SA Human Geography H Class
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Scooped by Cole S
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Nepal profile

Nepal profile | SA Human Geography H Class | Scoop.it
Cole S's insight:

In the past Nepal was very isolated from the outside world both in news and also because of the geography of Nepal.  In a lot of the country there are no roads so it is very hard for people to connect physically, and untill recently they could not contact eachother electronically either.  According to the article there were 2.7 million internet users by June 2012, and there is even more noe.  This shows that the country is starting to develope which is a good sign.  Also, using the internet will help people connect easier and they can just log on and send an e-mail, instead of walking four days to the other villages.  The country of Nepal is starting to progress technalogically and will continue to do so as the country continues to bring in money.

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Girl Rising - Film Tells Story of Suma's Escape from Child Slavery Thanks to Nepal Youth Foundation

Girl Rising - Film Tells Story of Suma's Escape from Child Slavery Thanks to Nepal Youth Foundation | SA Human Geography H Class | Scoop.it
Sausalito, CA (PRWEB) October 10, 2013 -- All over the world, people will gather on International Day of the Girl (October 11) to watch the film Girl Rising — which features the story of Suma, a girl who was freed from child slavery by the Nepal Youth Foundation.
Mary J's insight:

This article briefly describes the life of Suma, a Nepalese girl who was sold at a very young age as a slave, and how she continues to inspire girls around the world.  She is featured in the film Girl Rising, which tells her traumatic, yet relatable story.  Girl Rising is a film that raises awareness of the importance of girls’ education, and it also empowers girls all over the world to accomplish their dreams and reach their full potential.  This film was played a few weeks ago at our school, sponsored by the Club Girl Up.  This article is a short summary of Suma's life explained in the film, as well as her experiences after the film. 

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Rescooped by Caroline from NEPAL: Disadvantaged children missing out on education
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NEPAL: Chepang struggle to educate their children

NEPAL: Chepang struggle to educate their children | SA Human Geography H Class | Scoop.it
The Chepang, one of Nepal’s most disadvantaged and marginalized indigenous groups, are struggling to educate their children. While many parents are managing to keep them in school, they worry that poverty will put an end to education.
Caroline's insight:

During the time of the civil war in Nepal, in the poor area of Humla, the parents of the little princes children, would sell everything they owned in order for their kids to avoid joining the maoist rebel army and so their children could go with Gollka. Gollka had promised their children an education and shelter, but it turned out it was a scam and he was a childtrafficer. The famlies of the little princes children became even more poor in result of selling everything, and in the future would encounter the conflict trying to give their other children the same chance of an education. This article explains that many famlies in Nepal, of the Chepang indigenous group, try to sell everything they have to give their children a chance of education, just like the parents of the little princes children. These families are so poor though, that they cannot aford to do that and their children are unable to get an education. NGO's try to help these types of families by colaborating with them and helping their children get an education, but because there is such a poor population in Nepal it is hard for the NGO's to help everyone. According to the article, Nepal has the lowest literacy rate and it will just keep on getting lower if the kids in Nepal do not get educated. The families in the article and the families from little princes both have a conflict of poverty to face to give their children the education they need.

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Caroline's curator insight, January 20, 2014 5:49 PM

During the time of the civil war in Nepal, in the poor area of Humla, the parents of the little princes children, would sell everything they owned in order for their kids to avoid joining the maoist rebel army and so their children could go with Gollka. Gollka had promised their children an education and shelter, but it turned out it was a scam and he was a childtrafficer. The famlies of the little princes children became even more poor in result of selling everything, and in the future would encounter the conflict trying to give their other children the same chance of an education. This article explains that many famlies in Nepal, of the Chepang indigenous group, try to sell everything they have to give their children a chance of education, just like the parents of the little princes children. These families are so poor though, that they cannot aford to do that and their children are unable to get an education. NGO's try to help these types of families by colaborating with them and helping their children get an education, but because there is such a poor population in Nepal it is hard for the NGO's to help everyone. According to the article, Nepal has the lowest literacy rate and it will just keep on getting lower if the kids in Nepal do not get educated. The families in the article and the families from little princes both have a conflict of poverty to face to give their children the education they need.

John Matthews's curator insight, May 22, 2014 3:08 PM

Providing access to school for marginalised and excluded children is just the start, thereafter they must be supported to stay in school, support provided to young girls who are so often pressurised to leave early and are abused, and to the quality of education. The answer is not more NGO "private english medium" schools. This creates a two tier system and the excluded remain excluded. NGO and government agencies must work together, government being less self serving and NGOs more transparent and proactive.

