Change Leading:  Why Gen Y Could Believe In Your Cause And Your Company | RPorten | Scoop.it

"Gen Y notoriously rallies for movements and startups they love.  How can you  reach out Gen Y to lead change in your company?"

This post does a remarkable job of turning conventions around, like parents teaching their children.  Who hasn't learned from their own kids about how to use social media better, as one example?  How can we listen into generations to help change happen & stick?

 

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To those who say we're the lazy generation, the entitled generation, the arrogant generation, you're right. We're “lazy” because we work smarter. - Yael Cohen, The 100 Most Creative People In Business

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Excerpts:

 

Here's how to recruit Gen Y to your side:


1. Define your space: Build for a specific demographic and build remarkably for them.  Be proud of what you do, and it'll show.


2. Be completely authentic: Our generation knows how to find a fraudulent needle in a digital haystack, so stay true to your space and the audience you intend to serve.


3. Ask for action: Ask! If your campaign, movement, or organization doesn't have a call to action, how can you expect a response? Impressions are wasted without a call to action. Even if it's a simple "Read More" or "Go Here," you need to have a goal with every interaction.


To those who say we're the lazy generation, the entitled generation, the arrogant generation, you're right. We're “lazy” because we work smarter.

 

We're the arrogant "kids" who will change the world for the better, who will start fixing the world instead of just breaking it, who will streamline banalities, and who will exploit joy.

 

 

Source:  Yael Cohen, The 100 Most Creative People In Business

 

Yael founded Fuck Cancer in 2009 after her mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. Determined to make a real impact within the cancer space, she created an organization that activates Generation Y to engage with their parents about early detection, and teaches supporters how to look for cancer instead of just find it.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN