Role of wireless communication in medicine
44 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan
Scoop.it!

A Little Known Herbal Secret For Anxiety No One Is Talking About - Expanded Consciousness

In the hustle and bustle of modern life, most of us are in a state of over-thinking, over working and over-everything.  For many of us, this causes us to suffer from anxiety whether in a small amounts or potentially large amounts. It could be money, work, school, having children the list goes on and on! Traumas, Read More
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan
Scoop.it!

Seven Spiritual Needs | Taking Charge of Your Health & Wellbeing

Seven Spiritual Needs | Taking Charge of Your Health & Wellbeing | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
Seven Spiritual Needs


Based on more than 30 years of psychological counseling and pastoral care, Howard Clinebell believed that humans have seven spiritual hungers in common. As you read through them, consider whether you recognize any of these spiritual needs in yourself. Are there particular areas of “spiritual hunger” in your life that need more attention than others?

Specifically, Clinebell felt that human beings long to:

Experience the healing and empowerment of love—from others, self, and an ultimate source.
Experience renewing times of transcendence—expansive moments beyond the immediate sensory spheres.
Have vital beliefs that lend meaning and hope in the midst of losses, tragedies, and failures.
Have values, priorities, and life commitments centered in issues of justice, integrity, and love to provide guidance in personally and socially responsible living.
Discover and develop inner wisdom, creativity, and love of self.
Develop a deepening awareness of oneness with other people, the natural world, and all living things.
Have spiritual resources to help heal grief, guilt, resentment, unforgiveness, self-rejection, and shame and deepen experiences of trust, self-esteem, hope, joy and love of life.
Jeyakumar Natarajan's insight:

One of my all time  favorite thoughts by Howard Clinebell 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

As Patients Turn to Web Communities, Physicians Must Take Notice

As Patients Turn to Web Communities, Physicians Must Take Notice | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it

Approximately 1.1 billion people have Facebook accounts, and the number of social media sites and users just keeps growing. Whether this trend forges relationships or increases isolation is an ongoing debate, but in the realm of medicine, social media that goes beyond the Yelp-like physician rating sites might enhance the patient experience and benefit physicians and their institutions as well, according to a group of experts who recently addressed the topic at a panel for gastroenterologists.

“As physicians, we can no longer ignore [social media]; we have to understand how patients are wanting to connect with us,” said M. Bridget Duffy, MD, chief medical officer at Vocera Communications, an information technology company that develops mobile communication devices and services for use in health care and other industries.

Dr. Duffy moderated a session on the emergence of social media in medicine at the 2014 GI Roundtable, a conference dedicated to exploring challenges and their solutions for gastroenterology and the field’s future.

“Historically, we’ve focused on the intervention, but patients want us to connect with them before they arrive at the clinic or hospital. They want us to understand their preferences; they want a personalized plan and a path to their well-being; and they want a connectivity after they leave,” said Dr. Duffy, who has spent the past 20 years researching ways to improve the patient, staff and physician experience.

Dr. Duffy leads the Experience Innovation Network, a group of health care organizations committed to accelerating innovation on patient and staff experience. In addition, Vocera partners with Rock Health, a start-up incubator in San Francisco that mentors and supports medical tech companies dedicated to that goal. Dr. Duffy and her team participate in this mentoring and support, and help connect the companies to providers to test and adopt their novel products and services.

“We need to find technologies and process improvements that create consistent, seamless experiences of care, and that empower and engage patients to be partners in their care,” she added.

Cancer Connect—A Platform for Patients

Social media, by definition, refers to the virtual communities and networks in which people generate, distribute and discuss information. Charles Weaver, MD, an oncologist and founder of Cancer Connect—a popular cancer information website—predicts this is how patients will interact with each other from now on. “The question for all of us is how do we become a part of it? How do we participate, and how do we use it to everyone’s best advantage?”

A pioneer of Internet-based patient education, Dr. Weaver got the idea to add a social media component to Cancer Connect after his elder son developed a rare sarcoma. Treatment required a long commute from their remote home in Sun Valley, Idaho, to the University of Utah Hospital. “I got to experience the fear, anxiety, confusion and isolation that any parent or patient experiences when they’re diagnosed with a significant illness,” Dr. Weaver said.