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Nepal profile - Timeline

Nepal profile - Timeline | SA Human Geography H Class | Scoop.it
Ian D's insight:

In this article it gives a timeline of Nepal and how it's government and people have advanced from 1768 to current day. In the timeline ,under 2001, the death of King Birendra, Queen Aishwarya, and other close relatives is a key event in the history of Nepal. We have discussed this topic in class and continue to discuss the Nepali government using the information given to us, using Connor Grennan's book. 

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GarrettS's comment, January 17, 2014 12:48 PM
I didn't realize that monarchy still existed in the early 2000's
Cole S's comment, February 4, 2014 9:00 AM
Great job finding a good article to post. This shows the entire history of Nepal which is great. It gave me a great perspective about how the country went from being extremely poor to bringing in more money. This gave great insight about how any country can develop and become a modern place instead of a war filled place. Great job.
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Khanal or Oli: Voting starts in UML to elect PP leader

Khanal or Oli: Voting starts in UML to elect PP leader | SA Human Geography H Class | Scoop.it
News from Nepal as it happens. Check for the latest on Nepali politics, business, society and sports.
Cole S's insight:

There has been voting in CPN-UML's Parliamentary Party.  They are deciding wheather Chairperson Jhalanath Khanal will be elected to the covested post of the PP leader.  This article shows me that although Nepal's government was off track before, they are starting to find their way back.  They are starting to get involved in the oil situations and trying to make the country more money.  If the contry has more money they can help people that are poor live better lives.

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Scooped by Emily W
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Plan's child trafficking project in Nepal

Plan's child trafficking project in Nepal | SA Human Geography H Class | Scoop.it
Founded more than 70 years ago, Plan is one of the oldest and largest international development agencies in the world working to ensure a better future for communities and its children. Make a donation or sponsor a child today.
Emily W's insight:

Plan is an organization in the US that works to help children have better lives. This certain project is helping trafficked girls around Nepal. Through donations they are able to rescue and rehabilitate trafficked girls among many other things. This would be one way that we could help the children in Nepal.

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Mary J's comment, February 3, 2014 11:13 PM
It's unfortunate to think about how many girls are victim to this human trafficking. "200,000 Nepalese girls are believed to be victims of the "trade" across the border." It sounds as if this organization is really trying to make a difference in a small way that will impact millions of lives for generations. It says at the ending of the article that it will take two years for the project to be completed. It would be interesting to keep up with the progress of this organization and see in two years if they have completed all of the goals they have set out to accomplish.
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The trafficked, abandoned and displaced children of Nepal — The International

The trafficked, abandoned and displaced children of Nepal — The International | SA Human Geography H Class | Scoop.it
Amalea G's insight:

 The Umbrella Foundation was founded after three people found out that the owner of an orphanage in Nepal was taking the money doanted to the orphanage and using it for himself.Those people notified the authorities and started the Umbrella Foundation in 2005. This article describes that it is not easy to reunite the orphans with their families once they are in different regions of Nepal. They have reunited about 200 families, but still have many more to go. As we have read in The Little Princes, the reunion between families is a very emotion process for both the parents and the children. 

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Ian D's comment, January 13, 2014 7:55 PM
This article is very helpful and helped with my confusion of the Umbrella Foundation's cause. You did a nice job relating it to the book.
GarrettS's comment, January 17, 2014 11:39 AM
I thought that this article was very interesting and helped show how desperate the situation in Nepal is. I didn't realize how expensive it was to run a children's home. "The monthly income of The Umbrella Foundation is around 26,000 Euros while their expenditures reach close to 32,000 Euros. A majority of this goes towards food and living expenses of the children in the homes. "
Caroline's comment, January 26, 2014 9:14 PM
This article was filled with a lot of facts I did not know about the Umbrella foundation and the trafficking of children in Nepal. I was espeacially stunned to discover that the "Trafficking is an ongoing problem in Nepal, involving the buying and selling of around 1.6 million children between the ages of 5 and 17, according to the 2011 National Child Labour Report." After reading little princes I had been under the impression that most of the trafficking of children had stopped, but it was just a matter of rescuing the children and finding their parents. At the end of the article it says that the Umbrella Foundation is not making as much money as it would like, and needs to keep on helping the kids, so I wonder what we can do to help them raise money.
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Maghe Sankranti - We All Nepali

Maghe Sankranti - We All Nepali | SA Human Geography H Class | Scoop.it
Maghe Sankranti is the first day of month of Magh in Bikram Sambat Calendar. Magh is tenth month in the year. Makar Sankranti is the festival of Sun God. Sun God is the symbol power, divinity and wisdom.
Ian D's insight:

This article describes one of the biggest festivals in Nepal, Maghe Sankranti. This festival is also know as Maghi. Throughout the article it describes the many events of the festival that take place and give us a more in depth of look at this Nepalese holiday. This article also relates to the book Little Princes, because Connor experience this holiday while he is in Nepal.

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