RY X
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Ry X, interview: I was living in a hammock between two palm trees | Evening Standard | 4 November 2016 |

Ry X, interview: I was living in a hammock between two palm trees | Evening Standard | 4 November 2016 | | RY X | Scoop.it
About two-thirds of the way into my conversation with Ry Cuming I mention that we haven’t talked much about his music yet. “We don’t need to,” he says.

What we talk about instead, at length, is the tension between the act of making art and the act of selling it. As a certified beardy hippy who grew up on a sparsely populated Australian island, the idea of promoting his work and making money from it sits uneasily with him.

Yet the 32-year-old is succeeding, whether deliberately or not. His song Berlin made his name as Ry X, an atmospheric mix of picked acoustic guitar and cooing vocals that sounds as if it’s been recorded in a resonant church. In the three years since it arrived online its video has been watched more than 4.5 million times, been used in a colourful Sony Bravia advert and covered by Sam Smith.

“When I made that song it was one take, live, I just put it out and it connected with people and that’s beautiful,” he says. “But it was never intended to become what it became. That’s when art is at its most beautiful, when it’s authentic.”

He uses the word authentic a lot. He doesn’t mention the Sony clip but instead tells me in great detail about his decision to turn down an offer of $50,000 to use his music on a Unilever advert.

He’s written a duet for the mainstream pop stars Kelly Clarkson and John Legend (Run Run Run from 2015), and last month produced a remix of Rihanna’s Love on the Brain, but he is also heavily involved with the Berlin techno scene and runs a tiny music festival called Sacred Ground on a farm near the German-Polish border. 

“I’m so glad my music has reached a lot of people but the essence and integrity of it is what’s important to me,” he says. “Whether it sells, or charts, what I’ve discovered is that authenticity resonates with human beings. What transcends genre and style and hipness is rawness and authenticity and vulnerability and human nature. I’m way more excited about exploring that.” 

He seems to be following his nose through the music world. When the Berlin single created the kind of buzz that should have been capitalised on straight away with a Ry X album, he instead formed an electronic trio with British producer Adam Freeland and California producer Steve Napela and released a woozy, late-night album as The Acid.

The debut Ry X album, Dawn, finally arrived this May and gets a deserved reissue this week, before he plays his biggest London show later this month. Dawn is a thing of great beauty, one for the headphones with your eyes closed. Cuming’s high, soft voice is fuzzy round the edges. The sounds he creates are slow-moving and spiritual. 

He’s had a long journey to get here, sipping grapefruit juice in a café on Sunset Boulevard in LA. He’s been based in the city on and off for 10 years but has also lived in Indonesia, Costa Rica and Germany. He now has a partner and two pre-school children but is still resisting the urge to settle and is considering home-schooling. 

He romanticises his discovery as a musician. “I was living in a hammock between two palm trees in Costa Rica, playing music to a bunch of girls who were surfers. One of their boyfriends happened to be a film producer in LA and he invited me into this idea of making music as a more serious thing. He paid for a layover in LA on my way home and took me into offices where I played for people. I didn’t wear shoes or a shirt at that point in my life, so I didn’t understand anything about the industry.”

He ended up releasing a much more conventional singer-songwriter album as Ry Cuming in 2010. “It all got kind of rolled up and homogenised and overproduced and whittled down into this sellable thing. I’m so glad I had the opportunity to just leave all that behind. I thought I would never make music for the industry again.”

It was that experience, plus his unconventional childhood, that left him determined to make art for art’s sake. He grew up on Woodford Island in New South Wales, where he went to a school of just 11 children. “It’s essentially on this giant estuary in a river. It would flood and we would be locked on the island for three weeks or a month at a time. My parents were very much hippies but educated, intelligent, choosing-their-path hippies, if that makes sense. It’s hard for me to conform to normal society. Every day of my life is a challenge in that way. I don’t see the world the way that most people see it.”

In LA he practises yoga and surfs as much as possible, and although a frantic city isn’t his natural habitat there are plenty of like-minded people and endless artists with whom he can work.

He knows which side he’s on now. Come and join him.

Ry X plays O2 Shepherd’s Bush Empire, W12 (0844 477 2000, O2shepherdsbushempire.co.uk) on Nov 23. Dawn is out now on Infectious

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RY X Chats Busking In The Streets Of Australia, Thom Yorke, And Murakami’s ‘1Q84'

RY X Chats Busking In The Streets Of Australia, Thom Yorke, And Murakami’s ‘1Q84' | RY X | Scoop.it
Australian singer-songwriter RY X talks growing up in a small Australian coastal town, finding peace on the road, and connecting with the audience at his shows in non-traditional venues.
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[VIDEO] RY X - Salt :: Indie Shuffle | 12 July 2016

[VIDEO] RY X - Salt :: Indie Shuffle | 12 July 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
Why do we like this? RY X creates music that is painfully beautiful, and all the accompanying videos further accentuate that fact. Both melancholy and euphoric, "Salt" is a study in contrasts. Folk sensibilities meander alongside poignant electronic moments -- every note perfectly thought out. Strummed acoustic guitar and that lone vocal sets a tone of stark desolation, until slowly more layers are added - a brushed snare, a subtle kick, trembling strings, and a simple piano counter-melody, which wash in and out of the song at various moments. Eventually, a layering of his husky vocal builds into an emotional climax, and then it's over ... and I press repeat.
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RY X Schedules A Return Date At Vibiana | July 15th

RY X Schedules A Return Date At Vibiana | July 15th | RY X | Scoop.it
Australian singer-songwriter Ry Cuming, AKA RY X, will be in L.A. later this year! After performing a SOLD OUT all-ages show at the Masonic Lodge at Hollywood Forever in April, RY X has scheduled a 21+ "Rocktober" tour date at Vibiana on Tuesday, October 11, in support of his new album Dawn. Tickets to see RY X at Vibiana will go on sale this Friday, July 15, at 9:00 a.m. via Ticketfly for $18.00 to $43.00 each plus service fees. Click below to get your tickets to welcome RY X to his upcoming tour stop in Downtown Los Angeles!
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Album Review: RY X, ‘Dawn’ | Pop J | 9th May 2016