Fast forward several years, and Dr. Weaver found his sons engaged on Facebook one afternoon when they should have been doing homework. He was on the verge of scolding them when the younger one said, “‘Think if there was a Facebook just for cancer patients. Wouldn’t it be neat if they could connect with each other? They wouldn’t have to go through what [my brother] went through in a small town,’” Dr. Weaver recalled.

His older son chimed in, “That would have been really helpful.” He had, in fact, already been using Facebook to locate and connect with other kids who had cancer.

The next day, Dr. Weaver called his programmers to discuss creating a Facebook-type of application just for cancer patients. Now, a little more than two years after Cancer Connect added its social media component, 52,000 people have registered to participate. Some 9,000 patients visit the physician-moderated virtual communities every month.

Users “are looking for validation of what their physician told them, for translations of what their physician said, and for support from others who have gone through their experience,” Dr. Weaver said. They “also told us that it was very important for them to give back. In fact, the patients we surveyed rated that as the most important aspect.”

Private-Label Communities

Cancer Connect’s social media platform is free and open to any patient who wants to join, but it also is used by practices as a virtual home base for their patients. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center are just a few of the institutions that use Cancer Connect to supplement supportive care of their patients and patients’ families.

For such centers and practices, creating private-label communities has several advantages. On a practice’s website, Cancer Connect is part of the patients’ experience as it relates to that particular institution, an approach that may improve patient retention, increase patient referrals and enhance patient satisfaction, Dr. Weaver said.

The model works fairly simply. For example, from Dana-Farber’s home page, a click on “My Dana-Farber” brings the visitor to an invitation to join their online cancer community. “It explains the rules of the community and how you participate in it. From that point on, the patient never leaves the experience of your brand and what you’re providing,” Dr. Weaver said.

Once a patient becomes part of Dana-Farber’s online community, he or she can participate in both local and national conversations. They can choose to interact only with Dana-Farber patients, with patients from other centers using Cancer Connect, or both.

“The beauty of this is that for [cancers] that are common, you can build a community on your own website because you’ll have enough patients to benefit from the experience,” Dr. Weaver said. “With rare conditions, even a place like Dana-Farber won’t have a critical mass of patients who can support each other, but by sharing the community with other large centers, you aggregate patients so they can get the support they need.”

This need, of course, varies from one patient to another. Some visit Cancer Connect communities looking for an answer to a specific question or problem, whereas others desire a stronger connection.

“The ones who want a deeper relationship tend to find others who are also looking for a deeper level,” Dr. Weaver said. “People initially join up because they want support and information. Those who stay want to share information and provide support, to give back,” he noted.

GI Connection, a New Kid on the Block

When Klaus Mergener, MD, PhD, MBA, of Digestive Health Specialists in Tacoma, Wash., learned about Cancer Connect and its offshoot, The RA Connection, for people with rheumatoid arthritis, he quickly envisioned the utility of the concept for gastroenterology.

“We have a huge number of chronic diseases,” Dr. Mergener said, from irritable bowel syndrome to cirrhosis. “If we can get a few hundred [GI] patients to start talking and connecting about their illnesses, I think that might be very useful.”

He proposed the idea of a GI-specific platform to Dr. Weaver, and the two worked together to develop GI Connection, which is scheduled to go live this summer. “GI and cancer have a couple of things in common,” Dr. Weaver said. “The most important is that both specialties deal with chronic conditions, and people with chronic conditions want to stay connected.

“Also, they are both subspecialties that get their patients from someplace else—you’re typically not diagnosed with cancer by an oncologist,” Dr. Weaver continued. “This gives the subspecialties an opportunity to create communities to aggregate around the experience at their center.”

Aside from patients with chronic GI diseases, those worried about an upcoming procedure might take comfort in the support of others, too. “Connecting with someone who has had a colonoscopy or multiple colonoscopies and can tell you that it’s OK is very powerful,” Dr. Weaver said. “Sorry to say, but patients put a lot more value on one-to-one interactions with other patients than with health care providers.”

Before the launch of GI Connection, Dr. Mergener began raising awareness among practices that he hopes will be early adopters, mentioning the site to patients and increasing visibility with business cards and scannable QR codes. “Charles [Weaver] tells me that once you get up to 100 or 200 patients, involvement snowballs by word of mouth,” he said.

