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Curated by Ms. Cerniglia
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▶ Working abroad can be dangerous, even deadly, for Nepali workers - YouTube

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Ciara D's curator insight, January 22, 2014 8:49 PM

This video shows the daily struggle Nepalese people face regarding their current economic situation. In Nepal, more and more people everyday travel out of the country to places like Saudi Arabia to work and collect money to send back to their families. This sounds nice, right? People going out of their ways to help their family live more comfortably with the money they will make? Wrong. The Dangers of doing this can result in murders, and horrible (sometimes fatal) injuries. This video explores the dangers of doing this, and explains the restrictions and laws that were placed to prevent further injuries and deaths. 

 

To Mrs. Cerniglia’s Human Geography class this isn’t the first time we have been exposed to a topic like this. Going back to our last book, "Enrique's Journey", similar actions are seen. Enrique's Journey educates its readers about the citizens of the Central and South American countries traveling illegally to the United States in search of a new life, work, and most importantly money they can send back to their families in their home countries. This video shows that situations such as these are seen all over the globe, where else will we see this next?

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Nepal’s Election May Not Lift Country’s Permanent Sense of Crisis | TIME.com

Nepal’s Election May Not Lift Country’s Permanent Sense of Crisis | TIME.com | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
For the second time in five years, Nepal goes to the polls to vote for a new government that many hope will end the political stalemate that has kept the former Himalayan kingdom in gridlock since 2008.
Ryan G's insight:

Nepal’s Election Many Not Lift Country’s Permanent Sense of Crisis

 

This article describes the crisis that is still going on in Nepal with their elections. The article starts with the fact that, “For the second time in five years, Nepal goes to the polls to vote for a new government that many hope will end the political stalemate… in gridlock since 2008.” This article relates to the book Little Princes because Conor mentions that even in 2006, when he was writing the book, the Royal Government had political tensions with the polls. This article shows the potential for more conflict within Nepal because of the fact that the Maoist think that this new constitution contains fraud. If the Maoists were to prove this right, then conflict would erupt between the two sides again. 

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Ryan G's curator insight, January 18, 2014 9:32 PM

Nepal’s Election Many Not Lift Country’s Permanent Sense of Crisis

 

This article describes the crisis that is still going on in Nepal with their elections. The article starts with the fact that, “For the second time in five years, Nepal goes to the polls to vote for a new government that many hope will end the political stalemate… in gridlock since 2008.” This article relates to the book Little Princes because Conor mentions that even in 2006, when he was writing the book, the Royal Government had political tensions with the polls. This article shows the potential for more conflict within Nepal because of the fact that the Maoist think that this new constitution contains fraud. If the Maoists were to prove this right, then conflict would erupt between the two sides again. 

Ryan G's curator insight, January 21, 2014 3:10 PM

Nepal’s Election Many Not Lift Country’s Permanent Sense of Crisis

 

This article describes the crisis that is still going on in Nepal with their elections. The article starts with the fact that, “For the second time in five years, Nepal goes to the polls to vote for a new government that many hope will end the political stalemate… in gridlock since 2008.” This article relates to the book Little Princes because Conor mentions that even in 2006, when he was writing the book, the Royal Government had political tensions with the polls. This article shows the potential for more conflict within Nepal because of the fact that the Maoist think that this new constitution contains fraud. If the Maoists were to prove this right, then conflict would erupt between the two sides again. 

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Amid Nepal's chaos, royalists spy chance for a comeback

Amid Nepal's chaos, royalists spy chance for a comeback | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
KATHMANDU (Reuters) - Just a few years ago, Nepal's royal family looked consigned to the history books.
Katie M's insight:

The monarchy in Nepal ended years ago, but they are looking to come back into power. Nepal is in the process of becoming a new country. The monarchy only held six percent of the popular vote in Nepal, but this is up one percent from the previous election. Nepal still has no solid form of government. People in Nepal want a Hindu country that has freedom of religion. It is interesting that people want freedom of religion, but they wanted to insure that Hinduism is the main religion.

 

Another interesting point is that Maoist leaders don't think that success will last for long. Usually, opposing parties would be quickly to agree, but Nepal does need stabilization.