Album Review: RY X, ‘Dawn’ | Pop J | 9th May 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
Australian singer-songwriter Ry Cuming, who now goes by the stage name RY X, has always had one hand on his guitar and the other wiping away a tear. His second full album — following 2010’s self-titled, major label debut Ry Cuming — continues to elicit wistful emotion with his plaintive vocals, gentle guitar and tasteful electronic accompaniment. In Dawn, RY X continues along the lines of his sleeper 2013 single “Berlin” — which is the centrepiece of Dawn — a sparse, haze-like ballad that sounds like what loneliness would be if it were a pop song. Despite the ethereal, longing tone of Dawn, RY X’s sentiments are not unbearably forlorn. The production greatly helps the record from falling into a dolor dirge, swaying like a wave from quiet stripped-down acoustic guitar-vocal moments (“Sweat”) to crescendos of driving EDM synths (“Haste”). Dawn confidently wears its quiet, broken heart on its sleeve in a way that’s poignant, pop and powerful.
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REVIEW: Ry X – Dawn | Pressplay | 6th May 2016

REVIEW: Ry X – Dawn | Pressplay | 6th May 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
Ry X doesn’t believe in fucking about. The Australian artist known as Ryan Cuming (no guesses as to why that might have been changed) comes with minimal fanfare on his debut album Dawn. The songs are one-word statements of intent, the construction mainly around that celestial voice of his. No bad thing at all, mind. Of course, there’s the odd smattering of string, guitar, or in the case of Shortline, piano. That song in particular comes across like a more tolerable version the ubiquitous To Build A Home song by The Cinematic Orchestra, meaning it will probably be soundtracking emotional TV drama moments from here to Hollyoaks within a year. Still, in the hands of Cuming it’s the heady melange of what he does best – vocals nestling in the clouds, a measured approach to instrumentation, and knowing when to power his simple and emotional punches. Sometimes, however, it’s not quite enough. In fact, it can result in a song becoming quite laborious in the anticipation of that punch, which in the case of songs like Salt and Howling never come. It’s never quite clear what Cuming is trying to achieve with these songs, with even the latter’s coda – a furious flurry of beats and drums – never quite living up the gut-wrench of its title. Similarly, the six minutes of Beacon result in impressive orchestral manoeuvres but very little overall impact. Still, there’s more than enough to merit here beyond the obvious Bon Iver hangover (rather evident in the final furlong). Deliverance is a succinct capsule of what Cuming does best, but it would help if his packaging came with a lot more weight – it’s not entirely inaccurate to see those tears painted on his face on the cover, as so too does some of this record seem deliberately affected. For now though he’s treading the most glorious water as his Dawn breaks; where Ry X goes in the harsh light of day will be very interesting to see.
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Rolling Stone Australia — Album Review: RY X - Dawn | 16th May 2016

Rolling Stone Australia — Album Review: RY X - Dawn | 16th May 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it

He came to our attention through electronic collaborations such as that with Ame's Frank Wiedemann on "Howling", but RY X, born Ry Cuming, was a Jeff Buckley-loving folkie long before that. His debut LP is largely beat-free and doesn't suffer for it; Cuming's crushed-heart cooing and placid plucking need little furnishing. An acoustic "Howling" is still a standout on Dawn, but "Only" is equally as beautiful with Cuming's layered falsetto recalling Bon Iver, while "Haste" rides on a tasteful pulsing bassline. It all floats along at the same mopily melancholic pace, but Cuming's introspection is never insular; his world feels like ours, too.

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Review: RY X Stretches Pop Structures on ‘Dawn’ | NY Times | 4th May 2016

Review: RY X Stretches Pop Structures on ‘Dawn’ | NY Times | 4th May 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
“Dawn,” the new album by the Australian songwriter and producer RY X (born Ry Cuming), floats in a gorgeous, dolorous haze. His voice is a pearly, androgynous tenor, a vessel for liquid melancholy that blurs words at the edges. He stretches pop structures with repetition that grows devotional, obsessive, hypnotic. When he sings about love and desire, he places himself at a confluence of the intimate and the sacred. On “Salt,” he sings: We let love be like water to wine We let love be the higher design We let love be a call in the night We let love be the fire divine. His music often suggests two other mantric, ethereal songwriters — Jeff Buckley and James Blake — and in a way, RY X has created a bridge between two awkwardly named but emotionally charged genres, psych-folk and future-R&B. An acoustic guitar or slow-moving keyboard chords are usually at the center of his productions. In some places they are all there is, but then echoes open up boundless spaces around him, other instruments waft in and his voice multiplies itself. Dance beats sometimes arrive with a subdued four-on-the-floor thump, as in “Deliverance,” but not always; RY X likes waltzes, too, including “Only,” which starts out folky and turns choirlike and reverential. Photo Like many other 21st-century ballad singers, RY X has dance-music connections. Between the release in 2013 of his first EP as RY X, “Berlin,” and his new album, he made albums with two electronics-oriented projects, the Acid and Howling. (As Ry Cuming, he also made a self-titled 2010 album of pop-rock songs that only held glimmers of his current style.) But all the other recordings were just groundwork. “Dawn” brings a craftsman’s subliminal assurance to songs that seem to materialize entirely on their own terms, with an organic ebb and flow. “Beacon” starts out as a small string ensemble and then an acoustic, fingerpicked, undulating waltz — “I fall into your mind’s eye,” RY X sings — but by the end it is awash in electric-guitar feedback and his incantatory voice, singing wordless ahs. He’s both supplicant and shaper.
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Review: RY X - 'Dawn' | the interns | 9th May 2016