Crohnology

As Sean Ahrens took the podium at the GI Roundtable to discuss Crohnology, the platform that he developed to capture the experiences of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), he acknowledged that physicians are his toughest audience.

“Partly, I think that’s because there is a wave, a front, of patients connecting back toward each other; the case I want to make to you is toward [the acquisition of] medical knowledge,” Mr. Ahrens said. “We are moving from the era of traditional media, where people are receiving information, to one in which they are contributing to the knowledge source.”

Mr. Ahrens was 12 years old when he experienced the onset of Crohn’s disease. Now 28, he has gone through a host of different treatments, or as he thinks of them, experiments. “These include physicians prescribing different medications, and me doing things like changing my diet,” he said.

Mr. Ahrens began to develop Crohnology as a college student, but the concept for the site gelled a few years later during one of his more unusual self-experiments. Remicade (Janssen Biotech; infliximab) was no longer controlling his symptoms, but he feared making the leap to Humira (AbbVie; adalimumab). Under the supervision of a physician who thought the novel therapy probably wouldn’t hurt him, Mr. Ahrens started inoculating himself with a pig whipworm solution he’d ordered from a company in Germany.

“During this treatment, it occurred to me that the very least I could do, as a favor to humanity, was leave a paper trail so that others could learn from this experiment,” he said.

It became clear about two-thirds of the way through that the pig whipworm therapy wasn’t working, as Mr. Ahrens’ symptoms remained severe. For the sake of his health, he adopted a specific carbohydrate diet, although he knew that it would compromise the quality of the data. But the experience further supported his theory that patients are vast silos of information, and that there should be a system to capture those experiences and learn from them, instead of dismissing each patient’s experience as anecdotal.

In 2011, Rock Health selected Crohnology as part of its inaugural class of start-ups to nurture. The support solidified development of Crohnology’s website and mobile platform. To date, the network has about 5,500 patient contributors with irritable bowel disease, representing 70 different countries.

As for that physician audience? Reactions have been mixed. “On the whole, physicians like the concept of connecting patients and giving them emotional and social support,” Mr. Ahrens said. “But they’re also generally of the school of thought that medical knowledge needs to be very carefully collected and dispensed inside the physician system, through rigorous clinical trials.”

He views Crohnology as a model that can accrue useful knowledge without the staggering costs of clinical trials.

Catching Up to the Consumer

Ironically, although the increasing presence of technology has been criticized for creating barriers between physicians and patients, in the right hands, social media technology may be a way to start tearing down those walls, Dr. Duffy said.

“I think there is a way that technologies can be humanizing if you pick the right ones,” she said. “That’s what patients are doing through sites like Cancer Connect and Crohnology, using technology to create human connections with others who have conditions like theirs.”

One of her concerns with these technological innovations, however, is that physicians, who historically have been a bit recalcitrant with social media in their profession, are falling behind what their patients want and need.

“Doctors on the delivery side have to figure out how to find those resources that help restore people to a full life versus just a great technical outcome,” Dr. Duffy said. “And we have to move faster to catch up with where consumers are going.”


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Role of wireless communication in medicine
Scoop.it!

Blogging Can Be Good Medicine for Cancer Patients

Blogging Can Be Good Medicine for Cancer Patients | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it

Blogging may be good medicine, according to a new study. A well known Sanford Health oncologist is encouraging her patients to start a journal. 


Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor, Heather Swift, Jeyakumar Natarajan
more...
Eradah Hamad إرادة حمد's curator insight, October 27, 2013 11:51 AM
التدوين كحل علاجي للصحة النفسية لمرضى السرطان
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from ONE HealthCare Worldwide
Scoop.it!

Happy Thanksgiving Friends! You make my life more cheerful !!

Happy Thanksgiving Friends! You make my life more cheerful !! | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
You'll be happier and so will everyone else.

Via ONE HealthCare Worldwide
Jeyakumar Natarajan's insight:

Thank you and I also share the same sentiments

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Digitized Health
Scoop.it!

OSHA Calls for Electronic Reporting of Workplace Injuries, Illnesses

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration wants to require large companies to electronically file and make publically available reports of workplace-related injuries and illnesses.


