Riverside Immigration Attorney
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Riverside Immigration Attorney
Immigration Buzz For Banning, Beaumont, Blythe, Calimesa, Canyon Lake, Cathedral City, Coachella, Corona, Desert Hot Springs, Hemet, Indian Wells, Idyllwild, Indio, La Quinta, Lake Elsinore, Mecca, Menifee, Moreno Valley, Murrieta, Norco, Palm Desert, Palm Springs, Perris, Riverside, Rancho Mirage, Romoland, San Jacinto, Temecula, and Wildomar. https://www.bataraimmigrationlaw.com/riverside-immigration-lawyer.html
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Cities That Prove You Can Move Overseas And Live Comfortably: 10 Examples

Cities That Prove You Can Move Overseas And Live Comfortably: 10 Examples | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it

Buying a home overseas is not only for the wealthy. In some cases, living abroad is cheaper than living in the United States. The U.S. government doesn't compile official data on how many Americans reside overseas but the State Department estimates 9 million live abroad (a number that does not include military personnel serving in the armed forces).

Carlos Batara's insight:

Thinking about relocating abroad? (But I must warn you. Some of these may qualify as one of those less-than-civilized countries in the eyes of you know who.)

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Tips For Removing Permanent Residence Conditions With Or Without Your Spouse

In this video, immigration attorney Carlos Batara explores three topics related to winning green cards through marriage to a U.S. citizen spouse
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Venezuela On The Verge of Revolution: A Quick Overview

Venezuela On The Verge of Revolution: A Quick Overview | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
As we look on at the horrors in the Middle East and perhaps the makings of World War III, let’s not overlook that the people of Venezuela are in pain.

Via Sheunesu Hove
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Undocumented Irish Immigrants In The United States

Undocumented Irish Immigrants In The United States | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
They're spared the glances. The "go back to your country" slurs facing so many undocumented migrants in the US. But they live in fear. They don't call the police when there's a break in. They think twice before they bring a sick child to the emergency room. Only, they're white - and they're Irish.
Carlos Batara's insight:

They're almost invisible.  Yet, they are in plain sight.  

 

They're part of the immigration debate in this country about reforming our visa policies.  But like other ethnic groups, their concerns fall upon deaf ears.

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The Rise Of Hispanic Businesses: A Non-Immigration Issue With Or Without Taco Trucks On Every Corner?

The Rise Of Hispanic Businesses: A Non-Immigration Issue With Or Without Taco Trucks On Every Corner? | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
There are 4 million Hispanic-owned businesses in the U.S. creating jobs and economic growth. It's a contingent the candidates are not addressing.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

According to the Census Bureau, Hispanic businesses are growing at a rate 15 times the national average over the last decade.

 

No surprise that research shows the top five states for Hispanic small businesses are California (23 percent), Texas (19.7 percent), New York (9 percent), Florida (8.1 percent) and Arizona (3.8 percent).

 

I only have one question.  Do these figures include a taco truck on every corner

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#Fix96: It's Time To Reverse The Illegal Immigration Reform And Immigrant Responsibility Act Of 1996.

#Fix96: It's Time To Reverse The Illegal Immigration Reform And Immigrant Responsibility Act Of 1996. | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it

Much of this immigration law dysfunction today can be traced to

immigration laws passed by Congress and signed by President Clinton in 1996. 

Carlos Batara's insight:

 

I like this #Fix96 hash tag.  

 

For the past twenty years, those of us who defend immigrants have been forced to fight at a distinct disadvantage.  

 

On a personal level, it has often felt like a fight with one hand tied behind my back - as many due process rights and avenues of relief for immigrant were curtailed by the passage of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (IIRAIRA).

 

The new law had many ill effects, especially upon immigrants facing deportation charges at immigration court, as discussed here >>> The Congressional War Against Due Process At Immigration Court.

  

Help spread the word - Fix 96.

 

Maybe Hilary will be listening. After all, it was the other Clinton who signed the law.