Review: RY X - 'Dawn' | the interns | 9th May 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
It is raining. No, scratch that, it is pouring a torrential rain, and there you stand. For moments at a time you wonder whether to run for shelter, or just stand and let the rain hit you. That is the experience of listening to RY X‘s debut studio album, Dawn, a rapturous body of work that, while not necessarily breaking any new ground, prevails through the journey that it takes. In a sense, it seems rather fitting that RY X’s album has seen its release the same day that London crooner James Blake has announced the surprise release of his third full-length effort. The comparisons between the pair are written on the wall, obvious, and yet not so much in a way that might condemn RY X to being a ‘short of the mark’ imitation act. Indeed, the comparison is relegated to being just that – a comparison. RY X does just enough to singularly define himself as an artist all of his very own. The same comparisons could be made between RY X and Bon Iver, still only a comparison but a prestigious comparison nonetheless, particularly on tracks such as ‘Salt‘ and ‘Howling‘, which happen to follow one another. Incorporating the haunting, elongated vocals familiar from artists such as the aforementioned Bon Iver, while also maintaining a minimalist (but no less impactful) beat beneath the vocals, allows RY X’s album to flow as smoothly as his vocals do. That one can even make the audible comparison between RY X’s vocals and Anohni’s vocals (another artist dropping a new album today) is another enormous statement, and testament, to RY X as an artist. It needn’t matter, and doesn’t matter, that the comparisons and the similarities are only slight – it’s merely a means to aptly describe just how powerful RY X sounds on Dawn. It should have been enough that I was on the verge of tears by the time track five, ‘Only‘, came around, but evidently by the track’s end it wasn’t nearly enough. Tears began to flow, as nostalgia both happy and sad transmitted through the words – and album highlight ‘Berlin‘ (yes, still retaining its immense value despite seeing its initial release some years ago) only further lubricated the profound story of genuine emotion that I had begun to feel as a listener. Strength to strength is not really an adequate way to describe the smooth transition from ‘Berlin‘ to the seventh track of Dawn, ‘Beacon‘ but since it is so hard to describe it in any other way, one assumes that it must have to suffice for the purposes of this review. Of course the album is not a project made up entirely of highlights, as tracks such as ‘Deliverance‘ regrettably see RY X overuse his strong vocals and poorly match the backing track to the very same, and the song itself eventuates to sound quite grating to the ears. Even the track that follows it, ‘Haste‘ is one which sees a great deal of inconsistency, as RY X would appear to be flirting with the idea of interpolating pop elements in to his music where it, inarguably, does not fit. Thankfully, however, it is only a short-lived venture by the artist – as he returns to the sound he carries easiest for the album’s three closing tracks which drift the album as a whole out so totally, so profoundly and so emotionally that it strikes almost akin to the news of a fallen love one. Or a painful break-up. The album’s second to last track, ‘Sweat‘ sweaters to usurp the brilliant highlight ‘Berlin‘, which had come before it, purely by means of how raw and accessible the emotion conveyed on the track is. Ultimately, RY X’s debut studio album is an extraordinary emotional journey, and a fantastic testament to the man himself as an artist. It is, in no way, an unfamiliar sound. Nor does it explore themes or content which is unfamiliar, but nonetheless it succeeds in not sounding repetitive or as though an imitation act. While RY X may fall just short of achieving a level suggestive that he deserves the recognition reserved for an artistic superstar, he does more than enough to prove himself worth watching – and the album worth listening to, and continuing to revisit. For a debut studio album, perhaps one can’t ask for more than what Dawn succeeds in delivering.
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RY X's Heart Beats For The Love Of Music | Nylon | 18 April 2016

RY X's Heart Beats For The Love Of Music | Nylon | 18 April 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it

The first time that most of us first heard Ry X was around 2013. At the time, a good friend of mine insisted that the Australian singer-songwriter was going to be the next big breakout artist and that I should keep an eye on him. That same year, he released the Berlin EP, a collection of songs that felt like fragments belonging to the most gentle of souls. Growing up on a tiny island in Australia, Ry Cuming spent a majority of his time exploring. The two central things that surrounded his life were always music and the ocean, so learning how to play the guitar was a natural progression. Between all of the records and instruments lying around his house, Cuming’s parents saw the potential in his musical abilities and fully committed to his craft by investing in a teacher for him. “When you’re a little kid, you don’t think about that. It’s almost a chore to have to go to your music lessons, but I’m really thankful that they committed to that when they didn’t have any money and it was a lot of effort for everybody,” he said. “I just loved music so much when I was a kid, and it was a natural progression from there to try to figure out how to play it. To me, that came mostly from all the old stuff and experimental music that I would listen to from my dad’s record collection and progressing to grunge. That’s when I really started to play a lot of music, once I heard that rawness of emotion through grunge and through artists like Jeff Buckley, as well. That was the time for me when it all shifted.” From there, Cuming started playing grunge music in his own punk bands, the polar opposite of the type of music that he makes now. “My skate-surf friends and I had long hair and would paint our nails black. I’d go on stage in no shirt and mosh, and stage dive, and thrash around,” he said. “That was how I learned to perform, being in front of people as a performer and singer, expressing raw emotions. I think that helped, you know? It helped me understand how to give honestly without having to try to be this character on stage.” Now as we know, he performs under the moniker RY X. When Cuming isn’t focused on his solo project, he also plays in a three-piece electronic band called The Acid. It’s been a while, but the Aussie is finally ready to unleash the next phase of RY X with his forthcoming album, Dawn, set for release on May 6 via Loma Vista. In Cuming’s own words, “I’ve loved staying out of the radar these last few years, but there are a lot of people talking about it. That makes me nervous because suddenly there’s a hint of expectation, but I think the music has to speak first. It’s ultimately a record that is really sharing the different aspects of who I am, and I really think it’s a beautiful first sharing of an album that allows a lot of exploration beyond. There are a lot of different heart pieces on this record and I’m excited to make sure that people can resonate with it in their own way and connect to the different aspects of it. It’s been a journey since that Berlin EP, doing the “Howling” record with Frank in Berlin, then touring those projects and getting to explore a lot of different musical aspects. It took me a long time to come back to my heart place and to try to get back into that zone where I could be raw and honest and naked and stripped, and record that way and share music that way.” Get to know more about RY X’s humble beginnings in the interview, below. Music has been such a huge part of your life. Did you always feel like it was your calling or know that you would pursue it as a career? I think the beauty of the way that I grew up is that I didn’t have that mindset that a lot of people have. “Go to college, get a job.” I grew up with really cool parents and a really alternative kind of mindset, and it was much more about following the heart than it was about thinking about what job you’re going to have when you finish school. I left home when I was 16 or 17 and went traveling around the world. I guess I still do that. I think what was more important than a job or career was experience—human experience, heart experience. As long as I’m doing the music that I love and it belongs to the heart experience, it’s awesome. Suddenly, music became a shitty job for me and I was trying to keep up with the pop world and all of that. I didn’t think it would be part of my path anymore, but it’s so riled up with what I love doing, and I think the key is that you stay in that place where it’s not work. It’s not a job. But I did love a lot of other things. I’ve always loved fashion and expression, I always loved explorative architecture. And then, from my roots, my mom’s been a yoga teacher for about 40 years, and I often considered doing more yoga teaching and stuff. I’d always had a really strong yoga practice, and there’s been different thoughts. It doesn’t mean that those things weren’t a part of my life too, at certain points. I’m finding myself now more creatively directing projects and directing videos. Who knows? I think the most important thing is staying present and staying connected to what you’re doing at the time. Given that you’ve traveled to so many places, what are some of your favorite cities that you’ve lived in? Living in Indonesia was really beautiful. It was really crucial for me to just kind of tap out of the rest of society and have a more instant mindset and no mirrors. Simple things, like choosing not to look in a mirror, is a really powerful thing to do. To be on an island somewhere in Indonesia, just surfing and doing yoga and being connected to your body... that was a really crucial part of my life. That’s one of my favorite places to live. Berlin has a really dear place in my heart, obviously, and is still, as far as cities go in the world, one of the most palpable, interesting places. It was pretty amazing to live in Costa Rica. Ironically, I lived in California on and off for almost 12 years. It was an accident that I arrived here but, eventually, something here started resonating with me. I think there must be something powerful about my relationship to L.A. and to California, even though I wouldn’t outwardly think of it as the dreamiest place to live in the world. There is something that really captivates me about creating work here and having this as one of my bases in the world. I think it’s really that balance. And then obviously, you know, how could I go past Australia and Byron Bay where I grew up. It’s paradise. I’m really lucky to be able to stay where I love and gravitate towards that. It’s not something a lot of people get to do. I think more people could do it if they chose it, if they decided, “Okay, I love being here. I’ve arrived in Byron Bay, Australia and I love it, and yeah I’ve got a job back home, but why don’t I just follow my heart instead.” That is a decision that I’ve made a lot in my life. I’m going to stay because I love it, because I’m connected to it right now and I want to be here. There are different places that don’t feel right, as well. I think there are different places in the world that resonate with us at different times in our lives. When we’re 17, places are going to feel really different versus when we’re 30. It’s great that you were really able to explore your full creativity and tap into these other projects like The Acid and then come back to Ry X when you were ready. How did you maintain that control? It’s really hard because of the industry. There were a lot of people in my camp that were excited, and the amount of connection that the Berlin EP had... that was a little bit of a surprise, I guess, how far that went. Turning around and everyone’s like, “Okay, let’s put out an album. Where’s the next single?” I just had to be honest and really direct about the industry itself and say, “Look, I’m not there right now. I’m not going to turn around in a fortnight. I’m making this music with The Acid, let’s put that out and follow that through. Let’s wait until there’s some material there.” I’m glad, too. There are a lot of songs on the record for me, like “Beacon,” that I needed time to write, and that was a special one for me. What are some of the themes of some of the material on this album? So much of when I’m making RY X music is, like I was saying before, taking time to get back to my heart. I have to surf and be open and meditate and be away from cities. It takes a while to get back into that space. Once I get there, I think a lot of the material starts becoming part of myself, like a dialogue from myself, like an open diary. It’s weird because you’re writing these songs and you’re writing these incredibly raw, honest things, and then, at that time, I’m not really thinking that a lot of people are going to hear it. I think a lot of my material is like that—I’m writing something really personal about an experience that I’ve had in my life; very direct, experiential references. And then I turn around and I’m suddenly sharing them with the world, you know, six months later, or a year later. It’s a weird feeling. I guess the themes are interpersonal connection: love, passion, the conflicts that come between us in the world. One of the hardest parts of the album was, this idea of the space between lust and love. Like, what is it? What is the difference? What are the different relationships? So exploring these small... when you talk about it, it seems small... but these massive realities in our lives. What is true love? What is committed love? The music video for “Only” is gorgeous. How did you get involved with directing and then coming up with the concept of that entire visual? It takes a lot of trust for a label to be able to allocate money to an artist with an idea. I had to build that relationship over time, because when I go in and I’m conceptualizing it’s basically me and one guy, Dugan, who’s one of my dear brothers out here in L.A. We direct all the videos together. Working with him, it’s like any art-making process, it’s almost ethereal. You come up with a concept and you start building on this concept and you talk about it and you navigate it and you find a thread, and then, how do we tell the story visually without having to be narrative, without having to be in this disgusting music video reality that a lot of people try to jump into with tons and edits and blah blah... It’s like, nonsense. I’ve really been trying to make pieces of art visually. That’s been much more important to me than making a music video, making a piece of art that you can watch with the sound off and it’s still captivating. Something that carries a deeper intention of the viewing itself. I basically just gathered my community from LA and knew what people were amazing at. You put these people in and you know they can hold themselves onscreen in a certain way. You don’t have to overly direct. You just trust. So really it’s gathering the best artists that we know, playing the EP, and then putting them inside this world, this concept, this feeling. It’s a feeling—not the narrative, but the emotion behind it—and letting them carry it for us. Obviously, there’s the technical aspect and there’s the emotional, creative, spiritual aspect, and both of them can be explored to their depths. You can talk about lenses and gear... But really, for me, it’s so much about the intention and the emotion behind it.