Via Emmanuel Capitaine
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Will connected Healthcare save the Medical Device industry

Will connected Healthcare save the Medical Device industry | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it

he following infographic takes a look at the medical device industry and healthcare. The average American spends approximately $9,000 per year for medical. The top three fields for conditions are diabetes, obesity, and hypertension.


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

70% of chronic patients in Spain willing to use telemedicine

70% of chronic patients in Spain willing to use telemedicine | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it

Around 70 percent of patients and 80 percent of health professionals in Spain would be willing to use telemedicine if it were available to them, according to a study conducted by Telefonica and 
IESE Business School.

 

Telemedicine or Remote Patient Management (RPM) is a system that allows patients to monitor their health from home and share the results in real time with their doctors. The study is the first of its kind in Spain and reflects the views of nearly 1,800 people, including chronic patients (hypertension, diabetes, heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and medical professionals across Spain (general practitioners, specialists and nurses) in both the public and private sectors.

 

Currently, only 31 percent of doctors know exactly what RPM is, but nearly nine out of 10 professionals feel that RPM can improve the quality of care thanks to early detection of changes in patient conditions and reduction of crowding at hospitals. However, the lack of patient access to technology and lack of technological training is a major concern for 80 percent of health professionals, as is the reduction in personal contact with patients.

 

This lack of contact with physicians is also the main concern of patients, although most would be comfortable using videoconferencing. On average, only 16 percent of patients surveyed said they would refuse to use the system if it were offered.

 

 Original: http://www.telecompaper.com/news/70-of-chronic-patients-willing-to-use-telemedicine-study--976089
Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Innovative Marketing and Crowdfunding
Scoop.it!

Iowa police are using GPS bullets to track runaway cars

Iowa police are using GPS bullets to track runaway cars | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
Police in Iowa are now using a system called StarChase to blast GPS tracker onto the trunks of cars, thereby avoiding high-speed chases.

Via Marty Koenig
more...
Andy Senko CDP's curator insight, October 30, 2013 12:26 PM

Welcome to Gotham...

Richard Platt's curator insight, October 30, 2013 5:30 PM
Now there is a wearable technology that will take you to jail - nice move by the boys in blue in the cornbelt
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners
Scoop.it!

Blogging Can Be Good Medicine for Cancer Patients

Blogging Can Be Good Medicine for Cancer Patients | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it

Blogging may be good medicine, according to a new study. A well known Sanford Health oncologist is encouraging her patients to start a journal. 


Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor, Heather Swift
more...
Eradah Hamad إرادة حمد's curator insight, October 27, 2013 11:51 AM
التدوين كحل علاجي للصحة النفسية لمرضى السرطان
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Trends in Retail Health Clinics and telemedicine
Scoop.it!

Telemedicine – The Next Healthcare Solution healthPERX Offers Convenience & Savings

Telemedicine – The Next Healthcare Solution healthPERX Offers Convenience & Savings | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
Telemedicine – The Next Healthcare Solution healthPERX Offers Convenience & Savings - on PR.com

Via eMedToday
more...
eMedToday's curator insight, October 28, 2013 3:13 AM

“Telemedicine, also called telehealth, should be part of every company’s cost containment strategy,” said Marks. “Companies have saved tens of thousands of dollars using the service with reduced time out, more productive employees and a healthier workplace overall. Furthermore, employees have saved thousands of dollars from their own out-of-pocket expenses.”

Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Life @ Work
Scoop.it!

Why Self-Compassion Helps You Meet Life's Challenges

Why Self-Compassion Helps You Meet Life's Challenges | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it

Do you regularly try to motivate yourself with self-criticism and mental projections about all the bad things that will happen to you if you don’t get it together? While this approach may create that extra surge of adrenaline to meet your work deadline, cold call the next potential client, get to the gym, or get your house cleaned before the in-laws visit, it comes at a cost. You end up feeling bad about yourself a lot of the time. 

 

You get into constant “fight or flight” mode, trying to avoid the negative imagined consequences, which messes with your cortisol and other stress hormones. You get overwhelmed, and decide to zone out playing video games or posting mindlessly on social media, or you rebel and eat, drink, or spend too much, thus creating more self-disgust. If this sounds familiar, perhaps you need a healthy dose of self-compassion.