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Catholic Church Leaders Divided Over Haitian Migrant Crisis In The Dominican Republic

Catholic Church Leaders Divided Over Haitian Migrant Crisis In The Dominican Republic | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
The BBC's Will Grant reports from the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic on how the issue of migrants and their precarious situation at the border is dividing some in the Catholic Church.
Carlos Batara's insight:

The Haitian migrant crisis in the Dominican Republic has led to a split of opinion among Catholic Church leaders in Lain America.

 

One local priest, Father Luc Leandre, is actively helping Haitian returnees from the Dominican Republic.  In his view, the deportation of Haitians a "grave crisis" and he feels supporting them is crucial.

 

Another priest, the Cardinal in Santo Domingo, Nicolas de Jesus Lopez, vocally supports deportations and thinks all Haitians should be sent back to their country.

 

What's your view?

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A Touch Of Irony: Palestinian Artist Exposes Absurdity Of Mexican - United States Border Wall

A Touch Of Irony: Palestinian Artist Exposes Absurdity Of Mexican - United States Border Wall | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
Palestinian artist Khaled Jarrar goes on a road trip along the Mexican border in an effort to examine the ideological boundaries between the US and the Middle East
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Temporary Protected Status For Honduras And Nicaragua Registration Period Ends July 15, 2016

Temporary Protected Status For Honduras And Nicaragua Registration Period Ends July 15, 2016 | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
San Bernardino Immigration Lawyer Outlines Temporary Protected Status Requirements, Benefits, And Deadlines For Hondurans And Nicaraguans.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

Hop to it! 

 

The TPS clock is ticking. The registration period for both Honduras and Nicaragua Temporary Protected Status ends on July 15, 2016.

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Is The GOP Barking Up The Wrong Alley: Immigrants And Taxes?

Is The GOP Barking Up The Wrong Alley: Immigrants And Taxes? | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
Republicans have leveled a string of complaints against the agency.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

Should Uncle Sam be more active in the crackdown of false social security numbers?

 

This is a question being raised by immigration reform opponents.  This approach seems flawed for at least three reasons.

 

First, most immigration application ask questions related to employment and tax payment history. Thus, it would not be too hard for the government to crack down on false SSN numbers even without the IRS's help.

 

Second, should the IRS expend some of its overburden resources on immigration-related matters? 

 

Third, sometimes the cure is worse than the disease. 

 

Consider a recent report published by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy has issued a new report on Undocumented Immigrants and Taxes.  Some key points:

 

At the state and local levels, they pay an estimated $11.64 billion each year in taxes, which includes over $6.9 billion in sales and excise taxes, $3.6 billion in property taxes, $1 billion in personal income taxes.

 

At least 50% of undocumented immigrant households file income tax returns. Of those who don’t file, many still have taxes withheld from their paychecks.

 

The full report is here: http://www.itep.org/pdf/immigration2016.pdf

 

(Article by Naomi Jagoda, The Hill, April 16, 2016.)

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As Diplomacy Grows, The Cuban Adjustment Act Nears The Finish Line

As Diplomacy Grows, The Cuban Adjustment Act Nears The Finish Line | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
San Bernardino Immigration Attorney Discusses Political, Policy, And Legal Ramifications Of Modifying Or Eliminating The Cuban Adjustment Act.
Carlos Batara's insight:


50 years ago, the Cold War was in full force.  Cuba and the U.S. were bitter rivals, highlighted by the Russian Missile Crisis which threatened a war of epic proportions.


In a move designed to create internal Cuban dissent, the U.S. policy makers crafted the Cuban Adjustment Act - a law enabling Cuban immigrants to apply for permanent residency once they had lived for at least one year after they were admitted or paroled into the country. 


Called the “one year and a day” rule, ethnic leaders from other immigrant communities have criticized the disparity between the eased path for Cubans and the waiting lines for their own constituents.


However, with the move towards full diplomatic relations, the Cuban Adjustment Act has come under questioning, even from Cuban American political leaders.  Part of this is due to a recent Pew Research Center study showing a 78% increase in Cuban immigrants, as well as claims of social security fraud in various Cuban communities.