 

The monarchy is not known for its stabilization, but it was the longest form of government in Nepal. People in Nepal want a new form of government, but they have been living in an unstable government for over a decade. After all this waiting it is possible that people in Nepal might settle just to get back to normal. All the conflict caused by the Maoists and the Royal Monarchy, which later caused collaboration between the two parties. People willing to settle is dangerous because Nepal might slip back into the past causing all the hard work to create a democratic country may have been a waste. This could also cause great conflict for Conor because more chaos means more children slipping through the system. 

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TessaJ's comment, January 23, 2014 5:26 PM
I thought it was very interesting to think of a second uprising against a government in Nepal. The article stated that there has been no word from former King Gyanendra to bring back the royal monarchy. Do you think he just doesn't want to put effort into trying to get back in power or does he not want to rule over Nepal anymore? He did have a hard time ruling Nepal until 2006 with many Maoist bandhas and protests. Does the royalist party pose a threat to another change in government in Nepal? Personally, I think not seeing as there is a small percentage of people who want to bring the monarchy back, and so many people were eager to abolish the monarchy in 2006.
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Building the Sukaura WireBridge - YouTube

A new WireBridge is built in January 2009 by EcoSystems and villagers to allow safe access across Nepal's Netrawati river to the Achane school. More than 3 m...
julia N.'s insight:

This Scoop is from Ms. Cerniglia.  It is a video about how children in Nepal get to school from their houses.  They have to travel miles on unsafe bridges and zip lines.  Pay attention to the fact that the moms are making this trek with their babies on their backs.  

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Christopher G's comment, January 23, 2014 12:28 AM
WOW. This is amazing. I think this really shows how much the children and villagers value education. They are wiling to make this long trek day after day just to go to school! They work so hard to keep improvement of transportation. I also realized how difficult transportation is up in the mountains and deep in the villages. All this work is needed just to cross a river. These villages and people are very scarce on resources and it shocks me how they can survive in such harsh conditions. I think I have it bad when it’s too cold to walk across the street during a cold day to ride on a bus that effortlessly takes me all he way to school. These people have to do so much more than I do just to get to school and learn. Like I said, this really shows how high the value of education really is. I also like the idea of helping these villagers out to help them fulfill their everyday tasks and obstacles. I think it would be great if we as a school could set up something to work with them and volunteer time to help the villagers. This would help give us a better understanding of Connor’s struggles that he had when going through the mountains to educate the villagers.
Ms. Cerniglia's comment, February 5, 2014 7:39 AM
I like that idea, too, Chris!
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News Analysis: Settlement of war-era cases an uphill task for Nepal's political parties - Xinhua | English.news.cn

News Analysis: Settlement of war-era cases an uphill task for Nepal's political parties - Xinhua | English.news.cn | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
The court also said that both commissions should be patterned after they accepted international standards and that there should be no provision for clemency on cases related to grave human rights violations such as disappearances and rapes...
EmmyA's insight:

This article talks about the settlement of war-era cases by Nepal's political parties. Nepal's Supreme Court wanted the government to have seperate commissions for the inquiry on truth and reconciliation and another for disappearances. They wanted the government to create a plan to settle these, but the parties are already in a disagreement from other problems. Before, when the parties made a single bill for both issues, they also created a provisionof amnesty because some leaders feared they would have to go to court because a lot of the human rights violations were commited based on political decrees.Both the Maoist and state agencies are guilty of committing human rights violations. The court continues to push for theseissues to be settled, stating that when the government was Maoist-led, they failed to recognize the disapearences as crimes. Many of the political parties agreed to resolve these issues, but still nothing has been solved yet. A human rightsassociation has then asked the government yet again to solve these war-era issues.
This relates to the Little Princes because when Conor was in Nepal, it was hard to get the government to recognize the
problems with the disappearances of the seven children he was trying to find. It also takes them a very long time to get
something done. For example, Conor decided to find the village where a missing child could be by himself. He ended up finding
one of the missing children, Amita. He did this because it could've been too late if he waited for an agency in Nepal to find her.
This also relates to cooperation and conflict because the political parties in Nepal will need to cooperate to solve these cases. If not, conflict will occur between the political parties and/or between the supreme court and political parties because they have yet to solve these ongoing problems. It would also affect the people of Nepal, especially the ones who were the victims of the cases, because the government was too slow and unsuccessful to solve these issues.

