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Somos Medicina: Redes Sociales y estudiantes de Medicina, educación en privacidad

Somos Medicina: Redes Sociales y estudiantes de Medicina, educación en privacidad | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it

Uno de los temas que planteamos en el debate sobre educación médica de Salud 2.0 Euskadi, fue la necesidad imperiosa de que las Universidades eduquen a sus alumnos en el correcto uso de las herramientas digitales en Medicina, para lograr que la eSalud sea segura.

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Social Media Influencers in Healthcare and Pharma

Social Media Influencers in Healthcare and Pharma | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it

What exactly is a social media influencer?

A social media influencer is a person who has built a reputation as being a credible source of information online.

Social media influencers build relationships with their readers and followers that lead to engagement.And social media influencers hold sway with their readers and followers when it comes to making buying decisions in their particular niche or community.

But do social media influencers play the same kind of role when it comes to healthcare and pharma? Let’s take a look.

 

Quantifying social media influencers’ impact on awareness and sales

Social media influencers can be found on every social media platform. – Source

 

Looking to social media influencers for advice makes sense when you’re shopping for fashionable jeans, your next great vacation, or even inspiration for your fitness regime. Most retail brands agree.

According to the research firm L2 Gartner, 70% of retail brands are working with influencers through Instagram partnerships. Why Instagram? Because 72% of Instagram users say they’ve made a purchasing decision based on something they saw there.

Only friends and family hold more sway than social media influencers in the purchasing decision. – Source

 

The PR and content agency, Good Relations, conducted a survey of 1,000 consumers. In their

Good Influence Survey 2017, they found that 57% of those surveyed bought something solely on the recommendation of a social media influencer. Only friends and family had more sway (83%) regarding purchasing decisions.

When looking at which segments were most important to consumers by age, they found:

18-24 year olds were most interested in what social media influencers had to say about entertainment, retail, and tech;35-45 year olds focused mostly on food; andThose over 45 focused on health and travel.

While health may not be at the top of everyone’s list of interests, there is plenty of evidence that when faced with a health issue people turn to the internet and social media for information. Studies by Pew Research Center and PwC Health Researchfound that:

35% of adults in the US have gone online specifically to “figure out” some medical condition.16% of internet users went online in the last year to find others who might share the same health concerns.Nearly 90% of people in aged 18-24 (i.e., millennials) would trust health information or engage in health activities found on social media.

Health and its related topics are part of the mix for all age groups when it comes to social media.

 

The unique social media influencer landscape for healthcare and pharma

Certain aspects of healthcare and pharma (among them government regulations) have traditionally presented marketers with a challenge when trying to connect with their target audience.

Now with the vast majority of people turning to the Internet for health information, the way people shop for healthcare and pharma is beginning to resemble retail.

Significant numbers of people look for info about patients’ experiences online – Source

 

Social media is having an impact on the doctor-patient conversation. By sharing information and experiences, social media influencers shape the expectations and questions their followers have for their doctors. But their impact isn’t limited to the doctor’s office and the pharmacy counter.

Social media influencers are also having an impact on B2B companies. With their mentions of cutting edge technologies and services not directly available to the consumer social media influencers are creating expectations and building demand among patients that can only be addressed by payers, insurers, and providers. 

Social media influencers come from many different walks of life. – Source

 

Professionals, advocates, and patients replace tastemakers

As people search online for information related to their health concern they are finding the mix of social media influencer for healthcare and pharma differs from the retail space. Instead of tastemakers, healthcare and pharma social media influencers include industry experts, researchers, policy makers, medical professionals, advocates, and patients.

Some of these social media influencers base their insights on professional experience and formal education. For others their insights are based on personal experience and independent study.

 

Regulatory restrictions shape social media influence in healthcare and pharma

Another thing that distinguishes social media influencers for healthcare and pharma is the regulatory restrictions they face. In addition to the FTC’s disclosure requirements, some communications about pharma and medical devices are subject to FDA guidance.

Earlier this year, Kim Kardashian faced push back on an ongoing campaign for Diclegis that generated an FDA warning letter two years ago. Operating in a regulated industry, it’s understandable that some brands and social media influencers are concerned about the negative consequences of a poorly conceived or poorly executed campaign.

