Roles, Rights & Responsibilities in the Classroom and at Home
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Roles, Rights & Responsibilities in the Classroom and at Home
A teachers resource blog from the perspective of a pre-service teacher studying at Sydney University. Aimed at ES1 (Kindergarten) this blog is focused on the HSIE outcome: Roles, rights and responsibilities in the classroom and at home.
Curated by Crystal Isaac
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School Charter: Rights and Responsibilities | UNICEF Australia

School Charter: Rights and Responsibilities | UNICEF Australia | Roles, Rights & Responsibilities in the Classroom and at Home | Scoop.it
Teach your class about children's rights and the responsibility we all have in helping realise these rights
Crystal Isaac's insight:

These posters available on the UNICEF Australia website, are a great resource for both teachers and parents. It describes the rights and responsibilities all children must have in both the school and home environment. The poster draws on aspects of the UN Convention of the Rights of a Child and annotates the article number under each quote provided. UNICEF Australia has made these posters easily accessable from their website and can be downloaded free of charge, to be displayed in classrooms and even in a child's room. This is a great permanent fixture in a classroom, that can act as a constant reminder to children of their roles, rights and responsibilities, while creating a 'dynamic environment to simulate content knowledge' (Mishra & Koehler, 2006).

From a Kindergarten perspective, i would use this resource as a lead up into a homework or assessment task for students, to get them thinking about responsibilities at home and in the classroom. For their activity, after going through these posters with student's, i would have them either choose one of the points of responsibilities listed or make their own, and create a poster that displays their choice. For example: If they chose 'the responsibility to respect all cultures', the student may create a 'harmony' type poster, with students of various cultures and religions playing together at school. These posters could then be used to compare (appreciate - creative arts syllabus) students thoughts and then displayed around the class or even school, along with the UNICEF posters.

This assessment activity can not only explore students knowledge of the content, but also links in with creative arts and literacy KLA's through their formation of the poster. It also draws on the "value and importance of formative rather than summative assessment" (Moore, 2002, p.30) to assess student learning and effectiveness of teaching strategies and resources. Teachers can also use this to assess students comprehension of their roles, rights and responsibilities and get an idea of what to address for future learning.

Reference:
Moore, A. (2002). Teaching and Learning: Pedagogy, Curriculum and Culture. New York: RoutledgeFalmer

 

Mishra, P., Koehler, M. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College, 108(6), pp. 1017–1054. Retrieved from:https://elearning.sydney.edu.au/bbcswebdav/pid-1803068-dt-content-rid10383028_1/courses/2013_Semester_1_EDUP3002/Mishra%20%26%20Koehler_TPCK.pdf
 

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Learning about Aboriginal Roles

Learning about Aboriginal Roles | Roles, Rights & Responsibilities in the Classroom and at Home | Scoop.it
Crystal Isaac's insight:

This lesson plan from the Department of Education in Western Australia provides a link to an Aboriginal perspective within the roles, rights and responsibilities outcomes. It provides two various lessons for teachers to cover in the early stages, about Aborigine role models and their importance in what they do.

I found this a particularly good resource for teachers, as it provides a link between KLA's such as English, HSIE, Creative Arts and PDHPE. It allows teachers to creatively provide analogies and real examples (within the Aboriginal community) of Leaders and Role Models and their own expectations in their professions.

 

Mishra and Koehler (2006, p.1020) state knowledge systems that are fundamental to teaching include a knowledge of student thinking and learning, and knowledge of subject matter.This resource is a great chance for teachers to integrate students prior knowledge of Aboriginal communities, with pictures and interactive class discussions on  the importance of role models while providing cultural awareness. If possible even organising an Aboriginal Elder or key figure to come in an talk to the students about their roles in the community!


This activity can also lead to a follow-up activity on students creating a portrait of themselves and writing their roles and responsibilities in the classroom as a student and as a member of society in their daily lives. For example: To not litter, to always follow the teacher, to be kind to others; therefore linking to Creative Arts KLA's. 

This series of lessons not only exposes students to various role models and figures in their own lives and the Aboriginal community, but also gives them a chance to self-reflect and demonstrate their awareness of their own rights/responsibilities and that of others.

Teachers are able to use this lesson plan as is, or altered to fit into the NSW Curriculum, with appropriate links to various KLA's, as named above, to provide students with an engaging and stimulating pedagogical learning experience. 

 

Reference:

Mishra, P., Koehler, M. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College, 108(6), pp. 1017–1054. Retrieved from:https://elearning.sydney.edu.au/bbcswebdav/pid-1803068-dt-content-rid-10383028_1/courses/2013_Semester_1_EDUP3002/Mishra%20%26%20Koehler_TPCK.pdf

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Kindergarten--Classroom Management

Kindergarten--Classroom Management | Roles, Rights & Responsibilities in the Classroom and at Home | Scoop.it

Pinterest, an online pinboard to collect and share what inspires you.

Crystal Isaac's insight:

This is a pin interest blog I found which highlights management techniques across the globe when dealing with Early Stage 1. It shows various resources that teachers have found useful when dealing with roles and responsibilities in kindergarten.

 

Through the site I have found great examples of student responsibilities in the classroom such as making smart choices, using inside voices and behaviour and rewards charts. Alex Moore (2002,p.4) descibes Skinner's 'law of positive reinforcement' and how the receipt of tangile rewards may encourage repeated behavioural patterns to effectively train students. These colourful displays, ideas for rewards and available print outs provided, make it a useful resource for teachers looking at implementing and displaying management strategies around the classroom.


Displaying any of the resources this site offers as a teacher, will also give students a constant reminder of the rules and expectations of them in the classroom. Such as the picture captioned, which is a handy technique a teacher added, showing 'reward balls' students are able to pick out of the jar once they have done something good in the class'.