 

by Melanie Greenberg, Ph.D.


Via Edwin Rutsch, Barbara Kerr, Barb Jemmott
more...
Barbara Kerr's curator insight, October 6, 2013 4:20 PM

Having compassion for yourself is a necessary step not only for your own well-being but also for those you care for..

Glori R Zeltzer, MFT's curator insight, October 18, 2013 1:34 PM

When we show ourselves love, we blossom, just as children and our gardens do.

Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Trends in Retail Health Clinics and telemedicine
Scoop.it!

Telemedicine can help patients from Rwanda to rural America

Telemedicine can help patients from Rwanda to rural America | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
For patients in underserved areas and difficult-to-reach locations, they may have few ways to gain medical help without drastic steps needing to be taken.

Via eMedToday
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan
Scoop.it!

7 Unusual Ways to Deal with Depression - Expanded Consciousness

7 Unusual Ways to Deal with Depression - Expanded Consciousness | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
Discover in this article cool, helpful and unusual ways how to deal with depression. Try these tips and you will see great result.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan
Scoop.it!

From Alaska to Massachusetts, eICU systems making the rounds

From Alaska to Massachusetts, eICU systems making the rounds | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
For hospitals looking to keep constant tabs on the most critical patients--both in-house and at remote rural facilities--electronic intensive care units continue to serve as a viable option.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan
Scoop.it!

Your Smartphone Will Soon Know If You Have Bipolar Disorder - TechCrunch

Your Smartphone Will Soon Know If You Have Bipolar Disorder - TechCrunch | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
TechCrunch
Your Smartphone Will Soon Know If You Have Bipolar Disorder
TechCrunch
In the United States, 1 in 50 people over the age of 25 have some form of bipolar disorder.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Role of wireless communication in medicine
Scoop.it!

7 Tips for Traveling While Pregnant

7 Tips for Traveling While Pregnant | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
Whether you're planning a mind-clearing babymoon, a critical work trip or that four-hour drive to your in-laws, make sure to prioritize your comfort and health while on the go. Here are seven tips for taking a trip when you're expecting.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

World's first real 3D-printed gun fires more than 50 rounds

World's first real 3D-printed gun fires more than 50 rounds | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
In a breakthrough for 3D-printing technology, the world's first working metal gun has been created (http://t.co/SBUz089fcv)

Via TechinBiz
more...
JAMIEWHITTLE's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:20 AM

bad for peoples health if  they get shot by one

 

optionsciencepo's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:34 AM

Pierre Raphael technologie

 

Everett Dalton's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:05 AM

wow that looks like something off men in black..lol

---

Everett Dalton, IBO

http://www.wakeup2mca.com

Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Social Health on line
Scoop.it!

Google Helpouts will bring telehealth to the masses

Google Helpouts will bring telehealth to the masses | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
With Google providing reducing the friction to remotely connect with a provider, Google Helpouts may be the event that brings telehealth to the masses.

 

Google Answers closed in 2006, but recently, version 2.0 of Google Answers was announced: Google Helpouts.

 

This is essentially a video question and answer platform, where for a flat or hourly fee, people can ask questions to be answered by those Google hand-selects and runs background checks on.

Health care is an obvious target, as Helpouts make it a point to mention that its video interchanges are HIPAA-compliant.  Google also waives its 20% cut of the fee for health questions.

Already, a company called One Medical has a prominent presence on Google Helpouts.  Many others are sure to follow.

There is a tremendous demand for telehealth services, driven by provider shortages in the clinic, as well as people’s own busy schedules.  And frankly, some of what I see in the clinic doesn’t necessarily need to be seen in person.  For established patients, for instance, whom I need to monitor their blood pressure.  A remote option to monitor these patients would be ideal, both for me by clearing my schedule, and for the patient. ..

Sure, there are risks.  Prescribing drugs, dispensing medical advice over state lines, interacting with new patients, and complicated mental health scenarios come to mind.  Let’s see how the health industry overcomes these obstacles.