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Last month, RY X gave us the chilling “Only”, the... | Machine Factory

Last month, RY X gave us the chilling “Only”, the... | Machine Factory | RY X | Scoop.it

Last month, RY X gave us the chilling “Only”, the lead single from his debut album Dawn out in the coming month or so. Today, The Acid frontman shared the endearing, piano-led cut “Deliverance”, in which the singer/songwriter casts yet another spell over us with an impeccably fragile and controlled vocal delivery. Listen above and get lost to the beauty…

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ONLY & DELIVERANCE | HUNGRY DRUMS | 11 April 2016

Ry Cuming, the Aussie-born, LA-based artist known as RY X, is leading up to the May release of his debut solo album Dawn. We are pretty stoked to hear it based on listening to the first two releases: 'Only' and 'Deliverance'. They are both brilliant, stand-alone tracks so it will be pretty incredible getting a full album's worth soon.
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Première écoute : « Deliverance » de RY X | Hello Coton | 5 April 2016

On pensait déjà que RY X avait réussi à sortir la plus belle chanson de l’année 2014 avec « Sweat ». Et voilà que vient l’album… Dawn, et « Deliverance », un nouvel extrait d’une violente intensité mélancolique. « Deliverance » c’est un piano nébuleux, puis quelques plats électro de basse et rythmiques de percu syncopées, qui se mêlent aux harmonies de voix planantes de l’artiste. C’est si simple, et pourtant si beau et si puissant… On a peur de ne pas se remettre de l’album, prévu le 6 mai prochain (Infectious Records/Pias).
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RY X : 'As an artist you’re not bound by culture or nationality' | Independent | 16 June 2017 |

RY X : 'As an artist you’re not bound by culture or nationality' | Independent | 16 June 2017 | | RY X | Scoop.it
In person RY X is perhaps not the person you’d imagine is behind those wintry, haunting vocals. 

Tanned and with a wonderful, warm disposition, he sits in a dressing room where he’s resting before his first show at Berlin’s Konzerthaus, an imposing, ornate building in the city’s central Mitte district.

“I’m just trying to rise to it, you know? It’s pretty crazy. I’ve been trying to make a lineage for myself playing really beautiful, non-traditional spaces. And we’re kind of pushing the boundaries now, aren’t we?” he says laughing.

He’s determined to create something that makes people feel a change as they walk into the space, before the music has even begun. 

“Walking into a concert hall… there’s a reverence, a humility that comes with it. I still feel like Berlin is my home in Europe. But when you tell people who’ve grown up here about playing Konzerthaus they’re like, ‘wow’.

“It’s very strange to get out of a cab in front of it, with thousands of tourists posing on the stairs, and to walk up that red carpet and into the venue, then go, ‘Hi, I’m performing here’.”

