RRU450TestFile1
130 views | +0 today
Follow
RRU450TestFile1
A test for my RRU450 Communications course.
Curated by Les Wiseman
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Chapter 1: I Will Escort You to the Dark Place

Chapter 1: I Will Escort You to the Dark Place | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it

 

This image appeared in my e-mail box, yesterday. It is a dog by the side of a road. It is foggy and looks to be out in the woods somewhere. Its only caption was: "I will escort you to the dark place."

 

Where is that dark place? Does it mean death? Was this message specifically meant for me?

 

*  *  *  

 

Last night, I woke at 4 a.m. I don't know why. I pulled back the curtain to see what the weather was like. As I watched, a black dog walked into the circle of light under the light standard across the street. It stopped walking and sat. Just like the dog in the picture. It was staring at me, at my face in the window.

 

 -- 30 --

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Classic Simon & Kirby Science Fiction - GeekDad (blog)

Classic Simon & Kirby Science Fiction - GeekDad (blog) | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it
Classic Simon & Kirby Science Fiction
GeekDad (blog)
It's no big surprise that I'm a huge fan of pulp science fiction. I love the rayguns, the rockets, the aliens, and all the other tacky (but not at the time!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Want to Learn How to Think ? Read Fiction - Pacific Standard

Want to Learn How to Think ? Read Fiction - Pacific Standard | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it
Want to Learn How to Think ? Read Fiction Pacific Standard The fictional stories were by authors including Wallace Stegner, Jean Stafford, and Paul Bowles; the non-fiction essays were by equally illustrious writers such as George Bernard Shaw and...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Chapter 4: Lost, but not alone

Chapter 4: Lost, but not alone | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it

I slipped and stumbled, catching site of the dog only occasionally. I figured I must have walked half a mile by now.

 

What in heaven's name was I doing? Dawn was breaking, I'd have to get ready for work in a little more than an hour and I'm trudging through the back-forty on a path that I've never noticed before even though I entered it through an opening across the street from my front door. 

 

Plus, for no good reason, I'm following a black dog that I've only ever seen before in an email that popped into my inbox without a return address.

 

My thoughts stopped dead, though when I saw the figure. Why would someone be standing alone on this path at this time of the morning. Enthusiastic jogger? I thought not. There was a sense of . . . presence . . . with this. . . being.

 

-- 30 --

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Chapter 6: An Encounter

Chapter 6: An Encounter | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it

TK tktk tk.

 

 

-- 30 --

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Chapter 7: Fogbound

Chapter 7: Fogbound | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it

TK Tk tk tk> .

 

 

-- 30 --

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Potpourri #2

Potpourri #2 | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it

Potpourri #2

1) “Affix ass to chair. Do not remove.” — W.P. Kinsella’s best advice on writing.
“Sit.” — Chip Scanlon’s best advice on writing.

2) Kurt Vonnegut: “When you yourself put words on paper, remember that the most damning revelation you can make about yourself is that you do not know what is interesting and what is not.”

3) My colleague at UVic Joan MacLeod recently won the $100,000 Elinore & Lou Siminovitch Prize for Theatre for her body of work of the past 10 years. Here is her candid statement about the craft. “I tell students that you never feel satisfied — that’s the nature of the beast. I remember saying to students that everyone knows the feeling of having a term paper due the next day when you haven’t done anything. You are just overcome with guilt, and I told them that that’s what being a writer feels like every day — it’s a hard job to feel comfortable with, no matter how much you do, or don’t do.”

4) It has always been hard to get published. Even in financial boom times. Breaking in all depends on being in the right place at the right time. Plus, finding yourself prepared at that place and time.

5) For phoners, I recommend an ear button mike that fits in your ear and plugs into a tape recorder. I use a Sony MDR-EJ40. Any store like the Source or Future Shop handles them. They're only a few bucks and work terrifically well.

6) Where you can, structure your quotes as “Quote intro,” attribution, “further quote.” This is the best way to handle quotes and often is a stumbling block for inexperienced writers. It is one of the most important things you can learn.

7) Don’t end a paragraph with a question that you answer in the opening of the next paragraph. Keep discrete ideas together — in sentences and paragraphs.

8) I have never been blocked as a writer as I long ago adopted Gay Talese’s attitude. “I am always blocked. Every word is like pulling teeth.”