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Nepal's Government Promises To Banish Kamlari Indentured Servant Practice

Nepal's Government Promises To Banish Kamlari Indentured Servant Practice | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
After mass protests by Nepal’s kamlari, or indentured female servants, the government has agreed to take steps to abolish the practice.
TessaJ's insight:

This article explains the practice of Kamlari, in which families in the ethnic group, Tharus, sell their daughters to another family to do forced labor. Once sold over to a family, girls are often forced to work all day, are not fed enough, and are beaten. The article also talks about efforts to help kamlaris. The Nepal Youth Foundation works to free girls sold to do forced labor, and many ex-kamlaris are involved in the fight to ban kamlaris in Nepal.

 

The practice of Kamlari is a form of child trafficking, a topic discussed in the Little Princes. There are some differences between the trafficking in the Little Princes, such as selling a daughter as a Kamlari is a cultural practice, where many of the parents in Little Prince didn't know that their child would be forced to work. Both forms of trafficking exploit children of poor families all the same.

 

This article discusses the conflict related to kamlaris including not only the exploitation of girls but the clash between girls fighting for their rights and the government in Nepal. It also talks about the cooperation between foundations, ex-kamlaris, and even people around the world working to stop the unjust practice of kamlari.

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Priya R's comment, January 20, 2014 2:51 PM
This article informed me of another corrupt practice in Nepal-- Kamlari. It is very sad and unfortunate that these girls are being treated so poorly. I always thought that workers were treated with respect. This article also helped me understand one part of the movie, Girl Rising, in which a Kamlari from Nepal is shown and how the Kamlaris attempt to protest, as written in the article. These girls have very traumatic, as well as inspiring, stories. It's inspiring to know that these girls, though their families have abandoned them, are fighting for their rights. They are very strong people.
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Human Trafficking in Nepal

Human Trafficking in Nepal | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
Nepal is mainly a source country for men, women, and children who are subjected to forced labor and sex trafficking. Nepali men are subjected to forced labor, most often in the Middle East and, to a lesser extent, within the country.
Priya R's insight:

This website is astonishing. I did not realize before reading about the "Human Trafficking in Nepal" section of it that men, women, and children are trafficked by people other than Golkka. These people are not trafficked because their parents are tricked-- they are trafficked for forced sex and/or labor. This dicusses how trafficking has increased throughout the years and is becoming a big problem. The Government of Nepal has tried to stop trafficking by developing policy initiatives, however many government officials are unable to put the policies to good use due to lack of evidence (as was seen in the book with Golkka). What surpised me even more is that the article reads "law enforcement authorities do not consider domestic forced prostitution of adults to be a trafficking issue." It is outrageous!

 

This relates to Little Princes because Little Princes was about child trafficking in which parents are fooled into thinking that their children are being smuggled into a safer place with education. This article introduces another aspect of smuggling in Nepal which opened my eyes to the brutality in the world even more.

 

This relates to cooperation and conflict. There is a conflict between the whole idea of trafficking vs. humanity, the trafficked, and the Government of Nepal. It relates to cooperation because the traffickers obviously have connections with corrupt officials, otherwise evidence would not be that hard to collect.

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Christopher G's comment, January 23, 2014 12:05 AM
This article really is interesting. I especially find interest in the part that you quoted. To me, I find it crazy how the government is having such a problem with stopping this HUGE trafficking problem. I'm not sure if the traffickers are really talented in hiding evidence or the Government has a problem. I couldn't imagine the US being like this. I would pose the question of what should Nepal's Government do to stop this problem; what should they try differently to stop or decrease these trafficking problems? I think they can try using undercover agents, like how we do in the US, to pose as poor families in villages, and maybe from there they can track down the traffickers and get a better idea to get evidence and find out how they operate. But, I think it’s a great and informative article, nice work!
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Nepal Education

Nepal Education | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
EmmyA's insight:

