to refute some nonsense a patient heard via Doctor Oz.

It’s hard enough for me to sort through the dross on the web to find the genuine nuggets. And I have an advanced degree in science. And I still get hoodwinked sometimes. But I also have online friends who are scientists, doctors, and intelligent healthcare journalists, and we help each other wade through the swamp.

That is not, however, true for most people. I have some very admirable friends online who have devoted themselves to improving health literacy, who work hard to improve their own, so that they can provide the patient’s perspective to researchers who design studies. But the odds that most of the thousands of people I have ever treated in the past twenty-five years could or would find their way to these web advocates or others like them is a snowball’s chance in hell. For real.

A Breed Apart

The thing to keep in mind is that those of us who are members of the healthcare social media community are not most people. Yet we may think we’re more important than we really are to most people. If there’s one thing that social media is good at, it’s declaring how important and influential social media is. And that’s true, up to a point. But we need a little humility, a little perspective about our role. When you have crushing, unrelenting chest pain, the sensible response is not to Tweet about it. You call a freaking ambulance.

I remember the first time I took a survey — one of several over the years — about how useful social media had been to me as a cancer patient. It was put together by a grad student who was working on her Ph.D. and whose mom had had breast cancer. It was pretty good. But when I got to the questions about who did the most to help me outlast cancer, or who I could most count on in a crisis, none of the answers included social media. The answers included the doctors and other clinicians who treated me, and the friends who drove me to see them. And yet, to hear some tell it, social media is going to save us all and reinvent the healthcare system. Really? Tell that to all my patients and work colleagues. Social media has facilitated awareness, research, and patient support. And it will continue to spur new and worthwhile ideas and projects. But the rest of the fix is not that simple.

In the Trenches

If you want to hear a passionate discussion about how to fix the healthcare system, talk to another clinician. And I don’t mean online. I mean in person, in a clinical setting or at a seminar. Or at the local pub over a beer or three. You’ve never heard intelligent snark like you’ll hear from us. A few of the doctors I’ve known over the years, who have also treated me as a patient, are especially enlightening. When I see them for a checkup, we often spend the first few minutes having a nice, soul-cleansing rant about it all. Do they check out social media for ways to further the cause? Hell, no. They have neither the time nor the energy. Frequently, neither do I. We’re all too busy trying to help our patients get better, or returning their phone calls, or typing notes about them on a computer, or wrangling with insurance companies and their criteria for reimbursement, or going to meetings and continuing ed seminars so we can remain competent enough to keep our licenses. On a daily, practical basis, has social media or digital documentation made our work easier or better? Not really.

I don’t have any immediate answers to this conundrum. And the ideas I have would require another blog post. But I can tell you one thing. When my patients improve, it has everything to do with how much access they feel they have to a real-world clinician who knows them, and how empowered they feel to take responsibility for their health. And then to do what they truly need to do in order to get better. And that’s where fostering the nexus between social media and the real world may be genuinely useful. Any and all ideas welcome. In the meantime, onward, friends.


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Quel traitement pour les données personnelles à l’heure du RGPD?

Quel traitement pour les données personnelles à l’heure du RGPD? | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it

PARIS (TICpharma) - A compter du 25 mai 2018, le règlement européen sur la protection des données personnelles (RGPD) s’appliquera à tous les acteurs traitant des données personnelles et notamment ceux du secteur de la santé. A deux mois de l’entrée en application du texte européen, comment s’organisent-ils?


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Amazon has quietly launched an exclusive line of over-the-counter health products

Amazon has quietly launched an exclusive line of over-the-counter health products | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
Amazon has quietly launched an exclusive line of over-the-counter health products  
6:41 PM ET Tue, 20 Feb 2018 | 00:51
Amazon has quietly launched an exclusive line of over-the-counter health products in a possible challenge to pharmacy retail chains that could spark a price war and put pressure on store-brand profit margins.

Technically, the company doesn't own these products, which are produced by private-label manufacturer Perrigo, but it does put Amazon in a position to squeeze other retailers. The e-commerce giant launched the Basic Care line in August, including 60 products ranging from ibuprofen to hair regrowth treatment.

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Digital Health Best Practices For Policy Makers: A Free Report

Digital Health Best Practices For Policy Makers: A Free Report | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
The Medical Futurist Institute collected great digital health policy examples worldwide. We hope to inspire policy-makers to take steps towards the future!

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Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Twitter, Amazon : qui possède quoi ? - Tech

Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Twitter, Amazon : qui possède quoi ? - Tech | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
Les géants de web possèdent de nombreuses filiales, entreprises et marques parfois dédiées à des services très différents de ce pour quoi on les connaît. Tour d'horizon.
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Chiffres clefs réseaux sociaux 2018

Chiffres clefs réseaux sociaux 2018 | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
Cette infographie résume les derniers chiffres-clefs à propos d'Internet et des médias sociaux, en France et dans le monde.
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Protection des #données de #santé : l’Assurance-maladie mise en demeure par la @CNIL #data #Esante #hcsmeufr 

Protection des #données de #santé : l’Assurance-maladie mise en demeure par la @CNIL #data #Esante #hcsmeufr  | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
Le régulateur des données personnelles a relevé « plusieurs insuffisances de sécurité susceptibles de fragiliser » un fichier informatique de l’Assurance-maladie contenant des données sur tous les Français.