Brands and social media influencers can navigate these dangers by practicing transparency and authenticity, along with always complying with regulatory requirements.

 

Facebook is the most popular social platform among patient influencers

While Instagram is the dominant channel for retail social media influencers, many health industry expert, researcher, policy maker, and medical professional social media influencers can be found on Twitter.

WEGO Health found that patients and caregivers identified Facebook as their top channel for sharing information about health-related topics.

Patients and caregivers prefer Facebook for health information. – Source

 

Health agencies now recognize the positive impact of social media’s influence

National and transnational health agencies have gone beyond recognizing the impact of social media to encouraging its use to provide health education and emergency notifications. Both the CDC and WHO formally recognize the potential for social media, and presumably social media influencers, for reaching underrepresented and hard-to-reach communities and individuals.

 

Social media provides opportunities to do more by doing good

When used as an educational platform, social media presents an opportunity for social media influencers to do more than encourage people to buy a product or service. It presents healthcare and pharma social media influencers with the opportunity to do good and improve lives.

Doing good can mean reaching out with a health awareness campaign like #AdvocateForArthritis, or soliciting donations to pay for healthcare and supplies when disaster hits, or  recruiting underrepresented patient groups for drug trials.

Social media influencers can do more than influence buying decisions, they can help those in need. – Source

 

Engaging social media influencers in healthcare and pharma for bigger impacts

 

 The traditional social media influencer engagement models are familiar

When establishing a social media influencer program, most marketers think of inviting influencers to the program/campaign and events, providing influencers with gifts or benefits, co-creating content, and providing influencers with financial compensation for their promotional efforts. These are the traditional way of engaging the services of an influencer.

 

Today’s social media influencer engagement model has expanded

At its 2017 Influencer Marketing Huddle, Onalytica identified seven main engagement models for brands working with social media influencers. Not all of these models are generally recognized.

Not all social media influencer engagement models are widely recognized. – Source: Onalytica

 

Within these seven models, social media influencers can act as an advocate for the health issue or condition that they care about. Acting as an advocate drivers deeper relationships. L2 Garner reports, advocate influencers generate the strongest relationships with an 8% rate of engagement as compared to celebrities that generate a 1.6% rate of engagement.

Let’s break down each of the seven models to better understand the role of social media influencers:

 

Model #1: Community engagement

By following and engaging with healthcare and patient communities online, brands have an opportunity to listen as well as share their message.

Start with social listening. Listen for topics and issues that are important to your customer. Listen for more than mentions of your and your competitor’s brand. Listen for how your brand and industry are regarded by the community. Use what you learn to inform your message. And find ways to address your customer’s concerns.

With 20% of consumers online joining social media forums or healthcare communities, these communities provide plenty of opportunity to share information and support in a targeted manner. Among people with chronic conditions, 25% turn to social media to find people facing similar health issues, many find them in healthcare communities.

Community engagement may even help you find your ideal social media influencer to partner with.

People are using social media to find information about and support for health issues. – Source

 

Model #2: Employee advocacy

When social media influencers are matched with internal SMEs and evangelists the result can be highly engaging, informative media. Hospitals are making use of Facebook Live to produce must-see TV with patient social media influencers.

The NICU department of Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin partnered with a preemie mom to broadcast the story of #BabyMadeline – Source

 

Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin partnered a preemie mom with SMEs from their NICU to broadcast the story of #BabyMadeline on Periscope. Over three days the project generated 994 total viewers. These results convinced Children’s Hospital to continue broadcasting. They now broadcast demonstrations and Q&A sessions via Facebook Live generating organic views in the four figures and organic reach in the five figures.

The Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin has generated impressive reach with its Facebook Live broadcasts. – Source

 

Model #3: Invite influencers to your event

Inviting social media influencers to your event is one of the most traditional ways to engage with influencers.

Having a notable person in attendance adds a spark to the event, both while it’s happening and afterward. An opportunity to meet and take a photo with a notable person adds excitement for those at your event. After the fact, your event will likely receive continued mentions in social media, both in the influencer’s and your attendees’ feeds.

 

Model #4: Create influencer generated content

People put more trust in user generated content (UGC) than content created by a brand. By extension, influencer generated content (IGC) is also more trusted.