In fact, the American Immigration Council joined in the call to begin the re-examination of our immigration policies towards Cuban immigrants.


The likelihood of the Cuban Adjustment Act remaining intact is, at best, slim.  

 

The real question is whether some replacement will be devised or whether Cubans will simply be placed into the same long, long, long waiting lines as other immigrants.





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Latino Political Power: The Sleeping Giant Snoozes

Latino Political Power: The Sleeping Giant Snoozes | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
Growing numbers haven’t led to real clout.
Carlos Batara's insight:


One thing that irritates me is the claims of "wanna be" Latino activists claiming the Latino vote is going to rid the earth of Trump and his cohorts.


I started organizing communities when I was a teenager.  Each election cycle since that time has demonstrated the same shortcomings. 


Will the next election be any different?


Perhaps.  Perhaps not.


But stop - really, stop - the thumping until Latino voters have shown their their power at the polls. 


Not simply in showing up, but also, and more significantly, in voting as a coordinated bloc that decisively swings the outcome.

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A Story Of Real Courage: ISIS Hunts Man For Rescuing Yazidi Slaves

A Story Of Real Courage: ISIS Hunts Man For Rescuing Yazidi Slaves | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
Despite a $500,000 bounty having been placed by ISIS on his head, Abu Shuja continues to risk his life saving Iraqi Yazidi women and children from Islamic State captivity. “Victims of ISIS” is the story of Shuja and those he freed as told to RT documentary.

Via Quociente Cultural , Jocelyn Stoller
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Visa Waiver Entry Requirements Tightened

Visa Waiver Entry Requirements Tightened | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it

Dozens of countries, mostly in Europe, must meet additional security requirements for their citizens to continue to be allowed into the United States without a visa, the Department of Homeland Security recently announced.

Carlos Batara's insight:

 

All good things must end.  At least when it comes to immigration in the Age of Trump.

 

And as reported by Ron Nixon, writing for the New York Times, change was recently announced for the Visa Waiver Program, a relatively innocuous immigration program. 

 

The change, in actuality, was a no-brainer.  The only real question was why this change took so long.

 

What is the Visa Waiver Program?

 

In short, the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) was created in 1986 to facilitate easier travel to and tourism in the U.S. by individuals from friendly nations. Countries with a history of high illegal entry into the U.S. are excluded.

 

Most likely, this was the reason for the delay.  Only individuals from "friendly nations" can apply.

 

The program is relatively simple. It allows these individuals to  travel to the U.S. for up to 90 days without obtaining a visa.

 

Once approved, a traveler is pre-approved for visa-free travel for two years.

 

But membership in the program is not automatic.  Nations which VWP membership have needed to meet various security and travel-related requirements to be considered for admittance.  Now, there are the additional requirements.

 

According to the New York Times article, 20 million tourists enter the U.S. each year under the visa waiver program.  

 

Based on my experience handling Visa Waiver cases, I found the Times discussion on "overstays" slightly confusing. 

 

When the Times article discussed the issue of overstays - those individuals who overstay their temporary visas - it appears the story flipped to a wider immigration issue.  The discussion seems to discuss "all overstays", from all temporary visa programs, not just overstays from visa waiver entrants.  

 

One of the biggest reasons for overstays, in general, is wanting to remain in the U.S. with a person that the visitor is romantically involved with, and hopes to marry.  This issues cuts across all temporary visa programs.

 

However, as I discussed in The Cold Heart Of ICE: Immigrant Love Under The Visa Waiver Program, the ability to immigrate via a marriage-based green card has been a major problem for VWP entrants due to the visa waiver limits.

 

Other types of VWP overstay issues, like this one which involved an visa waiver overstay overlap with the Cuban Adjustment Act, are relatively uncommon.

 

You can read the full New York Times article here: Trump Administration Adds Restrictions For Visa-Waiver Countries.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Father's Day Tribute To My Father: An Immigrant Success Story

A Father's Day Tribute To My Father: An Immigrant Success Story | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
San Diego immigration lawyer Carlos Batara shares how his father, born in the Philippines, inspired him to become a Harvard-trained advocate for immigrants.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

He never went home.