This article is about Nepal's education. In Nepal, they didn't have many good education opportunities for a while, due to the Rana regime not wanting to educate people. When schools did become more common, they were set in the city and many children from rural areas or villages did not get any education. Illiteracy rates in Nepal are about 58%, most of them being women. Nepal has learned that educating people is not something to stray away from but something to encourage. NGOs are also a big help to Nepal by supporting them to educate their children. In the book, Little Prince's by Conor Grennan, the children of Little Princes are getting an education unlike they would get at their original region, Humla. Conor also started out working with an NGO to help the children. When Conor found the seven children abducted by Golkka, he made it his job to get them a home and education. Education leads them towards having a more successful life, and that is what Nepal is trying to spread. 

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Katie M's comment, January 20, 2014 9:53 PM
It is a shame that education is not looked as highly, but it is even worse that girls are not being educated. While it is not surprising that girls are put behind boys in a developing country, it is still not right. Stereotypically girls are seen as the weaker links, so why should be the ones who work in the fields. If girls are known to over think things then why aren't they studying? At Dhaulagiri there were so few girls at the orphanage because their parents viewed that boys should be educated first. Even though the parents made a mistake by handing their child off to a child trafficker, they did the right thing by wanting a girl to be educated. Educating girls would help that illiteracy rate 58 percent decrease. The rate of girls having children at a young age would decrease. This would cause the poverty rate decrease because families would be able to stabilize themselves before their children came. Instead of being overwhelmed with the cost of a child at a young age.
Ciara D's comment, January 22, 2014 9:40 PM
I agree this article is very interesting, and I also think the issue being discussed is an important topic. It is mentioned that the NGO's are a definite contributor in helping children become educated. This, however, raises the question on how exactly does the Nepal government react to them? Because after all, the "Rana regime feared educated public so education was never encouraged there", and even though the Rana Regime era ended in 1950, their same ideas and beliefs must be still around somewhere. On the topic of girls education, I strongly disagree with the sexist discrimination against Nepalese girls being displayed, but because the NGO's are doing so much to contribute to the education in Nepal, are they also working on this too? Great article, Emmy!
Mia K's comment, January 24, 2014 12:04 AM
I really enjoyed this article, and the connection you made to Little Princes was very logical. One thing that I found fascinating in the article is that they say, “The Education System of Nepal is based on that of United States." I think it is good to know that we can be a model for other developing countries, such as Nepal. With most early civilizations it seems that males usually get more education and do more labored work, but I learned that this is not true in the case of Nepal. According to the article more females are literate than men, and we also learned from Little Princes by Conor Grennan that the women are the ones that work in the fields. This article does a great job of going more into detail about the things that we have learned about from Little Princes.
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Culture | Welcome Nepal

Culture | Welcome Nepal | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
julia N.'s insight:

The introduction and bottom two paragraphs about costumes and food are the focus point of this scoop.  The religion portion we discussed a lot in class so feel free to read it, but pay more attention to the intro and bottom two paragraphs. 

The customs paragraph gives light to marriages in Nepal.  In the book we read, Little Princes by Conor Grennan,  Conor talks about  arranged marriages and how it is so different from America.  The conversations he has with the children are evidence  when they talk about having seen American movies and how it’s different.  The paragraph also addresses the word “Jutho” which we discussed in class and Conor brought it up during meals.

The Food paragraph teaches us about many different cooking styles in Nepal.  Throughout the book we were used to having daal bhat for every meal, including Christmas morning (excluding special Nepalese occasions).  However, in this article I discovered that Nepal does not have a certain cooking style.  It depends on the region, which you are located.  Nepal’s food has been influenced by surrounding countries and this paragraph addresses that.  

The introduction paragraph for this culture article ties everything you’ve read together and builds an identity for Nepal.  The cooperation between different cultures builds the nations identity.  