One of the most successful ICG campaigns ever was the ALS ice bucket challenge. Once the former Boston College baseball player and ALS patient Pete Frates took the challenge and shared it on YouTube the campaign took off like wildfire. Eventually, it raised $115 million for the ALS Foundation.

The advantage ICG campaigns have over UGC is two-fold. First, influencers are reliable leaders in their communities. They already have a built-in audience who is engaged in their niche. And second, an ICG lends itself better to coordination. It’s easier to stay on-message when working with a particular influencer instead of leaving the campaign to spread organically.

People put more trust in content created by users. – Source

 

Model #5: Invite influencers to your program

Inviting an influencer to your program in a defined role, like brand ambassador, is another traditional approach to engagement.

This approach establishes a formal relationship between your brand and the influencer. Depending on how you define the program the influencer can be called upon to make appearances, create and share content, or something else. Because the association is so explicit, it’s important to have a good fit between the brand and its message and the influencer and their image.

 

Model #6: Gifting/benefits

Many brands provide influencers with gifts with the expectation that the influencer will share something good about the brand with their audience. Such gifts can include swag or a trial version of their product or service.

This can be a bit of a risky approach. There’s no guarantee that the influencer will share anything about the brand or product with their audience. And there’s no guarantee that what they share will be positive. It’s prudent to be clear about expectations up front.

 

Model #7: Financial compensation

Finally, a brand can simply hire an influencer outright and pay them for their efforts. This financial compensation can be in exchange for making appearances, generating and sharing social media content, participating in focus groups, or any number of activities aimed at promoting your brand.

This model of engagement can be akin to hiring a spokesperson. And just as with working with a spokesperson, the relationship with the social media influencer must be disclosed.

 

Some cautions that apply when working with social media influencers

Regardless of the engagement model used, brands see a clear benefit to engaging with social media influencers when it results in their message being amplified and followers making purchases.

Don’t lose sight of the fact that working with social media influencers needs to be a two-way relationship. Both the brand and the social media influencer need to benefit in some way.

Also, whenever social media influencers and brands enter into a relationship they are required by the FTC to clearly and conspicuously disclose that relationship.

 

The impact of social media influencers is being felt in healthcare and pharma

With social media influencers freely sharing their experiences and knowledge online, their followers are demanding more from their healthcare providers. The nature the conversation between doctors and patients has changed.

We’ve also seen indications that healthcare and pharma are moving toward a purchasing model that is more like retail. Patients now research their options for and make decisions about healthcare providers and medical treatments based on what they learn in social media.

Perhaps it isn’t surprising that national and transnational health agencies are actually engaging in social media to influence people’s health now that they’ve seen the benefit.

Looking ahead, social media platforms will continue to evolve. Ten years ago Instagram didn’t even exist. But it’s unlikely that social media influencers will ever go away completely, not even in healthcare and pharma.


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Patient Engagement Survey: Social Networks to Improve Patient Health

Patient Engagement Survey: Social Networks to Improve Patient Health | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it

In our most recent NEJM Catalyst Insights Council Patient Engagement Survey, “Social Networks to Improve Patient Health,” 99% of respondents acknowledge that social networks are potentially useful in health care delivery, especially for chronic disease management (named by 85% of respondents) and promotion of healthy behaviors such as weight loss, physical activity, and healthy eating (78%).

The NEJM Catalyst Insights Council members surveyed — composed of health care executives, clinical leaders, and clinicians — see significant opportunity to improve health by either building or leveraging existing social networks. The seminal research by the medical sociologist Nicholas Christakis shows the strong linkage of behaviors leading to obesity, smoking, and alcohol use within social networks.

Approximately three-fourths of Insights Council member respondents report their organization uses some type of social network as part of their care delivery initiatives, but 90% say these are not yet mature or only slightly mature.”

Facebook and other social media sites illustrate in everyday life the power of social connectedness and the influences individuals have on one another’s behavior. Historically, care delivery has focused exclusively on individual patients. Awareness is growing that social networks in health care, such as PatientsLikeMe and Connected Living, can help people improve health behaviors. Peer networks can provide information and community to patients who otherwise might struggle alone with a new or existing disease.

From the Patient Engagement Insights Report: Social Networks to Incent Better Health. Click To Enlarge.

