San Jose Sharks - NHL
34 views | +0 today
Follow
San Jose Sharks - NHL
All Sharks, all the time - Lets Go Sharks!
Curated by Jeff Underhill
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jeff Underhill
Scoop.it!

Crosby Deal Becomes Official

Crosby Deal Becomes Official | San Jose Sharks - NHL | Scoop.it
Crosby Deal Becomes Official (RT @pghpenguins: It's official.Crosby signs 12-year, $104.4 million deal to be a Penguin forever: http://t.co/FzpYFsbm #Pens...)...
more...
Scooped by Jeff Underhill
Scoop.it!

NHL Free Agency 2012: 20 Veterans Who Should Be on the Move - Bleacher Report

NHL Free Agency 2012: 20 Veterans Who Should Be on the Move - Bleacher Report | San Jose Sharks - NHL | Scoop.it
Bleacher ReportNHL Free Agency 2012: 20 Veterans Who Should Be on the MoveBleacher ReportCommencing July 1, the NHL free agency is sure to shake up almost every NHL locker room in a major way.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Underhill
Scoop.it!

NHL: Kings hit reset button, with finals in their grasp - San Gabriel Valley Tribune

NHL: Kings hit reset button, with finals in their grasp - San Gabriel Valley Tribune | San Jose Sharks - NHL | Scoop.it
NBCSports.comNHL: Kings hit reset button, with finals in their graspSan Gabriel Valley TribuneBy Andrew Knoll, Correspondent Kings goalie Jonathan Quick keeps his eye on the puck during Game 3 of the Stanley Cup Western Conference finals against...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Underhill
Scoop.it!

Well-rested Coyotes ready to get back on ice - NHL.com

Well-rested Coyotes ready to get back on ice - NHL.com | San Jose Sharks - NHL | Scoop.it
Bleacher ReportWell-rested Coyotes ready to get back on iceNHL.comBy Jerry Brown - NHL.com Correspondent GLENDALE, Ariz.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Underhill
Scoop.it!

Stuart pondering his future - Comcast SportsNet Bay Area

Stuart pondering his future - Comcast SportsNet Bay Area | San Jose Sharks - NHL | Scoop.it
Stuart pondering his futureComcast SportsNet Bay AreaOne name that has been linked to the San Jose Sharks in recent months is that of defenseman Brad Stuart, who just completed a four-year contract with the Detroit Red Wings and is set to hit the...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Underhill
Scoop.it!

Amazon.com: Skinit San Jose Sharks Home Jersey Vinyl Skin for Amazon Kindle Fire: Electronics

Amazon.com: Skinit San Jose Sharks Home Jersey Vinyl Skin for Amazon Kindle Fire: Electronics (Skinit San Jose Sharks Home Jersey Vinyl Skin for Amazon Kindle Fire: Skinit allow you to personalize and protec...)...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Underhill
Scoop.it!

Sharks add that grit by signing free agent Adam Burish to four-year, $7.2 million contract

Feeding three beasts: Twitter, online edition of Merc and Working the Corners.
more...
Scooped by Jeff Underhill
Scoop.it!

Does NHL's CBA notice mean league is facing another lockout? - Pittsburgh Post Gazette (blog)

Does NHL's CBA notice mean league is facing another lockout? - Pittsburgh Post Gazette (blog) | San Jose Sharks - NHL | Scoop.it
SB NationDoes NHL's CBA notice mean league is facing another lockout?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Underhill
Scoop.it!

NHL'S CBA COULD GO MLB ROUTE, OR THAT OF NFL & NBA - Sportsnet.ca

NHL'S CBA COULD GO MLB ROUTE, OR THAT OF NFL & NBA - Sportsnet.ca | San Jose Sharks - NHL | Scoop.it
Bleacher ReportNHL'S CBA COULD GO MLB ROUTE, OR THAT OF NFL & NBASportsnet.caThe Montreal Gazette points out that we got an inkling of what NHL players don't want in the upcoming collective bargaining agreement from Steve Fehr, the NHLPA special...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Underhill
Scoop.it!

Bladesofteal: My Two Cents: Hard Lessons for Sharks; LA Kings in WCF; USA over Canada in WHC; Fall of an Icon

Sharks Lessons Learned: It has been over two weeks since the Sharks were dismissed from this years post season by the St Louis Blues. As the series starts to fade away into the oblivion as does this past season, I’ve had a good amount of time to clear my head and get team teal’s failures far enough out of mind to where I can look back on things that happened objectively. Hopefully over time the Sharks coaching staff and players have had some time to get away and do some reflection of their own. This is not an easy time to be a San Jose Sharks player, coach or even fan right now. The team that showed you the door this post season just got swept out of the post season themselves by the LA Kings. Another team in the same division, the Phoenix Coyotes, are just a win away from joining the LA Kings in the Western Conference Final and being part of this seasons’ “final four” in the NHL, with one of those two teams being guaranteed a finals appearance and a 50/50 shot at winning the Stanley Cup.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeff Underhill
Scoop.it!

