Ryan's Midsummer Nights Dream Page
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Image

Image | Ryan's Midsummer Nights Dream Page | Scoop.it
rkracine@cox.net's insight:

I believe this picture really shows the major theme of the play, the mixed up love triangle. On the ground of this picture we have the mortals who are fighting for each other’s love and in the air there are cupids shooting love arrows at them. The people on the ground would represent the mortal characters in the play and Titania. The cupids in the air represent Puck and Oberon. Puck and Oberon are making people fall in love with their love juice and throughout the play the other characters are fighting for someone's love, like the people on the ground. This picture really gives a good image of what a big mess the love part of the play is.

 

 Sanzio, Raphael. TheTriumph of Galatea 1512. (s) italian-renaissance-art.com. 3 Mar 2013 <http://www.italian-renaissance-art.com/image-files/galatea-raphael.jpg>;

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Source Article

Source Article | Ryan's Midsummer Nights Dream Page | Scoop.it
Essential information on Shakespeare's sources, from Shakespeare Online.
rkracine@cox.net's insight:

Shakespeare referenced The Canterbury Tales and the Knight's Tale by using the characters Theasus and Hippolyita. In these referanced tales there is the "noble duc to Athenes" whose name is Theseus. In a Midsummers night dream the duke of Athens is Theseus. These names and the person who has them are basically the same. Also The Canterbury Tales and the Knight's Tale have a character named Ypolita, who is queen of the amazons and set to be wedded to Theseus. In a Midsummer Night's Dream the queen of the amazons who is set to be married to Theseus is Hippolyta which sounds a lot like Ypolita.

 

Mabillard, Amanda. Shakespeare's Sources for A Midsummer Night's Dream. Shakespeare Online. 3 Mar. 2013. < http://www.shakespeare-online.com/sources/mssources.html >.

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Historical Article

Historical Article | Ryan's Midsummer Nights Dream Page | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
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This article explains the process of Shakespeare’s writing. It explains how many people think that Shakespeare didn't really write his plays. It then goes on to prove this. It explains that Shakespeare did have apprentices and coworkers that helped him with his play but he was considered the owner of the play. The fact that he didn't write his plays alone though does give us a new lens to look through. Because he didn't write his plays alone, the different parts of a play were written by different people. This could account for the different style characters in his plays. One example is in Romeo and Juliet; there are the nobles and then there are the common folk. Also in A midsummer night's dream there are three different sets of characters, the nobles, the tradesmen, and the fairies. With this new lens we can see how these drastically different sets of characters might be all in the same play cause the play had more than one writer.

 

Berry, Ralph. "Anonymous Shakespeare?." Contemporary Review 293.1703 (2011): 488-492. Literary Reference Center. Web. 14 Feb. 2013.

http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=23f45384-a847-4f4e-889f-b03305a31a07%40sessionmgr14&vid=3&hid=18&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=lfh&AN=70640423

 

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Abby Boisvert's comment, March 9, 2013 12:39 PM
Do you think that Shakespeare copyrighted? Or did he just borrow?
rkracine@cox.net's comment, March 10, 2013 9:29 PM
I think he copied many plays but had some unique ones.
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Video Clip

Part 5 The Cork Shakespearean Company presents A Midsummer Night's Dream. Preformed in the Cork Arts Theatre on May, 2011.
rkracine@cox.net's insight:

This act shows Puck turning  Bottom into a donkey for his amusement and Oberon's. This isn't really needed seeingg Oberon asked for Titania to fall in love with an animal. There are plenty of animals in the woods and puck didn't really have to make a new one but he did it because he found it funny. This action definately has an affect on Bottom. He is somewhat abducted by Titania after this and this shows how Fairies have a big inpact on the lives of mortals.

 

The Cork Shakespearean Company. A Midsummer night's Dream. Cork Arts Theatre. May 2011. 3 Mar 2013 <http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=ofXApJsUnSM#t=330s>;

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Literary Critisism

Literary Critisism | Ryan's Midsummer Nights Dream Page | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
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Lina Perkins Wilder’s main argument in her article: Changeling Bottom  is that Bottom is a character who has multiple personalities and changes between them regularly throughout the play. This is a valid point and it really represents the three groups of characters in the play. These three personalities are Bottom, Pyramus and Clown.  The author explains the difference between these personalities by explaining when bottom is each of these. As she says “Bottom’s three names outline a tension between professional/trade, professional/theatrical, and class roles.” The author explains that the name Pyramus is given to him “in the immediate context of the play-within-the-play.” This is a solid connection that during these situations the character called Bottom is using the Pyramus personality. The comedic/clown personality comes out really only when he is with his fellow tradesmen. The author uses this to connect the clown personality with Bottom’s professional/trade part. Bottom’s last name is his normal name; Bottom. This name represents his social class in the play. In the play, the fairies are the top social class, then the nobility of Athens, and lastly the tradesmen. The author uses this as the reason that Bottom is called Bottom. This represents that he and his friends are at the bottom of the play’s social ladder and therefore Bottom’s real name shows his “class role”. The author includes another main argument in her article. She says that “What [she] wishes to argue here is not only that Bottom’s ‘identity’ is multiple, but that the qualities to which Barton alludes (generosity, inclusiveness, and imagination) are not properties of the play itself but of Bottom’s negotiation among his and others’ many names.” The author is saying that the qualities of the character change with the names. So if bottom changed to clown he would be more funny, light-hearted, and happy than if he were in his Pyramus personality. The Pyramus personality would also have different qualities. The author did not support her second argument enough. Her first argument was clear and had lots of support but her second argument is not connected to the text at all. She says “Changefulness is above all an actorly quality”. This somewhat disproves her point because if changefulness is an “actorly” quality than bottom would only really change when he is his Pyramus personality but, we see a change in Bottom when he wakes up in the morning and at that point he is not in his Pyramus personality but probably more in his Clown personality and maybe even his Bottom personality. This makes the authors second point much more unclear. But other than that the authors points are very valid and supported with much evidence.

 

Wilder, Lina Perkins. "Changeling Bottom: Speech Prefixes, Acting, And Character In A Midsummer Night's Dream." Shakespeare (1745-0918) 4.1 (2008): 45-64. Literary Reference Center. Web. 3 Mar. 2013.

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