 

Approximately three-fourths of Insights Council member respondents report their organization uses some type of social network as part of their care delivery platforms, but 90% report that these approaches are not yet mature or only slightly mature. However, more than 60% of respondents believe that when social networks do mature, the impact on patient engagement, quality of care, and provider engagement will be major to moderate — a significant endorsement of the potential of social networks in support of patient health.

Why are clinicians and health care leaders interested in tapping into social networks? The most obvious reason is that health systems have begun to take on financial risk for populations of patients. When health systems assume risk, they are no longer focused solely on treating disease and are incented to consider an array of options for keeping people healthy. Social networks provide the opportunity for innovative care at a relatively low cost (respondents score cost investment lowest among challenges to scaling these tools). Insights Council members single out disease-specific patient support groups and caregiver support groups as the social network approaches with the most potential (chosen by 75% and 66% of respondents, respectively).

Patients, physicians, and nurses — voted the top three parties who should be involved in developing social networks — will have to give careful thought how to make best use of these platforms. They will have to consider which tools they should use, whether to build or buy, how to integrate into workflows, and how to engage providers and patients successfully and sustainably. ”

Face-to-face communication (whether through group sessions or trainings) is named as the most useful mode of communication for social networks (by 69% of respondents). However, it seems inevitable that technology developments and an effort to more meaningfully engage younger patients will push virtual connections, such as social media sites, higher on the list. Social media platforms are a potentially more stable channel for connections with and among patients. For example, people switch cell phone numbers more frequently (largely due to cost issues) than they do Facebook user names.

In verbatim comments, some survey respondents express concern about HIPAA and other privacy regulations in the use of social media sites. It must be acknowledged, though, that for many years patients have been tapping into social networks such as Alcoholics Anonymous, without concerns about privacy being a barrier. What has been missing is the formal involvement and endorsement by health systems. Insights Council respondents also say they are worried patients will receive flawed information about their diagnosis and treatment on social networks. Council members also are looking for reimbursement models that justify the time necessary to develop, implement, and measure the impact of social networks.

Patients, physicians, and nurses — voted the top three parties who should be involved in developing social networks — will have to give careful thought how to make best use of these platforms. They will have to consider which tools they should use, whether to build or buy, how to integrate into workflows, and how to engage providers and patients successfully and sustainably. We are in the initial stages of this work and look forward to supporting maturation of social networks to improve outcomes.

VERBATIM COMMENTS FROM SURVEY RESPONDENTS

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Parkinson's Digital Challenge Uses Mobile, Remote Data to Monitor Health

Parkinson's Digital Challenge Uses Mobile, Remote Data to Monitor Health | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
The Parkinson’s Disease Digital Biomarker DREAM Challenge was just launched by Sage Bionetworks as the first of a series of open, crowd-funded projects designed to help researchers identify ways to use smartphones and remote sensing devices to monitor health and disease.The first DREAM Challenge will focus on using sensors to identify aspects of Parkinson’s disease (PD) severity. Results, which are expected this fall, should provide best practices and tools to advance the development of Parkinson’s digital biomarkers, as well as to advance the mobile health community.
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Google: We're not a big healthcare company... yet - PMLiVE

Google: We're not a big healthcare company... yet - PMLiVE | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
Published earlier this year, Connected World explores the consequences of the digital age, moving with ease from the death of privacy to the rise of artificial intelligence.For its ‘in conversation’ format author Philip Larrey, the chair of logic at the Pontifical Lateran University, speaks to a cast of luminaries that includes Alphabet’s Eric Schmidt and WPP’s Sir Martin Sorrell.It’s the interview with Schmidt that is particularly pertinent for these pages, not least given a recent EY report, which concludes: “Make no mistake: technology firms, wellness companies and other non-traditional players awash in consumer and patient data are encroaching on traditional biopharmaceutical territory.”
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What's up with Apple in healthcare?