9) Simple CP Style and Other Reminders

• Use the full word for a street, avenue, etc, (e.g. Bank Street) if you mean the street itself, but abbreviate it for a specific address on that street (e.g. 318 Bank St.).

• When you specify a province or other detail after a place name , abbreviate it properly (see CP lists) and put it within commas: ...in Whistler, B.C., you can... It’s the same when you give years after dates: …on Nov. 11, 1918, in…

Numbers: p. 201 Caps & Sp

• In two minutes, we will see 100 people arrive.
• use figures — not words — when the number under 10 is tied directly to a symbol (e.g., %, C) or a decimal point.
= $2 or two dollars, never 2 dollars
• 5 C or five degrees but never 5 degrees
• 3% or three per cent but never 3 per cent
• Six percentage points but 6.5 percentage points

Prefer figures to words for number below 10 when established by convention:

5-4 ruling, 6-2 odds, quake magnitude of 7.2, Grade 6, Highway 61, 5 p.m., Act 2, page 3, Chapter 8, Type 2 diabetes, 3-D, V-8, 8-mm, 9-mm pistol, channel 6, 8-ball, Radio 2, 2 GB, 9/11.

10) The term deadline came from the Civil War. When the Union was beating the Confederacy, more prisoners were taken than there were prisons or camps for. Thus, the captured were given an area in a field and a guard would draw a circle around the group. This was called the deadline. You were free to step beyond it, but you would be shot immediately. A similar fate can befall journalists who choose to go beyond the deadline.

11) In this article, we collect some grownup advice on writing from Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known to children and adults as Dr. Seuss.
It has often been said
there's so much to be read,
you never can cram
all those words in your head.

So the writer who breeds
more words than he needs
is making a chore
for the reader who reads.

That's why my belief is
the briefer the brief is,
the greater the sigh
of the reader's relief is.
Known to readers everywhere as Dr. Seuss, Geisel hadn't always been a writer of children's stories. Early in his career he published satirical articles, wrote advertising copy, and drew political cartoons. But even after gaining fame with books about Horton, the Grinch, and other comic characters, he kept his older readers in mind as well. Oh, the Places You'll Go! (1990) may have a reading level of ages four to eight, but it's most popular as a graduation gift for high school and college students.
Geisel's thoughts on writing may also be more appropriate for grownups than for kids. After all, the key to good writing, he once said, is "meticulosity"--a peculiarly Seussian quality that takes years to learn.
Winnow Out and Write Tight!
You can fool an adult into thinking he's reading profundities by sprinkling your prose with purple passages. But with a kid you can't get away with that. Two sentences in a children's book is the equivalent of two chapters in an adult book.

For a 60-page book I'll probably write 500 pages. I think that's why it works. I winnow out.
(quoted in "Dr. Seuss's Green-Eggs-and-Ham World," by Judith Frutig, The Christian Science Monitor, May 12, 1978)
Keep It Alive!
We throw in as many fresh words as we can get away with. Simple, short sentences don't always work. You have to do tricks with pacing, alternate long sentences with short, to keep it alive and vital. Virtually every page is a cliff-hanger--you've got to force them to turn it.
(quoted in A Writer Teaches Writing, by Donald Murray, Houghton Mifflin, 1984)
Learn by Yourself!
You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room.
("On Becoming a Writer," The New York Times, May 21, 1986)
Exaggerate! --not such a good idea in journalism --L.Wiseman
I tend to basically exaggerate in life, and in writing, it's fine to exaggerate. I really enjoy overstating for the purpose of getting a laugh. It's very flattering, that laugh, and at the same time it gives pleasure to the audience and accomplishes more than writing very serious things. For another thing, writing is easier than digging ditches. Well, actually that's an exaggeration. It isn't.
(interview in the Los Angeles Times Book Review, 1976)

12) • Legal on Minors:
Don’t use name, if the kid has committed a crime, or is victim of a sexual crime.
Sun crime reporter Neal Hall: “Reporters have to get the verbal permission of the parents or legal guardian of a juvenile victim or even a witness to a crime.
So it helps to talk to the parents first, to get their okay.
if they appear at a police news conference, however, you can assume the kid's parents have approved.”

13) Humorous grammar rules:
1. Don't use no double negatives.
2. Make each pronoun agree with their antecedents.
3. About them sentence fragments.
4. When dangling, watch your participles.
5. Verbs has got to agree with their subjects.
6. Don't write run-on sentences they are hard to read.
7. Don't use commas, which aren't necessary.
8. Try to not ever split infinitives.
9. Its important to use your apostrophe's correctly.
10. Proofread your writing to see if you any words out.
11. Correct speling is essential.
12. Eschew ostentatious erudition.
13. Avoid cliches like the plague.