Before he came onstage, dancers gave an exquisite performance that transitioned smoothly into the music – a visual expression of what he tries to do with his work. And the performance itself is exquisite: RY X is backed by an orchestra as his voice fills this stunning venue, with the audience holding their breath until the very last note of a song.

“With dance you definitely get a lot of emotion,” Ry says, noting that it’s something that he’s often used in his music videos.

“For ‘Berlin’, the woman in the video was my partner at the time, my lover, my girl. So it was this dance of love that was very organic, there was nothing orchestrated. I think there’s a way to move through life in that kind of way, to be poetic.”

There’s obviously something about the city that appeals to him quite strongly – he believes that it’s a sense of freedom and acceptance, “not just for me but for everybody”. 

“You get that in London or New York but there’s more of a judgement. I think the key to that, the way that it feels here, is that it still feels like the people control the city,” he says. “It’s a really beautiful place to belong to.” 

With one of his frequent collaborators, Frank Wiedemann, he organises a small festival called Sacred Ground on a farm west of Berlin. 

“It’s a lot of work, Frank and I invite our favourite artists to come, it’s very egalitarian, all the artists get paid the same amount,” he explains. “All the food is organic, there’s a very low environmental impact. It’s really cool. 

“We tend to get people who are much bigger than we really should, people who headline the bigger festivals around Europe. There’s a sense of freedom though, I think, for artists not to feel the pressure of performing in front of 20,000 people.”

Born in Angourie, New South Wales, the artist born Ry Cuming now lives in LA, where he can go surfing before heading over the studio.

“It’s a crazy f***ing place,” he says. “I don’t really adhere to Hollywood at all, I live on the outskirts. But there’s an amazing artist community there. 

“There’s been a mass exodus from New York to LA recently. People like Si [Bonobo], we’re label buddies on my other project with Frank, and it’s quite lovely to be able to run in to him, talk about what we’re doing. There’s no competition. I think it’s really nice to have an eclectic community of international people.

“It seems ridiculous to create borders. I think the reason people are trying to do Brexit or Trump trying to build his wall is out of fear, because the world is opening up, people are becoming more egalitarian and connected in so many ways. The key is for artists to band together, for people to say ‘let’s get engaged’.”

Several artists have noted an irony in how music is becoming “borderless”, as they draw on influences from around the world and audiences, in turn, become more willing to listen to other cultures, other languages. 

“In modern pop you hear influences from India, the Caribbean… it’s really prominent,” Ry says. “You can have these aspects of place that comes into your scene, and people are like, ‘this is English’. And you say, ‘it’s not!’. 

“As a real artist you’re not bound by culture or nationality. It should be about whatever expression you like. You hear it all the time in music, in something like pop that draws on reggaeton. Whatever you’re referencing has a lineage, but as an artist you don’t want to be judged on what the style is, you want to be judged on how it makes you feel, what the reaction is. 

“It’s easy to say it’s appropriating, but there’s so much richness in music and culture around the world, why would you limit yourself as an artist? The difficulty in the pop world, which is why I’ve stayed out of it, is that people feel like they have to be successful, so you start copying what other successful artists are doing.”

He has some experience of the pop world himself, having toured with Maroon 5 and witnessed Sam Smith perform a cover of his song “Berlin”.

“I think it’s cool when the pop world comes knocking on your door, and it’s happened more often than you’d think,” he says. “Rihanna asked me to remix a song, other high-profile artists have asked me to write for them. For me it doesn’t matter at what profile it comes in, it’s the work that matters.

“Someone like Sia, who I know, came up to me years ago, and said she wanted to write pop songs. And I wasn’t there yet, but she went for it. And I think it’s amazing when someone goes, ‘I’m ready’. She’s authentic, she’s honest, she creates environments for people.

”He’s writing a lot himself at the moment and says he has around “20 or 30 songs” under his RY X moniker, plus a dozen more for each of his other projects.

“I think the next RY X album is about shifting the sound a little bit, finding a new energy without losing the emotion in the lyrics, that authenticity. It’s really nice that people connected to the honesty in it.”

All bar one of the tracks on his debut Dawn had one-word titles, as though he was trying to express a singular emotion through one song. 

“I don’t think anybody knows half of what I’m saying lyrically, and that’s alright,” he muses. “I think I write in a lot of metaphors and analogies. It’s very personal to me, when I write. Even things that I wouldn’t sit and discuss with a friend, I’ll put on the record. It’s kind of a weird thing to do,” he adds laughing.

“Next year there’ll be a full album, and probably two or three songs out before that. An album is years of work. And at some point you wake up and think, do I still feel like how I did 18 months ago? That’s why I really like the A- and B-side platform too, like how hip hop’s done, and house and techno music as well. Over the year you might release 10 singles, and that might become an album.” 

After touring almost non-stop for four years, he’s exhausted, but also “very humbled”. 

“But I think it’s time for me to get into a sort of cocoon,” he decides. “Make a bunch of work, and find out what the new heartbeats and energies are.”
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Ry X Announces European Tour and Releases Video For 'Salt'. - Shake The Static | 11 July 2016

Ry X Announces European Tour and Releases Video For 'Salt'. - Shake The Static | 11 July 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
Following on from his powerfully performed live shows this passed May, Ry X has announced plans to return to Europe during the Winter months, including a show at London’s Shepherd’s Bush Empire. To coincide, the LA-based Australian singer has also unveiled a beautiful new video for Salt, taken from his debut album ‘Dawn’ out now via Infectious Records. As with each new release, Salt instantly transports me to the transcendent beauty of his most recent London shows where I was enraptured in a thick hazy fog within the holy bones of a candlelit church. This man is a miracle worker with a celestial presence that draws you into an unconsciously calming existence and leaves you floating there long after he has disappeared into the shadows of the night. This is the perfect antidote to help mellow out your Monday. Let Ry X’s fragile vocals and the plaintive strings of his threadbare productions soothe you into a deeply solemn state of mind. Tickets go on sale on Friday 15th July at 9am. Get them here. Watch/ listen to Salt below.
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#Inspiration - Singer Songwriter RY X | July 19th 2016

#Inspiration - Singer Songwriter RY X | July 19th 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
Ever since I came across RY X's song "Always Remember Me" (he used to go by Ry Cuming then) I have been a huge fan of his work. Since then he has developed, along with a great beard, a darker and more vibey sound. He recently dropped a phenomenal project called Dawn. Check him out you will not be disappointed.
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Ry X on the success of Dawn & creating a unique live experience for fans – the AU review | 27th May 2016