What's up with Apple in healthcare? | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
In recent months, Apple has been sending out smoke signals suggesting a major thrust into healthcare. The tech giant has bolstered its health team with four recent high-profile hires and forged partnerships with large healthcare systems. These include a clinical trial partnership with Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital and a precision medicine initiative with Scripps Translational Science Institute, according to Politico.The company has also partnered with IBM, Johnson & Johnson and Medtronic on cognitive computing platform called Watson Health Cloud. The platform offers tailored data analytics services to clinicians.
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Better information would improve cancer management, according to PatientView survey

Better information would improve cancer management, according to PatientView survey | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it

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PatientView's curator insight, October 7, 2016 6:41 AM

Survey done w/ support from @AstraZeneca shows #cancer patients want easier to understand, actionable info on disease and treatment

rob halkes's curator insight, October 7, 2016 8:58 AM

The more cooperation between patient groups and health industry, the more the really relevant and significant information can be researched to better health outcomes!

rob halkes's curator insight, October 7, 2016 9:06 AM

Grt example of how big pharma supports healthcare provision, by generating significant patient needs!

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What do health care, Uber, and Airbnb have in common? A talk on networked medicine

What do health care, Uber, and Airbnb have in common? A talk on networked medicine | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
How could health care be more like Uber? What could it learn from Airbnb? Sitting in the heart of Silicon Valley, Medicine X would hardly be complete without a panel mentioning such companies. Luckily, Jonathan Bush‘s Saturday morning keynote embraced the questions and discussed bringing “the network effect” to health care, with a rollicking sense of humor to boot.Bush, founder and CEO of athenahealth, extolled the network as the principle by which supply and demand can be re-calibrated in real time, just like Uber does with auto transport and Airbnb does with temporary housing. Who is looking for what? Where, when, and at what price? What resources are sitting unused? By collecting this data via smart phones, and connecting such clients with providers who can meet their needs, health care could be immensely more efficient, responsive, and affordable, Bush argued.
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Digital Health: Design for Patients, Not the Problem 

Digital Health: Design for Patients, Not the Problem  | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it

Here’s a surprising stat: Almost half of the American population suffers from chronic illness. Here’s an even more surprising stat: almost one in four Americans (approximately 75 million people) have multiple chronic conditions. And here’s an alarming one: chronic illness (ex: hypertension, respiratory diseases, arthritis, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, dementia) is the leading cause of death and disability in the U.S.

 

The good news: technology has enabled a burgeoning universe of digital solves to help patients manage their health. This universe, though still in its relative infancy, is huge: there are over 165,000 apps and digital services ranging from basic tools such as fitness trackers to research platforms connecting patients with doctors.


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Rebel Rebel: Can Pharma ever be true innovators in digital health?

Rebel Rebel: Can Pharma ever be true innovators in digital health? | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
The term innovation belongs to that congregation of clichés that can be lazily used to evoke a sense of modernity and progression, often within industries or professions better known for conservatism and resistance to change. What actually is innovation? There are hundreds of definitions available, with the consensus describing innovation as the creation of better solutions to new or existing problems or needs that can take the form of products, processes, services or technologies. On the face of it medicine and technology rely on innovation and Pharma relies on both in order to survive. It should be a marriage made in hesThe term innovation belongs to that congregation of clichés that can be lazily used to evoke a sense of modernity and progression, often within industries or professions better known for conservatism and resistance to change. What actually is innovation? There are hundreds of definitions available, with the consensus describing innovation as the creation of better solutions to new or existing problems or needs that can take the form of products, processes, services or technologies. On the face of it medicine and technology rely on innovation and Pharma relies on both in order to survive. It should be a marriage made in heaven...
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, May 31, 2016 7:12 AM

Alex Butler, former Digital Strategy and Social Media Manager at Janssen UK, received the "shirt off my back" during the 4th Annual Digital Pharma East conference for innovation in pharma social media marketing. More about that here: http://bit.ly/firstpgsmpa 

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Why Healthcare Brands Must Create Exceptional Content [Infographic]

Why Healthcare Brands Must Create Exceptional Content [Infographic] | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
Healthcare brands must create exceptional content. Learn why great content is essential with MDG's new infographic.

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How Bayer transformed its approach to digital

How Bayer transformed its approach to digital | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it

Bayer builds digital into its marketing DNA https://t.co/iTr2ROlQvm. #bayer #digitalmarketing #pharma


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Patient engagement strategies in a digital environment: Life sciences companies respond to changing patient expectations

Patient engagement strategies in a digital environment: Life sciences companies respond to changing patient expectations | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
In a shifting health care landscape, nontraditional players are trying to frame patient engagement strategies that are focused on providing patients solutions that are coordinated, convenient, customized, and accessible.