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Matt R's comment, January 9, 2014 4:31 PM
I thought that your article was very informative and I found that part about how the food depends on the region especially interesting. While I was reading Little Princes, I thought that the food they ate was just Dal Bhat. I also found it interesting when it said that Buddists and Hindus coexisted even though Maoists were mostly buddists. but we did talk about in class how the two groups gave up their differences during holiday's, which I thought, with an american perspective, very interesting.
TessaJ's comment, January 12, 2014 12:42 PM
In the article, it talks about the custom of arranged marriage and the roles of women. I researched more about the topic and realized that Nepal is much more gender specific than I thought. Many girls marry at a young age because they want to have as many sons as possible. Therefore, the adolescent marriage and pregnancy rate for girls is very high. Religion plays a role in marriage because in Hinduism, the predominant religion of Nepal, parents arrange a marriage, which sometimes isn't made in regard to the relationship between the spouses.I also learned that just like the women in Humla, a lot of Nepalese women do most of the work around the house and in agricultural jobs.
Mia K's comment, January 24, 2014 12:12 AM
This article talked a lot about what we have already learned in class, but I enjoyed learning a little more into detail. I think it is funny that the god Lakshmi is the god of wealth and I will remember that. This article is very informative about the things that we learned in class and the things that we probably didn’t have time to learn in class. Although you said that you focused more on the customs and food section, I found the religion section to catch my attention more. I think the article does a great job of telling us a little bit of everything instead of too much of one thing.
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Prime story_Maoist rebels join Nepal Army_10 Bhadra 2070

In a major development, at least 70 former Maoist rebels joined the Nepal Army as officer-cadets after they completed nine months of basic training. The ex-r...
Ryan G's insight:

Officers of Nepal Army

 

This article has to do with former Maoist Rebels now becoming officers in the Nepalese army. This article can be related to the book, Little Princes, because of the fact that these 70 former Maoists were once part of the big anti-government movement that tried to stop the Nepalese Government in the civil war. Now, these 70 people were accepted into the army in order to protect the government. This shows collaboration because these former Maoists are now working with the government to put an end to the long dispute between the two sides, the government and the Maoists. 

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Ryan G's curator insight, January 18, 2014 9:17 PM

Officers of Nepal Army

 

This article has to do with former Maoist Rebels now becoming officers in the Nepalese army. This article can be related to the book, Little Princes, because of the fact that these 70 former Maoists were once part of the big anti-government movement that tried to stop the Nepalese Government in the civil war. Now, these 70 people were accepted into the army in order to protect the government. This shows collaboration because these former Maoists are now working with the government to put an end to the long dispute between the two sides, the government and the Maoists. 

Rescooped by Ryan G from Officers of Nepal Army
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ICAPP on human trafficking begins

ICAPP on human trafficking begins | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
News from Nepal as it happens. Check for the latest on Nepali politics, business, society and sports.
Ryan G's insight:

ICAPP on human exploitation begins

 

This article describes the importance of stopping child exploitation. This article is similar to the book, ­Little Princes, where Conor’s purpose in Nepal is to stop exploitation. Not only in Nepal is exploitation a big issue though. Other Asian countries are also having the problem of exploitation. Chairman of the Council of Ministers, Khiil Raj Regmi said, “trafficking in human beings in the present world was a big challenge to the human civilization and the civilized society itself.” Organizations like the ICAPP are one of the many other organizations trying to stop exploitation. In addition, the ICAPP is trying to “raise public awareness” on the issue, similar to Conor and how he raised awareness in America about the same issue. These Asian countries and the exploitation organizations are cooperating in order to stop exploiters from crossing the borders with the children. These organizations are “establishing a fast-track punishment system and issuing the Kathmandu-statement on human exploitation.”

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Ryan G's curator insight, January 18, 2014 9:24 PM

ICAPP on human exploitation begins

 

This article describes the importance of stopping child exploitation. This article is similar to the book, ­Little Princes, where Conor’s purpose in Nepal is to stop exploitation. Not only in Nepal is exploitation a big issue though. Other Asian countries are also having the problem of exploitation. Chairman of the Council of Ministers, Khiil Raj Regmi said, “trafficking in human beings in the present world was a big challenge to the human civilization and the civilized society itself.” Organizations like the ICAPP are one of the many other organizations trying to stop exploitation. In addition, the ICAPP is trying to “raise public awareness” on the issue, similar to Conor and how he raised awareness in America about the same issue. These Asian countries and the exploitation organizations are cooperating in order to stop exploiters from crossing the borders with the children. These organizations are “establishing a fast-track punishment system and issuing the Kathmandu-statement on human exploitation.”