Ry X on the success of Dawn & creating a unique live experience for fans – the AU review | 27th May 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
Seated across the road from Brighton’s Copperdollar Studios on a chilly Friday afternoon, Ry X is digging into some food ahead of a session slotted into his schedule at The Great Escape. “Would you like some?” he asks, offering me some of his meal as I join him on the bench. I gratefully decline, knowing how tightly our scheduled interview slot is running, though you’d never know, to be in the presence of someone as laid-back as Ry. “Of course, I’m here for you,” he says, as I thank him for his time. The rise of Ry X’s profile in that last year has been considerable and for Australian fans, possibly slightly sudden. Since relocating to the vastly different surrounds of both Berlin and Los Angeles, the NSW native has been working solidly on generating a name for himself as producer, songwriter, vocalist and ethereal live performer. It’s an approach to crafting music that finally led him to the release of his debut solo album in Dawn (out now). The album has only officially been out a few weeks but already, its swirling atmospheric nature has struck a chord with live crowds both in Europe and through the US. Posters of the album’s artwork can currently be seen plastered throughout the London Underground, while street press beckons you to listen to the record on Spotify. For audiences at The Great Escape, Ry’s set at St. George’s Church later on that night was a highly anticipated one and man, did he pull one hell of a live experience. “I can feel it at the moment,” he says, as we talk about this momentum surrounding Dawn. “I can feel a bit of a shift. I’ve put a tonne of energy into the live show; I just really want the live show to grow into this really amazing point, where it’s more than the record, even. It’s really starting to get there now and it feels really consolidated and exciting every night. It’s different every night and it’s growing and expanding; the response has been amazing. I definitely feel the energy from people, which is the best.” While it may be some time yet before Australia will see Ry return home with his new music, the idea of the sun kissed beaches of home is never far from his mind. “I thought about moving out to Byron many, many times. I really have.” he says. “Especially because I’ve been touring so much, this idea of going out to just surf, do yoga and hang out afterwards just sounds incredibly romantic to me. Though, I also recognise how important for me it is at the moment to be in a community of people who are pushing boundaries, that are really focused on making good art and creating social change in the world as well.” “Obviously that happens in places like Byron and Melbourne and Sydney, but I’ve just sown the seeds in these places for a long time, especially living in and out of Berlin and in and out of LA. Those two places have been like home for a very long time. I definitely still feel, in my heart, that the Byron area is my home. It’s just a shame that they’re all about a 10-12 hour flight from each other! I need some frequent flyer miles happening!” In describing the music of Dawn within the live space that Ry has come to really flourish within over recent months of touring, he explains the importance put upon ensuring each sound on record is given as much room to breathe and grow as possible during the show. A reliance on a backing mix or set up of tracks is one Ry’s not content to become dependent upon and as a result, he’s found himself to be pushing his live shows into territories he’s not previously ventured. “To not have a computer on stage,” he enthuses, when asked what his favourite part of touring currently is. “Not playing backing tracks and having really humble, amazing players with me – from a technical standpoint, we have a lot going on. We’ve got a lot of old analogue synths, we’ve got broken down mass drum kits, piano, organ…there’s three of us in the core thing and we loop a lot of stuff and create a lot of soundscapes.” “It’s almost done in a Sigur Rós way,” Ry adds. “We can grow it and expand into eight or nine minute versions of songs. It’s really hard work, to be able to do some of those things without a computer, because it’s what everybody relies on on stage these days, but I really wanted it to breathe and flow. To not have it be orientated around that nonsense, frankly. In the last handful of shows, I’ve brought in a cello and viola player, which is really amazing as well. We’re just going for this really beautiful and real palette of sound where you’ve got synths and you’ve got this stuff expanding, but it’s around this core of musical instruments.” It’s not easy to bring this full set up on the road, he admits. Still, establishing this evocative live music experience for his fans keeps things fresh and it means that for Ry, the process of seeing where his music can continue to develop outside the studio becomes an even more textured and colourful one. “It takes a lot of work,” he admits. “It takes tonnes more rehearsals, it takes way more money and it takes more energy. It takes writing new parts, it takes pulling songs apart that you put on a record and learning how to play them in a different way. That also makes it better. People have been doing it a long time, whether it’s Radiohead or Björk, these people have found a way to integrate electronics with live stuff. This massive sound with only a few people, keeping it really real and really tactile. I work really hard on curating a whole experience within the venue so that people come along and it’s this immersive world where they just dive into it.”
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'Dawn" by Ry X Album Review: A Confident Debut Rethinking The Genre - uInterview | 11th May 2016

'Dawn" by Ry X Album Review: A Confident Debut Rethinking The Genre - uInterview | 11th May 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
The instrumental title track opens with exuberant textures of strings. “Shortline” draws the listener in with the pervasive vocals, gentle and lush over an almost unnoticeable synth melodic line. The track then takes off after the first verse with layered vocals, minimal piano and soft beats that chase each other until the end of the track. Ry X’s fluid, melancholic vocals can be compared to those of Keaton Henson, James Blake and Justin Vernon. The characteristic stripped back arrangements expose a raw and vulnerable quality of his voice. Thematically, the album matches the tonal quality of the tracks – the atmospheric fragility of Ry X’s voice is in tune with the subjects of love strife and spiritual search. The lead single “Only” is an intimate track that gradually builds up and soars. The soft guitar starts off with an almost folksy feel, and the piano adds deeply emotional undertones. RY X’s repetitive, echoing vocals have an ethereal quality that is thought-provoking and moving. On tracks like “Deliverance” and “Haste,” it is clear that Ry X is trying out a new formula. These tracks start off slow with the vocals dominating the soundscape and eventually including a plethora of unexpected sounds. Added to the acoustic guitar and slow keys that usually shape the core of most of his songs are more aggressive club-oriented beats as the track lifts off, which gives a new quality to his atmospheric, ethereal sound. Dawn also features the previously released hits “Howling” and “Berlin,” to which the artist owes most of his popularity prior to his debut full-length release. Both tracks sound just as fresh in their new context and seem to fit right in with the rest of the album’s content. Ry X’s music can hardly be placed in a specific genre category. It is electronic and indie; it is folk and R&B – it exists in a category that is distinctly its own and continuously pushes its own boundaries. Ultimately, Dawn is a goosebump-inducing album with a lot to offer in terms of ingenuity and vocal clarity. It is quite possibly the best debut of the year so far.
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Review: RY X, St Thomas the Martyr | Bristol 24/7 | 25th May 2016