-- 30 --

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Vancouver Writing Jobs

Writing and Writing-Related Jobs in Vancouver and British Columbia (RT @heidi_turner Vancouver writing jobs, Feb. 16, 2012.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Here's to Canadian creativity and hashtags - BissettMatheson Communications

Here's to Canadian creativity and hashtags - BissettMatheson Communications | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it
Strategic Communications Planning, crisis management crisis communication media relations public relations, advocacy campaigns, speech writing, media training, communications training, focus group research, dealing with the media, reporter interviews,...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Video conferencing essential to disaster recovery communications

Video conferencing essential to disaster recovery communications | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it
Video conferencing and telepresence have become essential elements for a disaster recovery communications plan for both government agencies and enterprises. How can you enhance your disaster recovery response?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Les Wiseman from Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
Scoop.it!

16 of the Dumbest Content Marketing Mistakes We're Still Making

16 of the Dumbest Content Marketing Mistakes We're Still Making | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it

Content marketing mistakes are not always readily apparent. With vanity metrics and anecdotal stories, we can fool ourselves into believing that our content marketing efforts are successful even when they’re not serving the business.


In both the video and the article below, what follows are some of the most common and repeated content marketing mistakes made by respected business professionals. They fessed up to their mistake, explained what they did to fix it, and at the end I offer up some advice on how to avoid this mistake so that you’re always serving the business....


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, June 5, 2017 11:09 AM

We still make a lot of content marketing mistakes that result in extra unnecessary work or they simply don't serve the business.

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, June 5, 2017 2:05 PM

We still make a lot of content marketing mistakes that result in extra unnecessary work or they simply don't serve the business.

Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Design Fiction: GoogleX moonshots - Wired

Design Fiction: GoogleX moonshots - Wired | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it
Design Fiction: GoogleX moonshots
Wired
Design Fiction: GoogleX moonshots. By Bruce SterlingEmail Author; June 12, 2013 |; 6:36 am |; Categories: Design Fiction · Edit.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Chapter 2: Come follow

Chapter 2: Come follow | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it

I peered at the dog. I would swear it was looking directly in my eyes. I pulled on some jeans, socks, a flannel shirt and some slip-ons. I went down the stairs to my front door and stepped outside. I didn't lock the door behind me.

 

The dog saw me and inclined its head, as if urging me to follow. Then it turned and trotted into the fog.

 

I went after it, a path I hadn't noticed before. The dog was making a good pace and it stopped and looked back at me, making sure I was keeping up. It seemed to be indicating, "Come follow." But to where?

 

-- 30 --

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Chapter 3: Into the Mystic

Chapter 3: Into the Mystic | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it

As if in a dream, I felt compelled to follow. Occasionally, flashes of the rising dawn light would penetrate through the trees, though a dense fog held to the ground. 

 

I stumbled on, the slick soles of my slip-ons making traction on the decaying leaves hard to attain. I would watch where I was putting my feet and look up and the dog would be gone. I'd wonder where I was going. I'd think about turning back, remembering that my house was unlocked. Then the dog would appear through the mist and just as quickly turn and plunge on guiding me. To what I did not know.

 

-- 30 --

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Chapter 5: Who

Chapter 5: Who | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it

TK tk tk tk.

 

 

-- 30 --

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Chapter 8: A Rescue

Chapter 8: A Rescue | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it

The car appeared like a wraith from the fog and braked to a shuddering halt. "Get in," said the dog. "We don't have much time . . . ."

 

 

-- 30 --

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Just a space for design

Just a space for design.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

Sometimes The Journalism Is Just Too Big | Media Matters for America

Sometimes The Journalism Is Just Too Big | Media Matters for America | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it
Breitbart, master of deception.Sometimes The Journalism Is Just Too Big | Media Matters for America http://t.co/cZpuw6U6 via @addthis #ows...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Les Wiseman
Scoop.it!

6 things we learned about journalism from Social Media Week | Poynter.

6 things we learned about journalism from Social Media Week | Poynter. | RRU450TestFile1 | Scoop.it
Standing for journalism, strengthening democracy | Journalism training, media news & how to's (6 things learned at social media week, incl.)...
more...
No comment yet.