 

Suggested by Ian J.
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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.
Ms. Cerniglia's insight:

From Ian J

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Mia K's comment, January 24, 2014 12:34 AM
I found this comic very moving. I was able to gain a lot of information from this story. I think that it is so interesting that they put this subject in a comic. I reminds me of the book we read in 8th grade, Maus. In some ways I think that this is a better way to get one’s message across. There is no need for words that do not actually contribute to one’s message when you can use pictures and captions to sum it up. There were many surprising statistics that I had never even thought were possible. Thank you for sharing this because I feel that I have been able to get a lot from it.
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Maoists to Join Nepal Assembly After Ensuring Election Inquiry

Maoists to Join Nepal Assembly After Ensuring Election Inquiry | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
The Maoists, who suffered a stinging defeat in November elections and filed claims of fraud, agreed to delay an inquiry they are seeking as the assembly is formed.
Matt R's insight:

This article explains how the Maoist party of Nepal feel that they have been cheated out of some votes in the Constituent Assembly elections in November.  This assembly is to be the writers of the new Constitution for Nepal. This is actually the second Constituent Assembly, the first one being in 2008 butthat one had failed but tehir are big hopes that this one will turn out differently.  I think that it is interesting how the Maoists are now being taken is a serious political party now and that they are conforming to public policy on this issue and that they haven't taken any violent actions.  It really shows how far they have come along.  the Maoists have not been apart of a national election to write a constitution for Nepal, they are also a respected political party.  This article also tells us that it was the Maoists peace accrod after the cqivil war that lead to the first Constituent Assembly.

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Nepal votes to elect new assembly, a second attempt to form constitution

Nepal votes to elect new assembly, a second attempt to form constitution | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
Nepalis went to the polls Tuesday amid tight security to elect an assembly that will draw up a new constitution.
Katie M's insight:

The dream of a new country in Nepal may be finally coming true. The election in Nepal has provided cooperation. On Election Day the anti-poll alliance attempted a transport strike to stop the elections. Their initiative failed because Nepalis came together to vote. Nepalis collectively decided to form a new country where violence like the anti-poll alliance created would not be allowed. The Maoists and the Neapali Congress have both tried to become the biggest party in Nepal. The Maoists have seemed to set aside the violence to ensure a fair election. In Little Princes the Maoists did not try to do something like this before. Their actions may cause true communism to form instead of the tyranny that currently holds possession of other communist countries.

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Swaggy_P's comment, January 16, 2014 11:38 AM
I am glad that you scooped this Katie, because in Little Princes it seemed that the Maoists were finished with these violent acts to gain power. However, it now appears that the country of Nepal is somewhat jeopardy to communism.
julia N.'s comment, January 23, 2014 12:01 AM
Katie, I too am glad you scooped this. I actually feel, in some ways, different than how Chris feels. Because of discussion in class I knew Golkka still had political power even though we knew he was bad, and even though the Maoist were starting to cooperate the itch for power and different desires got the best of them. It was interesting and sad to see the different strategies Maoist use to get what they want. I think it is important to continuously update ourself in the political strategies all around the world.
Scooped by Priya R
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Nepal: Maps, History, Geography, Government, Culture, Facts, Guide & Travel/Holidays/Cities | Infoplease.com

Information on Nepal — geography, history, politics, government, economy, population statistics, culture, religion, languages, largest cities, as well as a map and the national flag.
Priya R's insight:

This is a very short and sweet overview of Nepal's geography, government, and history. The geography section gives one a picture of a very mountainous terrain. The government section discusses the transition from monarchy to democracy (it also includes the pro-democracy protests in April 2006 which we had to look up for homework). The history seciton discusses Buddhism, Hinduism, and how Nepal was unified. It says that Siddharta Guatama was born in Kathmandu Valley! It includes Hinduism by noting how Hinduism influenced Nepal, not only because of its bordering country, India, but also because Buddhism stemmed off of Hinduism. 