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GIE_GERS's curator insight, February 27, 2:56 PM

Le régulateur des données personnelles a relevé « plusieurs insuffisances de sécurité susceptibles de fragiliser » un fichier informatique de l’Assurance-maladie contenant des données sur tous les Français.

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Diabetes and Social Media - A Study in the Middle East

Diabetes and Social Media - A Study in the Middle East | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it

Background: Diabetes is a major health care burden in the Middle East region. Social networking tools can contribute to the management of diabetes with improved educational and care outcomes using these popular tools in the region.

Objective: The objective of this review was to evaluate the impact of social networking interventions on the improvement of diabetes management and health outcomes in patients with diabetes in the Middle East.

Methods: Peer-reviewed articles from PubMed (1990-2017) and Google Scholar (1990-2017) were identified using various combinations of predefined terms and search criteria. The main inclusion criterion consisted of the use of social networking apps on mobile phones as the primary intervention. Outcomes were grouped according to study design, type of diabetes, category of technological intervention, location, and sample size.

Results: This review included 5 articles evaluating the use of social media tools in the management of diabetes in the Middle East. In most studies, the acceptance rate for the use of social networking to optimize the management of diabetes was relatively high. Diabetes-specific management tools such as the Saudi Arabia Networking for Aiding Diabetes and Diabetes Intelligent Management System for Iraq systems helped collect patient information and lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, respectively.

Conclusions: The reviewed studies demonstrated the potential of social networking tools being adopted in regions in the Middle East to improve the management of diabetes. Future studies consisting of larger sample sizes spanning multiple regions would provide further insight into the use of social media for improving patient outcomes.


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Good article, thanks for sharing. http://alliancexempire.com/
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Les investissements d'Apple et d'Amazon dans la santé annoncent une révolution

Les investissements d'Apple et d'Amazon dans la santé annoncent une révolution | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
Les géants de la tech voient dans la santé un marché en or, ce qui pourrait signifier des patients plus autonomes, un meilleur diagnostic des maladies et des coûts nettement inférieurs
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News Press - De nouvelles données révèlent l'existence de niveaux élevés de résistance aux antibiotiques dans le monde - OMS - Organisation Mondiale de la Santé

http://www.newspress.fr/common/getImageEm.ashx?imid=4498&emid=0783" />BANGKOK - Les premières données de surveillance de l'antibiorésistance publiées par l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé metten
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Role of Social Media in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

Role of Social Media in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Role of Social Media in Health care

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Apple will launch Health Records feature at 12 hospitals with iOS 11.3

Apple will launch Health Records feature at 12 hospitals with iOS 11.3 | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it
After many months of rumors, Apple announced today that it is launching a personal health record (PHR) feature with iOS 11.3, the beta of which launched today to users in Apple's iOS Developer Program.
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Kantar - These are the doctors tapping into social media

Kantar - These are the doctors tapping into social media | #DigitalHealthcare | Scoop.it

Advances in technology have changed healthcare practices and how doctors interact online. The widespread adoption of social networks is making a bigger impact on a physician’s day-to-day life, especially when consumers go online to look for health information and health providers.

Kantar Media's Healthcare Research Client Services division has gotten a clearer picture of how doctors are engaging with social media to interact with their peers and their patients. We also discovered which doctors are utilizing social media the most.

Importance of Social Media

Patients desire ways to connect with each other and healthcare professionals via social media. Therefore, it's crucial that doctors evolve their practices to meet this demand:

Nearly 3 out of 4 US adults indicate they typically go online for health and wellness purposes.32% conduct research online prior to a doctor’s appointment. 36% research treatment options on their own and then ask their doctor about them.53% value social content/sharing websites as a source for health information (e.g., social networking sites, references websites with user-generated content, drug review/ratings websites, online blogs or online communities/support groups)69% of all adults indicate they have caught up or posted on a social network from a computer or mobile device within the last monthSource: Kantar Media’s 2017 MARS Consumer Health Study

How Doctors Interact with Patients and Peers

According to Kantar Media’s 2017 Medical Surgical Sources and Interactions study, healthcare professionals are finding effective ways to utilize social media. For example, nearly half of all physicians surveyed (47%) say they have posted, followed or communicated with colleagues on professional social networks in the past 30 days via a computer or mobile device.


When communicating with healthcare consumers, nearly half of all doctors surveyed indicate they use a patient portal to interact with patients. Additionally, 7% say they use social media to communicate with specific patients or to promote their practice with a broad group of patients (an increase of one percentage point since last year). 

Which Doctors Value Social Media

18% of all doctors say they value Social Communities/Networks as a source of professional information. Of these:

43% are age <45 (132 index compared to total doctors surveyed)39% are female (135 index compared to total doctors surveyed)46% see over 100 patients in an average week
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