Via rob halkes
more...
rob halkes's curator insight, November 7, 2013 10:14 AM

Of course, Google is omnipotent ;-) It is easier to ask just a question, rather than just search the right information for yourself. I guess it will be a great service for anyone in their early phase of information need, one might state the "pre-professional" one of searching information. I do see it as another "social" channel option for people with health questions. But how to move on with your condition?

Will it also stand against the upcoming full servivce (e) health platforms, integrating care from health/wellness phases, through condition arising, treatment and rehab..?

Isn't health development an inspiring and thrilling thing at a time?

Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Medical Rescue: Healthcare Needed
Scoop.it!

Rip-Off: How Private-Sector Health Costs Are Killing the American Dream

Rip-Off: How Private-Sector Health Costs Are Killing the American Dream | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
Why do we pay more but get poorer results than other wealthy countries?

Via Margaret Reeve Panahi
more...
Margaret Reeve Panahi's curator insight, November 4, 2013 12:44 AM

Full on analysis of the situation.  

Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Neurocam wearable camera reads your brainwaves and records what interests you

Neurocam wearable camera reads your brainwaves and records what interests you | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it

The neurocam is the world's first wearable camera system that automatically records what interests you.

 

It consists of a headset with a brain-wave sensor and connects to an iPhone. The system estimates whether you're interested in something from the brain-waves captured by the sensor, and uses the iPhone's camera to record the scenes that appear to interest you.

 

Just buy wearing the neurocam, the scenes you have shown an interest in are recorded automatically, and are added to an album which you can look through later.

 

"Right now, the iPhone's camera is ready to record what's in my line of sight through a prism. The iPhone shows what the camera has captured, so it feels as if it's reading my mind. My brain-waves are analyzed by an iPhone app, which quantifies my level of interest on a scale from 0 to 100. If the level exceeds 60, the number turns red, and the camera starts to record automatically, producing a 5-second GIF animation."

 

"We're using the iPhone so that analysis and capture can be done with one device. But this is still a concept model. So, we think there are lots of possibilities, such as turning this into a wearable camera."


 

The neurocam arose from the neurowear project, which is involved with items that use brain-waves and bio-sensors, like necomimi, which works using brain-waves. The algorithm for quantifying brain-waves was co-developed with Associate Professor Mitsukura at Keio University.

 

In the future, the project team aims to create an emotional interface, which could link a range of devices and services to people's individual thoughts and feelings.

 

"Because this system is hands-free, we think it could capture a life log, which would be different from deliberately pressing a shutter to capture things you like. As an application in a B2B environment, neurocam could determine what goods in stores interest people. And because the information includes position data, you can do mapping, so it could also show what places people are interested in as an aid for urban development planning. We think it could be used in lots of ways like that."

 scooped from: http://www.diginfo.tv/v/13-0083-r-en.php
Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from diabetes and more
Scoop.it!

Beyond the Myth of the Artificial Pancreas | EE Times

Beyond the Myth of the Artificial Pancreas | EE Times | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
The buzz around the artificial pancreas sometimes neglects the realities behind this medical device.

Via Ellen H Ullman, MSW
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Trends in Retail Health Clinics and telemedicine
Scoop.it!

Medical services through phone: India

Medical services through phone: India | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
Can cellphones save lives? Marking a significant shift, Indian healthcare providers are now looking at extending medical services through mobile telephony.

Via eMedToday
more...
eMedToday's curator insight, October 28, 2013 3:00 AM

Last week saw the launch of a 46-member strong conglomeration of hospitals, health insurers, medical service providers under the aegis of NatHealth or the Health Federation of India which among other things plans to provide access to standardized healthcare at reasonable cost. 

Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

How to Find the Safest Technology for Your Kids

How to Find the Safest Technology for Your Kids | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
Keeping your kids safe with the newest technology isn't always easy. For some reason they seem to learn about the details of the technology more quickly and thoroughly than adults do. They can figu...

Via TechinBiz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jeyakumar Natarajan from The Atrial Fibrillation Independent Post
Scoop.it!

Cheaper sensors: better-informed decisions deliver good care for less money

Cheaper sensors: better-informed decisions deliver good care for less money | Role of wireless communication in medicine | Scoop.it
New consumer sensors let doctors monitor their patients from afar, and might make health care cheaper and more efficient.

Via Steve S Ryan, PhD
more...
No comment yet.