 

This relates to Little Princes because the book took place in Nepal.

 

This article related to cooperation. In the geography section, the mountainous terrain described makes Nepal seem very hard to live in. However, throughout the book, I have learned that Nepalese people cooperate with the terrain and get used to it. They somehow manage, In the government section, cooperation is displayed because the Parliament cooperated with the people, who had a conflict with the monarchy in place, and voted to abolish the monarchy. The history section illustrates cooperation between Buddhists and Hindus because it depicts how both religions reside in Nepal.

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julia N.'s comment, January 22, 2014 11:50 PM
I agree, this article has been very short, sweet, and to the point. I found aspect of it to be not only educational but also very interesting. For example, the fact that Siddharta Guatama was born in Kathmandy Valley and Buddhism originated from. which I feel like I know so well because of Little Princes. You say in your second third paragraph of describing the website that Nepalese people cooperate with the terrain they live in. Do you think one could go as far to say that they thrive from the land they are living on? I understand what you are saying about how hard it must be to live there but they get a lot of income from tourism. Because Nepal is home to Mt. Everest that also draws tourism.
Mia K's comment, January 24, 2014 12:19 AM
This website has some great information. One thing that I saw on there that I didn’t expect was on the main page under history. They go back so far to the first signs of when there was civilization there and I think that is amazing that they are able to figure that out. I also think it is very good at giving us recent history. It isn’t live news, but tells us some main events that have occurred in the past few years. The Nepalese Civil War seems to have ended so long ago, but these addition update type of articles are able to let us know how the people in Nepal have tried and are trying to resolve their conflict.
Scooped by Priya R
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China Aims to Fully Mute Dalai Lama

China Aims to Fully Mute Dalai Lama | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
China aims to stamp out the voice of the Dalai Lama, the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, by making his words inaccessible to Tibetans by any means, a top official said.
Priya R's insight:

This article discusses China's somewhat futile attempts to shut out the Dalai Lama and end Tibetan Buddhism. The article says that  China blocked out information about the Dalai Lama by not showing information about him on TV or the radio and by blocking all information on him on the internet. China even made bringing in the Dalai Lama's teachings and/or his picture illegal! However, some Tibetan Buddhists smuggle in pictures or find news of him through illegal TV's. Tibet's party chief responded to this by writing, "the voice and image of the enemy forces and the Dalia clique are neither seen nor heard." Now, the government will confiscate anything which is a source of information about the Dalai Lama. In general, China is working very hard to completely prohibit and eliminate the Dalai Lama so that only one voice can be heard and be forced upon the people.

 

This article relates to Little Princes because Buddhist monks from the Tibetan Diaspora resided in the stupa across Conor's apartment. Also, we discussed the Dalai Lama and Buddhism during this unit a lot because it is common in the mountains of Nepal.

 

This article relates to cooperation and conflict. The obvious correlation is the conflict between China's governement and Tibetan Buddhists and the Dalai Lama because China believes that the Dalia Lama is taking control away from China. However, cooperation is also displayed because the Tibetan Buddhists are cooperating with the Dalai Lama. Without their cooperation with him, the Dalai Lama would mean nothing to anyone today. They are remaining faithful to their religon even with all the risks. 

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TessaJ's comment, January 12, 2014 2:09 PM
After reading this article, I learned about modern day Tibetan Buddhists in China, and the ways they manage to practice their religion without being caught. The communists in China not only prohibit Tibetan Buddhism, but also any other religion because according to the writings of Carl Marx, "religion is the opiate of the masses." In particular, Christians have been persecuted. Many religious gatherings were broken up and religious leaders have been imprisoned. Regardless of the risks, many people in China still practiced a religion. In a recent survey, about 85 percent of Chinese people said they were religious.
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Maoists to Join Nepal Assembly After Ensuring Election Inquiry

Maoists to Join Nepal Assembly After Ensuring Election Inquiry | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
The Maoists, who suffered a stinging defeat in November elections and filed claims of fraud, agreed to delay an inquiry they are seeking as the assembly is formed.
Matt R's insight:

This article is about the Maoist party in Nepal agreeing to help write the final chapters of Nepal's constitution even after supposed fraud of Maoist's not getting the votes that they anticipated into parliament.  The election moniters have dismissed this claim completely.