Review: RY X, St Thomas the Martyr | Bristol 24/7 | 25th May 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
Australian singer-songwriter Ry Cuming has been a busy man the past few years. Originally releasing (slightly boring) acoustic pop music under his own name, a quiet period saw a metamorphosis from crooning surfer boy into a mysterious, murmuring shaman, dropping his somewhat unfortunate surname for the ever enigmatic 'X'. The 2013 single Berlin, hauntingly fragile with its hushed falsetto and reverb-heavy guitar, received widespread acclaim and showcased his evolution into a much darker, edgier sound. After touring extensively with the collaborative electronica piece The Acid (who sound exactly like what you’d expect from a band called The Acid), Cuming returned to focussing on his solo work, releasing his debut album Dawn earlier in 2016. His UK tour has seen him playing a string of dates at churches across the country, with the Redcliffe church St Thomas the Martyr his chosen sanctum for Bristol. Candles are lit, the audience files into the pews and the last of the sunlight shines through the windows above as a four-piece band plays the opening of Shortline. Dressed all in black, RY X walks between them and, from the first line, his voice resonates soulfully over the congregation. Cuming has honed his sound, using minimalistic effects and percussion to build swelling soundscapes, with sparse dance beats on Deliverance full of aching and urgency. The church is a perfect venue, with the band’s strings and choral vocals sounding appropriately holy, along with the religious overtones of lyrics such as “We let love like water to wine / We let love be the higher design” on Salt and the refraining proclamation of “Hold me love/So I can keep from hiding” on Hold Me Love. Cuming appears preacher-like himself, hands clasped in gratitude and describing everything as beautiful: his band, the crowd, the church, the city. Perhaps that’s what living in LA does to you. Receiving a standing ovation (certainly for the great music and not because of the unforgiving pews) RY X returns for an encore of Only, a sorrowful acoustic number that echoes rapturously. Hallelujah.
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RY X - Dawn [Album Review] | Acid Stag | 19th May 2016

RY X - Dawn [Album Review] | Acid Stag | 19th May 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
I was first introduced to RY X’s dulcet voice when ‘Basic Instinct’ by The Acid came on the radio whilst I was driving to work on a rainy day a couple of years ago. It floored me. I was so taken aback by the simplicity, the soul, the dynamics, it was exactly what I enjoy in an artist and in music. Naturally, I became obsessed. I tracked down everything he’d made, who he was, where he came from. My research led me to The Acid (of course), an amalgamation of British producer Adam Freeland, Calfornian producer/music wizard Steve Nalepa and Ry Cuming, an Australian singer/songwriter. From here I also found Howling, another of Ry’s projects with Berlin’s Frank Wiedemann. And finally, I found Ry’s solo work, under the name RY X. Needless to say, it was a solid day of musical discovery. All three projects were so diverse, clever, unique and just so fucking enjoyable. I was set for weeks. But what kept me coming back was the strength of the songs and what RY X’s musicality, songwriting and voice brought to the table. Fast forward to now, we finally have Dawn, Ry’s highly anticipated debut full length LP with the solo project. As I write these words, I’m already deep into my third straight listen. And after three listens I don’t recall listening to a stronger collection of music. Bits and pieces have trickled out over time, ‘Berlin’ came out in 2013 and since became a regular on countless “Chill Sundays” or “Acoustic Afternoon” (etc) Spotify playlists. It was incredibly popular, I’ve found that so many people know that song without knowing who it belongs to, I think because it hits you so hard on first listen. ‘Shortline’ came out a few years ago. He put ‘Sweat’ out last year, initially as an unmixed demo, but everyone lost their minds, so it was quickly followed by a more polished version. He also unveiled ‘Only’ and ‘Deliverance’ prior to the album’s release, both of which are absolutely stunning, and exciting. While ‘Only’ was reminiscent of his acoustic anterior work, ‘Deliverance’ features an almost electronic musical environment that reminds me of his work with The Acid. It’s great to see an expansion of the boundaries of this solo project. From Dawn, ‘Haste’ sits on a similar spectrum with the 112bpm (approx.) four-to-the-floor feel and the use of some very tasteful electronic synths that seem to compliment the song beautifully instead of taking away from his normally relaxed, ambient beginnings. Here are my top three moments from Dawn: 3. ‘Salt’, big fat tuna sandwich. 2. The last few minutes from ‘Beacon’, Ry builds this incredible soundscape thats so immersive and enveloping. Loved it. 1. Honestly, just the album as a whole. From start to finish, the way it was intended. There isn’t a single track that doesn’t belong or is lacking in any way. For me, I think it will go into my ‘very special album’ category. Dawn is cohesive, vibrant and an early contender for my favourite of 2016.
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Ry X - Dawn | DIY Mag | 6th May 2016

Ry X - Dawn | DIY Mag | 6th May 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
From alter-ego Howling to The Acid, Ry X has been a man with fingers in many musical pies to say the least, but the distinctive fragility of his performance has remained central to all he’s put his hand to. Although the opening interlude does little to set the tone with its frankly drab orchestral washes, the subsequent ‘Shortline’ sees Ry X demonstrate his ability to draw you in before unravelling an all-consuming web of lush textures and subtle swells – it’s the most lasting interpretation of this track to date. ‘Howling’ remains an evergreen standout of Ry’s work, and while both of these tracks, along with ‘Berlin’ have been released in various formats across Ry’s projects in the past, they feel as at home within the full-length ‘Dawn’ as they have anywhere else. Having reconsidered his outlook following that failed first crack as a musician, Ry’s unique and refined visions have always been worn on his sleeve, and his desire to realise them authentically have been key to his success. It would be easy to reduce the ideas on ‘Dawn’ to a return to his early work as Ry X – the threadbare productions of the ‘Berlin’ EP – but there’s so much more offered through this record. Rather than attempting to carve out a new niche or stripping everything back to its roots, ‘Dawn’ draws on everything that Ry has absorbed in recent years, and projects with fresh perspective. Six years on from his album as Ry Cuming, ‘Dawn’ is the debut he can truly treasure.
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[LISTEN] RY X - Only :: Indie Shuffle

[LISTEN] RY X - Only :: Indie Shuffle | RY X | Scoop.it

Why do we like this? NEW RY X ! Yessssss. 


 The first bit of new music we've heard from the wandering folkman for a long time, "Only" is a beautifully desolate song which relies on the simplicity of that forlorn vocal, and lone acoustic guitar to create suspense. Added bits of production flares, and the wailing of an electric guitar serve to add that extra bit of emotional intensity to the track. I love it all! Dawn will be released on May 6th. Keep an eye and ear out, I'm sure it's going to be breathtakingly beautiful.