Want to sit at the end of the ice where the Sharks shoot twice? It’ll cost you more next season | Working the Corners

Posted by David Pollak on May 7th, 2012 at 7:24 pm | Categorized as General, Hockey, NHL, Sharks, Sports

 

The Sharks are mailing invoices to season-ticket holders this week and it’s anything but the same old, same old inside each packet.

Oh, the price increase that most have grown accustomed to will be there in almost every case, about 6.5 percent overall.

But for the first time, comparable tickets will cost more if the seats are in the end of the ice where the Sharks shoot twice, one more twist in the variable pricing systems that have taken over pro sports in recent years. In fact, the Sharks are only following the same path taken by 15 other NHL teams.

In addition, they’ve increased the number of price levels from 11 to 18, in part because of the premium on sitting in San Jose’s offensive zone for two-thirds of the game, in to reduce the disparity in value within the existing pricing set-up.

Not sure when it will be posted, but here’s a copy of a story I just filed for our web site. And I’ll tag on a few notes at the end:

By David Pollak
dpollak@mercurynews.com

Tickets to comparable seats for a Sharks game next season will cost more in the end of the rink where the home team shoots twice.

“We’ve structured our seating so it’s priced higher for the attack end and not as high for the non-attack end,” executive vice-president for business Malcolm Bordelon said. “It’s far and away the preferred location for fans of all walks in life and has become a common process around the league.”

Bordelon said 15 other NHL teams already have a similar system in place and others are expected to make the change this summer, all part of the variable pricing trend in pro sports that factors in supply and demand. The price gap depending on which end zone the seat is in will be $1 to $4.

Season-ticket holders will receive their invoices this week for 2012-13. Overall, prices are going up about 6.5 percent – though that figure will vary more than ever from section to section. Pricing for single-game seats will not be announced until after the schedule is announced and for a second season will be determined by opponent, night of the week and demand.

Fans who do not want to pay extra for sitting in the attack zone during the first and third periods will have the opportunity to switch their seats to the opposite end of the ice.

“If it’s a pain threshold issue – and I don’t think it went up that dramatically – but if someone in 212 said I don’t want to go that far, we can move you to 218 and the price is the same as it was last year,” . Just not at the shoot-twice end.

In addition, the Sharks have also increased the number of distinct ticket price levels at HP Pavilion from 11 to 18.

“It’s going to allow us to price more accurately based on seating location,” director of ticket sales John Castro said. As an example, he noted that a ticket in the second row at center ice in the upper bowl has always cost the same as one in the twelfth of a corner section.

“We think that’s not very consistent in terms of what it should be priced,” he added.

As an example, Castro noted that the sideline upper bowl seats stretched from section 212 to 218 until now and cost season-ticket holders $53 each. Going forward, it’ll be broken into three different price ranges with 212 and 213 considered the attack zone ($56), 214-216 center ice ($59), and 217 and 218 in the non-attack end (no increase at $53).

In the lower bowl, a reserved seat that cost $75 last season will cost $80 in the attack-twice zone and $76 at the other end.

Club seats will be the same at either end of the rink because they carry additional perks; those at center ice are increasing from $122 to $130 while those in the corner and ends are going from $112 to $120. The biggest increase next season will be for club seats on the glass, a $20 bump to $192 each.

Bordelon said the staff has looked into the change in pricing for the last few years and decided this was the time to implement it with ownership’s blessing.

“Every business is expected to generate additional revenue,” he said. “We wanted to do it in a fashion that we could still achieve the revenue goal we wanted to achieve, make it as palatable as possible and — of course, as anybody does – capitalize on the most appealing inventory.”

He likened it to hotels charging extra for identical rooms with better views.

The decision had to be made, Bordelon said, before the Sharks’ early playoff exit — and that means the team’s post-season performance can never really be much of a factor in pricing.

*****Season-ticket holders — full and partial — currently occupy 13,950 of the 17,562 seats inside HP Pavilion. That number has continued to creep slightly higher each year, but it will be interesting to see what direction it goes after the disappointment of last season.

*****Bordelon noted that the Philadelphia Flyers take variable pricing to the next level. Each row in the upper bowl, he said, costs somewhat less than the row in front of it.

*****He also talked a little bit about the overall economics and why teams bump up prices even when they know the fan base is upset by performance on the field or on the ice.

“Nobody wants to raise prices. I know every team says that every year and it’s true. We don’t want to, but our costs go up – everything goes up whether it’s our travel cos,ts or our insurance or our equipment or our medical,” Bordelon said.

The Sharks, he added, have to be even more careful because some other buildings around the NHL have revenue coming in from an additional 1,500 to 2,000 seats.

“We are trying to maximize as best we can without going to the point where – and I hate to say the word gouge – but we don’t want to get there and keep it as reasonable as we possibly can.”

Bordelon said the staff developed the pricing system, then took it to owners Kevin Compton and Stratton Sclavos for review. Ownership, Bordelon added, didn’t set a dollar-amount for ticket revenue that needed to be reached.

“It’s not you’ve got to go hit that number,” he said. “It’s what do you think you can do. If we’re pushed a little – you can do better here, you can do better there – it has to make logical sense.”

more...
No comment yet.