This just shows that even after the peace agreement was signed between the Maoist's and the royal government, their is still some conflict going on between the political parties.  Their is, however, cooperation between the Maoists and the other parties as they have agreed to drop the alleged fraud until after the Constituent assembly, where a parliamentary panel will investigate.

The Maoists are now a completely legitimate political party and they are trying to be a part of writing Nepal's constitution.  The first constituent assembly was formed after the 2008 elections, discussed in class, and was later dismissed in 2012.  This lead to the formation of the new constituent assembly which was voted on by the people and this event is what the Maoist's have accused of voting fraud to have occured.

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EmmyA's comment, January 9, 2014 8:02 PM
Your article talks about an ongoing problem in Nepal, and I agree with you when you say that there are still conflict between the government and the Maoists, although they try to make it look like there is not. After the election monitors dismissed the claim, it seems really suspicious that the Maoists are fairly voted in to making decisions for Nepal. However, if the Maoists cooperate with the royal government for the betterment of Nepal, it could be good. My question is are they planning to try to do something to overthrow the royal governments power again?
Ms. Cerniglia's comment, February 5, 2014 7:26 AM
The royal government is no longer in power and the various political parties are currently working to write a new constitution.
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Nepal struggles to contain human trafficking problem

Nepal struggles to contain human trafficking problem | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
As trafficking laws go unenforced, Nepalese women and children are being coerced into the sex and construction industries. Rachel Williams reports
Swaggy_P's insight:

          This article follows the story of a young woman from Nepal, Raji, and how she was trafficled by smugglers to India where she was forced to work for a construction business.  Raji, who was 16 at the time, was looking for work and was promised 180 rupees a day, as well good clothes, and meat to eat everyday.  In reality, Raji was paid 100 rupees once, and was feed two meals a day that consisted of rice and broth which contained a few potatoes.  

          In addition, many of the trafficked women end up in brothels, are raped, and are even forced into domestic servitude.  Raji's friend, Kamashi, was raped by another worker and on returning to Nepal found out that she was one month pregnant. 

          Experts believe that many people are tricked into these situations because they are searching for jobs.  There has been a lack of employment in Nepal which has been caused by the political instability since the end of the civil war in Nepal that we learned about in Little Princes, written by Conor Grennan.

 

 

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Christopher G's comment, January 23, 2014 12:14 AM
Hey Chris. This is a great article and I think it is an intriguing story as well. This article is somewhat similar to one of Priya’s posts. Its similar in the way that Nepal is struggling to stop this human trafficking epidemic. To me, it is crazy to believe that so many people are being trafficked and the traffickers aren’t even being caught! How does the government, who is supposed to be in charge, let this problem walk right in front of them and they cant even do something about. Like in Priya’s, I proposed the question what would you suggest the government in Nepal to do to help reduce this trafficking problem? My first suggestion was the use of secret agents to place in the villages to gather more detail and evidence to help bring own the traffickers. I cannot think of some other ways to help stop it, but I think it would be a valid question to ask. But, great work on the post. I liked the article.
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Video Games that Foster Global Empathy: Real Lives and Quandary

Video Games that Foster Global Empathy: Real Lives and Quandary | SA Human Geography D Class | Scoop.it
Can certain video games teach kids social-emotional learning skills?

 

Now more than ever, the value of empathy is being recognized in our efforts to understand others across cultural and geographical divides. On this blog, we’ve covered the role of empathy in schools, parenting, society, and business. But this benevolent trend has now manifested itself even in the world of video games.

Real Lives is a simulation game developed by Bob Runyan and Ashoka FellowParag Mankeekar that allows players to inhabit the lives of individuals around the world. This game enables us to perceive the world through the eyes of another person within a context that is considerably different from our own and to undergo experiences that this individual is likely to have within his or her social setting, based on statistically accurate realities and events.

 

By Rukmini Banerjee


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Ms. Cerniglia's curator insight, January 6, 2014 4:44 PM

Fascintating way to use gaming to develop empathy.