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Does mobile health technology help the heart?

Does mobile health technology help the heart? | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
Wearable health trackers and Smartphone apps have taken the world by storm in recent years. Around 20% of Smartphone users have one or more health apps on their device, and a 2014 report by Nielsen found 1 in 6 of us use wearable technology - such as fitness trackers - on a daily basis.

According to the authors of the American Heart Association (AHA) statement - including Lora E. Burke of the University of Pittsburgh, PA - the most popular self-monitoring devices and apps are those that track physical activity or heart rate. But do such technologies have a direct impact on heart health?

For their study, Burke and colleagues reviewed a number of meta-analyses and randomized clinical trials of mobile health technologies that had been conducted over the past 10 years.

They investigated how such technologies influenced improvement in risk factors for heart health, as determined by the AHA's Life's Simple 7: eating healthily, increasing physical activity, weight management, avoidance of tobacco smoke, reducing blood sugar, cholesterol control and blood pressure control.

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The FDA Is Tackling Digital Health With the Help of Apple and Google

The FDA Is Tackling Digital Health With the Help of Apple and Google | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
The regulator wants to cut through the red tape in a move aimed at advancing digital health products.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which is responsible for drug approvals, medical devices, and the food supply in the U.S., has announced a pilot project aimed at updating the process for approving software-based medical apps and devices. The agency plans to develop a framework that would bypass the traditional process used for drugs and more complex medical equipment.

The regulator revealed it has chosen nine companies that would participate in the initiative from more than 100 that applied. This includes heavy hitters in health Johnson & Johnson and Roche Holding AG. The list also includes well-known tech titans Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL), Samsung, and Verily Life Sciences, a division of Google parent Alphabet Inc.(NASDAQ:GOOGL) (NASDAQ:GOOG). Rounding out the top six is fitness-tracking pioneer Fitbit. The remaining three are start-ups Pear Therapeutics, Phosphorus, and Tidepool. 


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Participatory Disease Surveillance: Engaging Communities Directly in Reporting, Monitoring, and Responding to Health Threats

Participatory Disease Surveillance: Engaging Communities Directly in Reporting, Monitoring, and Responding to Health Threats | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
A multidisciplinary journal that focuses on public health and technology, public health informatics, mass media campaigns, surveillance, and innovation in public health practice and research. Also dedicated to rapid open data sharing during epidemics.

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The evolving role of pharma on social media

The evolving role of pharma on social media | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it

Pharma companies are increasingly active on Twitter around medical meetings, but risk crowding out other conversations from independent medical experts with the ‘noise’ of industry tweets. In an Expert View piece, Annie Sullivan, director of corporate social media at Anglo-Swedish pharma major AstraZeneca (LSE: AZN), discusses the company’s novel approach of being 'a better social media citizen' and how its adoption of this strategy at the ASCO Annual Meeting in 2017 may help evolve the role of pharma on social media.

Social media, particularly Twitter, comes alive at medical meetings. Discussions online mirror the huddled conversations in the hallways of exhibition centers between researchers, patients, doctors and pharmaceutical companies. It’s a valuable resource for followers around the world who can't attend, or for those in the conference center to make connections that may not otherwise happen.

Responding to feedback

In 2016, we heard feedback from ASCO attendees that the 'signal' to 'noise' ratio was off. Interesting information and insights were being lost in the 'noise' of extraneous information shared on social media, particularly content put out by the pharmaceutical industry. Those following the conference online feared that if leading physicians were struggling to find useful viewpoints on social media, they would start to go elsewhere and the whole community would lose out.

As a company with a large online following, AstraZeneca decided that we had a responsibility to respond to this feedback. We realized we had to change the way we socialized with others online.

So, we set out social media commitments for ourselves at the ASCO 2017 Annual Meeting to ensure we were being 'better social media citizens.'

That means recognizing that we are part of the wider social media ecosystem and ensuring that we contribute value to the conversation rather than just 'make noise' via conference hashtags. That also means our content must reflect our commitment to follow the science and our responsibility to the scientific community and cancer patients around the world.