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Ry X - "Dawn" | SJE Oxford | April 2016

Ry X - "Dawn" | SJE Oxford | April 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it
Metropolis Music presents 
 Ry X 

 RY X – Dawn 

 Ry X was born into the wild. Marooned in Angourie, a tiny island community off Australia’s east coast, he spent his formative years running around naked – clothes weren’t a big deal – swimming, surfing and milking the family’s goats. They’d go days without seeing a car and would be flooded in for weeks at a time when the river rose. Ry has been striving to find that same purity ever since he left home as a grunge-obsessed kid with a surfboard aged 17. ‘Dawn’, his debut album as Ry X, is a sign the search is over. “It’s been a real journey...” begins Ry, whose path to his current home in Los Angeles’ warehouse district has taken in Costa Rica, Indonesia, Stockholm London and Berlin. His trip began in 2009, when the fresh-faced singer – who, fuelled by his love of Pearl Jam, Jeff Buckley and Nirvana had been dabbling in song writing since he was 16 – met a film producer while surfing in Costa Rica. With promises of the rock star dream ringing in his ears, Ry took the producer’s advice and hit Hollywood. He made and released an album, but the dream quickly died. “I didn’t like the record. I was on the wrong side of the canyon. I thought ‘This is not who I am, I don’t actually enjoy this’,” Ry says. Suddenly he was back in the water “I didn’t think I would continue making music, I was really perturbed,” he says. Chewed up and spat out by pop music’s machine, Ry’s spirit had been damaged and he was desperate to repair it. Gnarled by Indonesia, Ry gradually returned to making music, only this time with zero industry influence. He reckons he’d be “a super renegade gypsy surfing the world” if it weren’t for music, and he applied that mindset to his art. Time spent in Europe led him to explore the concrete hues of techno, which resulted firstly in ‘Howling’, a 2012 collaboration with Frank Wiedemann of German electronic duo Ame, and then The Acid, a minimal project with UK DJ Adam Freedland and Californian producer Steve Nalepa. When he wasn’t sweating in warehouse clubs in the small hours, Ry conceived Ry X and wrote fragile songs built on acoustic guitar, piano and his searching, vocal. Recording to tape and enjoying the hiss it left on his demos, he made the ‘Berlin’ EP in 2013. Its release – initially via Swedish label Dumont Dumont and subsequently on Infectious in the UK – would change everything. A two-minute tearjerker twisted around wispy guitar and his cracked vocal, the title-track drifted out of his insular bubble and onto mainstream radio. Somehow, a song recorded in a shack found itself nestled next to Rihanna on radio playlists. A track that doesn’t even have a proper chorus has now amassed nearly four million YouTube plays. “It’s an anti-single,” Ry sums up matter-of-factly, “There’s something beautiful about a song like that being on the radio – it’s like a breath [of air]. It hurts my heart to hear it and I couldn’t record it like that again. There’s magic there.” To stand any chance of getting anywhere near conjuring something similar for the self-produced ‘Dawn’, Ry had to reconnect with his wild side once again. Recreating the dark, Burial-style atmospheres of The Acid’s 2014 album ‘Liminal’ on tour and pin balling between the city and the sea in attempt to satisfy his cravings for both had taken its toll. His usual quick fixes – yoga and surfing – weren’t going to cut it, so he retreated to Topanga Canyon in the hills above Los Angeles. “Ry X is really honest, it’s so much about what feels right,” he explains, “The EP’s success was an accident, so I had to get back to that space of all heart no mind. There's an expectation now, but the music has always led and as soon as you step away from that you're fucked. I had to make sure each song was a beautiful thing.” Even with overwhelming views, a natural stream to swim in and close proximity to the sea, Ry found that process tough. Working throughout 2015, he recorded 40 tracks before he felt ‘Dawn’ reached its pure state. But the real key to finding ‘Dawn’s’ sound – which, with the shattering climax of tracks like ‘Beacon’ to the teary likes of ‘Hold Me Love,’ – was isolation. “I was hibernating. I thought I’d use all these orchestral arrangements but I was just there next to a fire up in the clouds with an acoustic guitar. I wanted to make it about feeling.” Although composed in a dense “Patti Smith style, with a lot of definition in a single line”, the record’s lyrics are drawn from that same directness. All but one of its 12 tracks have one-word titles and they’re forcefully evocative: ‘Sweat’, ‘Haste’, ‘Dawn’, ‘Salt’. The minimal arrangements (composed at LA’s Pulse studios with collaborator Jens Kuross) only enhance the songs’ emotional pull, Ry X is unspooling as much of himself as possible. “The meaning may not be explicit sometimes, but that’s because these are whole experiences wrapped into a few words,” he says. “’Sweat’ is about the ghosts of past relationships and choosing between loves... you’re sweating in that situation, just as when you run or hit a boxing bag. That’s emotional sweat.” Recorded live with only Ry and his guitar, every song on ‘Dawn’ has a threadbare power – the arrangements are stripped back so there’s nothing separating the listener from the songs’ content. “These are live takes, sitting there like Neil Young or Nick Drake used to. It’s about holding tension – any fuck ups got left on so if I’m mumbling that’s how I delivered the vocal in an honest way. You’re really getting the feeling of someone sitting in a room playing the song.” And that’s the precise feeling Ry felt was unreachable when he washed up in Indonesia. But after nearly six years of searching he’s found it, and says ‘Dawn’ represents the start of everything he wished for first time round. “It’s about continuously making records, look at Bjork, Nils Frahm, Nick Cave or Radiohead, they’ve had success but they’ve found a way to create art and freedom.” How will he do it? By relying on an entirely different kind of nudity to the one he grew up with: “I’m just being honest. I want to bare my heart and get naked for people…”
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Première écoute : « Deliverance » de RY X [Translation] | Paperblog | April 2016

Première écoute : « Deliverance » de RY X [Translation] | Paperblog | April 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it

We already thought that RY X had managed to get the most beautiful song of 2014 with "Sweat." And now comes the album ... Dawn , and "Deliverance", a new extract of a violent melancholic intensity. "Deliverance" is a nebulous piano and some dishes electro bass and syncopated rhythmic percussions, which mingle with trippy harmonies voice of the artist. It's so simple, yet so beautiful and so powerful ... We fear not recover from the album, due on May 6 ( Infectious Records / Pias ).

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RY X returns with “Deliverance” | Music and other drugs | 8 April 2016

RY X returns with “Deliverance” | Music and other drugs | 8 April 2016 | RY X | Scoop.it

RY X caught our attention a month ago with his stunning track “Only” and now he has returned and blessed us with his new song “Deliverance”. We are delivered and sent to the skies above with this new track. The track starts off slow and cool and turns into an slow electronic groove that instantly puts you into a trance. His voice is one of the smoothest voices out in the industry right now and he brings so much soul and clarity to his sound that is truly incredible. Check out hist latest below.

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