 

It is also a handy resource that provides teachers a chance to view perspectives across the globe, with links to websites in which teachers can see how they were implemented and if/how they were useful. This site is also a perfect example of PCK and what occurs when "...the teacher interprets the subject matter and finds different ways to represent it and make it accessible to learners" (Mishra & Koehler, 2006, p.1021). Although all teachers are accessing the same site and resources, they are blending the content and pedagogical knowledge to interpret and implement it in various ways.

 

Pre-service teachers, like myself, could also find this site a particularly good resource when entering classrooms for the first time, as a 'simplistic approach towards development of pedagogy' (Mishra & Koehler, 2006, p.1045). It also not only provides cheap and practical resources, but also ideas for implementation to allow students to feel included in the process. Teachers are able to interactively have the class participate in creating and utilising management techniques, further linking to literacy outcomes as students must use their own semantic knowledge and regulating processes to create a management technique that is inventive and that they all agree to adhere to!

 

 

Reference:

Mishra, P., Koehler, M. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College, 108(6), pp. 1017–1054. Retrieved from:https://elearning.sydney.edu.au/bbcswebdav/pid-1803068-dt-content-rid-10383028_1/courses/2013_Semester_1_EDUP3002/Mishra%20%26%20Koehler_TPCK.pdf

 

Moore, A. (2002). Teaching and Learning: Pedagogy, Curriculum and Culture. New York: RoutledgeFalmer

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Exploring the Rights of Children

Exploring the Rights of Children | Roles, Rights & Responsibilities in the Classroom and at Home | Scoop.it

World Vision Australia

 

 

Crystal Isaac's insight:

World Vision provides a variety of school resources (lesson plan, posters etc) for teachers that include links to various KLA’s. The site provides a search that allows teachers to browse through regions, topics, year levels, curriculum areas and even resource types to look through and narrow down their search. This allows teachers to explore the TPCK framework (Michra and Koehler, 2006), by involving themselves in exploring technological resources (like this website), to create pedagogical content driven lesson plans. 

 

In particular, the lesson plan I scooped related to exploring the rights of children, which can be used to link in with aspects of HSIE – roles, rights and responsibilities (SSES1) outcomes, while also tying into other HSIE and Literacy and Numeracy syllabus components.  

  

From this lesson, students are able to learn about the various rights that apply not only to them, but to children everywhere. The video, worksheets and other resources provided allow students to be engaged in their learning, and address pedagogical content knowledge through modern resources (Mishra & Koehler, 2006). Students explore literacy components through the development of their evaluation and comparison skills, as the activity scaffolds them to use their higher order thinking and thought processes in both the interactive and written sections. They are also able to apply numeracy knowledge of 'sorting' and 'greater than' and 'less than' through this ranking idea.

 

As a follow up activity for another day, I would also have students continue this lesson by creating a list of what they believe their rights are in their own lives at home and at school. Students can do this as a class, and again order it into most importance, and see how the chart differs to the initial African chart. This gives students  a chance to apply their knowledge gained to evaluate their own lifestyle opportunities and needs/wants at home and in school.

 

Mishra & Koehler (2006) state how "Technologies often come with their own imperatives that constrain the content that has to be covered and the nature of possible representations" (p.1025).However, this school resource site provided by World Vision, is an easy to navigate and access site for teachers to gain some interesting and interactive resources and lesson ideas.

 

Reference:

Mishra, P., Koehler, M. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College, 108(6), pp. 1017–1054. Retrieved from:https://elearning.sydney.edu.au/bbcswebdav/pid-1803068-dt-content-rid10383028_1/courses/2013_Semester_1_EDUP3002/Mishra%20%26%20Koehler_TPCK.pdf

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Daily Routines in Kindergarten Classes

A Day in the Life of a Kindergartener!

Crystal Isaac's insight:

This is a clip i found on Youtube which documents a class at Syracuse Academy's daily activities. It also provides teachers with a useful example of a TPCK approach to teaching strategies, showing an integration of technology, content and pedagogical knowledge (Mishra & Koehler, 2009, p.1039). I think this is a good insight into the rules and expectations that need to be integrated into Kindergarten classes from early  terms, to ensure routine throughout the school year.

In the video, children from the classroom show the viewers around different aspects of their class setting and what is expected of them from when they get in in the morning, to when their in classes during the day. It portrays various aspects of roles, rights and responsibilities in the classroom and at home, as students need to regulate and take control of their own learning and management.

Other roles, rights and responsibilities can be seen in the decorations throughout the classroom, including behaviour management strategies and day of the week calendars. Site words, literacy work and rules of the classroom and school are also all displayed through the class, so students have the visual reminder of what is needed as they enter the classroom environment.

This Youtube clip is a perfect example for teachers who need to set-up boundaries and routines for students in Kindergarten. Mishra and Koehler state that "The advent of digital technology has dramatically changed routines and practices..." (2006, p.1017), but this could also be to our benefit in this case, as it also allows us to gain insight and view these changes, in the form of YouTube.

Although some may think this is too rigid, early stage students need this type of structure in the classroom to get them used to the school setting. I believe this is a strong and useful resource for teachers (especially preservice teachers) who may be looking at introducing this type of structure into their kindergarten class.

 

I believe this is a perfect blend of independance and routine for the students in this class, all while emphasising this fact by introducing students to technological aspects and reinforcing the routine by having the students dictate their own experiences!


Reference:

Mishra, P., Koehler, M. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College, 108(6), pp. 1017–1054. Retrieved from: https://elearning.sydney.edu.au/bbcswebdav/pid-1803068-dt-content-rid-10383028_1/courses/2013_Semester_1_EDUP3002/Mishra%20%26%20Koehler_TPCK.pdf


 

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