We decided to tweet less and listen more. We focused on quality content and significantly reduced the number of tweets we put out over the ASCO meeting. We participated in the online conversation organically, by retweeting and highlighting valuable contributions to help elevate some of the ‘quieter’ voices at the conference, that we wanted a broader audience to hear.

Just 13 original tweets 

We did not engage in any paid promotion, a major cause of criticism in previous years. When we did post original content, we focused on what we do best - making our science accessible to others.

We knew from the start that this approach could reduce our digital footprint overall, but our focus was on value over volume. We sent out just 13 original tweets from @AstraZeneca and yet we still had a significant presence on social media. We ranked as one of only two companies in the top 10 #ASCO2017 influencer list on Symplur. By engaging with tweets from influencers and attendees, we expanded their potential audience by an average of 800%.

The community took notice and was very supportive of our new approach, encouraging us to continue. A Twitter poll from an ASCO Featured Voice showed that the majority of survey participants felt that there was less noise on Twitter during ASCO 2017 versus 2016 and several individuals attributed part of this shift to AstraZeneca’s efforts.

The whole pharmaceutical industry needs to reflect on how its activity on Twitter affects the broader community online, and evaluate whether its approach is actually serving the intended audience. This means considering what the pharmaceutical industry's role online can be – not only at conferences, but throughout the year.

The bottom line

It’s no longer enough to simply push out corporate content and share #DYKs (did you knows). The oncology ‘Twitterati’ have become very sophisticated and are expecting – in fact, they demand – considered scientific thought, insight and analysis.

Understanding how the communities we serve use social media – whether it’s to discuss science or share stories – is critical to ensuring industry contributions on social media remain valuable. A one-size-fits-all approach will not advance the industry beyond where it is now. It is only by listening that we can remain relevant within the social media ecosystem and become better social media citizens.


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Parkinson's app goes global

Parkinson's app goes global | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
Parkinson's is a neurological disorder that affects as many as 10 million people around the world. It is a condition that results from a shortage of dopamine in the brain, a chemical that helps instructions cross from one nerve cell to the next, thereby enabling a person's ability to control their movement. While its severity can vary from person to person, its symptoms can now be generally well controlled with medication. In addition to these drugs, there are now also new non-intrusive approaches that are helping those with the condition to lead more independent and fulfilling lives.
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How Does Patient Health Literacy Affect Digital Health Use?

How Does Patient Health Literacy Affect Digital Health Use? | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
New research shows that patients with lower health literacy are less likely to use different forms of digital health tools than those with high health literacy.Patients with high health literacy are more likely to use digital health tools than those with lower health literacy, finds a new study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.The study of nearly 5,000 adult patients first tested patient health literacy using the Newest Vital Sign measure for health literacy. Patients then answered questions regarding their relationship with digital health, including whether or not they had used fitness and nutrition apps, activity trackers, or patient portals.
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The Race For AI: Google, Twitter, Intel, Apple In A Rush To Grab Artificial Intelligence Startups

The Race For AI: Google, Twitter, Intel, Apple In A Rush To Grab Artificial Intelligence Startups | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
Nearly half of the AI companies acquired since 2011 have had VC backing.

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Philips: Big Data en la salud

Philips: Big Data en la salud | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
Este paradigma no es un mero brindis al sol. Es una realidad con nombres y apellidos: big data. Ingentes volúmenes de información capaces de registrar nuestra salud al minuto no solo para saber cómo estamos hoy sino para predecir la hoja de ruta que nos hará estar mejor mañana. Oportunidades de gestión sanitaria que pueden salvar cientos de millones de euros a los gobiernos. Las aplicaciones del big data en la salud tienden al infinito e invitan a imaginar un nuevo paradigma para el sector con esta tecnología como fulcro.

“Hay una explosión de datos en la salud. Y todo este caudal sobrepasa a las instituciones y profesionales del sector. Pero al mismo tiempo hay la promesa de que esta información tiene el potencial de mejorar la atención médica”, afirmaba Frans Van Houten, CEO de Philips, durante una entrevista entrevista concedida a The Wall Street Journal en el marco del Foro Económico Mundial de Davos. Una promesa que tiene cifras. Por ejemplo, los 265.000 millones de euros que se podría ahorrar el sistema de salud norteamericano implantando correctamente esta tecnología , según la consultora McKinsey. O los 25.000 petabytes de información que se manejarán en el sector en 2020, un incremento del 5000% en los últimos ocho años, según un estudio de IBM.

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La educación a través de Apps en enfermedades crónicas respiratorias

Esta semana hemos tenido el privilegio de contar en nuestro videoblog con Javier Palicio, presidente de FENAER ( Federación Nacional de Asociaciones d

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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, June 8, 2016 9:36 AM
Las aplicaciones móviles tienen mucho que decir en el ámbito del autocuidado y en ese sentido están surgiendo proyectos muy interesantes
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9 Políticas a desarrollar cuanto antes en Salud Digital

9 Políticas a desarrollar cuanto antes en Salud Digital | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
¿Qué queremos decir cuando decimos que no pasemos al 2.0 o 3.0 sin haber pasado adecuadamente por el 1.0?

Vamos a explicarlo, eso sí  en su parte tecnológica, la deontológica y sentimental la dejamos para otro día. No nos saltemos escalones, antes de posturear con lo 2.0 y sus secuelas convendría que la sanidad española iniciara de una vez una política adecuada de información y comunicación, que se debería ir concretando en:

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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, May 24, 2016 6:08 AM
A falta de estrategia, una serie de iniciativas en Salud Digital que deberían desarrollarse cuanto antes si de verdad queremos aportar valor a través de estos nuevos espacios
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Digital Health 2016: Top 100 Influencers and Brands

Digital Health 2016: Top 100 Influencers and Brands | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
An exhaustive list of the top 100 Digital Health influencers and brands driving the most engagement in 2016, including quotes from the experts.
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Patient involvement could improve medicines R&D, according to industry

Patient involvement could improve medicines R&D, according to industry | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
A new study by EUPATI has revealed a belief among pharmaceutical industry personnel that greater involvement of patients and the public could improve medicines research and development (R&D). The study, which is one of the first of its kind and part of the wider European Patients’ Academy (EUPATI) project, was published today in the BMJ Open.

Patients have become increasingly involved in managing their own health over recent years. Although still an emerging area, patient involvement in medicines R&D – in which patients are actively involved in research projects and in research organisations – is most visible in public research environments (e.g. the UK’s National Institute for Health Research) and areas where existing treatment options are limited (e.g. rare diseases).

Researchers interviewed 21 pharmaceutical industry professionals, representing 11 companies, from the UK, Spain and Poland, with diverse professional roles including pan-European roles, about their attitudes regarding Public and Patient Involvement (PPI) in medicines R&D.

Most of the professionals had positive beliefs about PPI, and many were optimistic that greater involvement of patients and the public would contribute positively to the medicines R&D process. However, those in Spain and Poland expressed more uncertainty about the benefits and value of PPI than those in the UK or with pan-European roles.

The interviewees also highlighted potential barriers to further PPI activity within the sector, including a sense that the concept was too intangible at the moment to persuade industry leaders of its importance and benefits; that organisational codes of practice currently represent obstacles to PPI; and that it may be difficult to engage public and patients if they have negative views of the sector.

As a result of the study, the EUPATI project is discussing the potential for a new direction towards PPI in industry-led medicines R&D and has identified examples of patient/industry partnerships in this area.


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rob halkes's curator insight, January 19, 2016 8:08 AM

Patients like no other can give directions to unmet needs and wishes in medicine research. their experiences might even give new direction in new developments in drug research and design.

However as indicated elsewhere: collaborating with other stakeholders goes further than just seeing them as marketing targets.

See this blog by Andrew Spong. See here

In a different perspective, it must be said that the relationships between patient advocacy Groups and the pharma industry is not an easy one too. See PatientView

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Un nuevo reto para la gestión sanitaria: escuchar

Un nuevo reto para la gestión sanitaria: escuchar | Salud y Social Media | Scoop.it
¿Imaginas un directivo sanitario escuchando las aportaciones del camarero de la cafetería del hospital? ¿y un gerente que tiene en cuenta como se traducen las estrategias en un equipo de salud del ámbito rural?
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