 

He left his native county at the age of 20 to find work. Born in an impoverished area of a poor country, he left home to earn money which he could send back to his mother and eight siblings.

 

He ventured through, and stayed briefly at, a few countries, eventually reaching the United States.

 

For the next 25 years, he crisscrossed California, Arizona, and Utah, moving from crop to crop before settling in San Diego where he worked as a dishwasher at one of the city’s most prestigious restaurants.

 

He worked Monday through Sunday at minimum wage, and was given only two days off per year, Thanksgiving and Christmas. He was not paid overtime and was not part of a union.

 

He never owned a car, boarding the number 11 bus at 3:15 p.m. and arriving at work at 4: 05 p.m. After closing time, he was responsible for mopping, dusting, sweeping, and cleaning the entire building, including both restrooms, the kitchen, and the giant freezer room.

 

He would get on the bus at 5:20 a.m. to return home. At 6:05 a.m. he would gently wake me up to go to school.

 

Read More >>> My Father: An Immigrant Success Story

 

 

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Will Trump Administration End TPS For Haitians in U.S.?

Will Trump Administration End TPS For Haitians in U.S.? | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
If approved, the action would impact thousands of Haitians in South Florida, home to one of the nation’s largest Haitian communities.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

Sooner or later, I have anticipated that the Trump Administration would set its sights on ending Temporary Protected Status - if not for all 13 nations currently protected, then for the countries which have been granted TPS protections the longest.

 

I did not think the first nation would be Haiti, one of the newer programs. Haiti, originally granted TPS in January 21, 2000, is still struggling to recover from two major natural disasters that killed more than 200,000 people.

 

The latest disaster, Hurricane Matthew, took place just six months ago and offset the reconstruction efforts from the January 2010 earthquake.

 

Yet, James McCament, Acting Director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, claims that conditions in Haiti have improved enough to end "temporary protected status" for Haitians., according to a copy of the letter obtained

 

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Donald Trump And Immigration: What Can We Expect?

Donald Trump And Immigration: What Can We Expect? | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
What might happen to immigration policy during his presidency?
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

Over the past week, I've been frequently asked what do I think will happen with immigration under a Trump administration.

 

The Forbes article here is one perspective.

 

On a personal level, I think folks who have benefitted from temporary measures like DACA, Stateside I-601 Waiver Applications, Prosecutorial Discretion at Immigration Court [including Administrative Closure] could be in a rough ride.

 

Even TPS beneficiaries may face the same problem.

 

The Trump term has the potential to be the nightmare I have feared with all temporary programs implemented by the Obama Administration.

 

Consider this: if you applied for DACA, what does the government know about your family? Most likely your parents and some of your siblings are also here without legal permission. In short, as I have warned, there is a long-term danger when you file these applications. By coming out of the shadow, the government has gained a fair amount of insight about other members of your family. 

 

They could now also be in the direct line of fire.

 

Here is my earlier writings on the Immigration Twilight Zone created by the Obama initiatives, however well intended.

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Migration Policy Institute Report Traces History Of Vietnamese Immigrants In The United States

Migration Policy Institute Report Traces History Of Vietnamese Immigrants In The United States | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
Now comprising the sixth largest foreign-born group in the country, the Vietnamese immigrant population in the United States has grown significantly since the end of the Vietnam War. Learn more about this population with the latest data in this Spotlight article.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

As a child growing up and watching news after news report about the ongoing conflict in Vietnam, a new report by the Migration Policy Institute on the Vietnamese immigrant population in the United States warms my heart.

 

I didn't understand the Vietnam War until I entered college, and then I was opposed to it.  I watched the public reaction, a mixed bag of emotions, when the first large-scale Vietnamese migration to the United States started as an influx of refugees following the end of the Vietnam War in 1975.

 

As the MPI report explains, early refugees were part of the United States-sponsored evacuation, which consisted mainly of military personnel and urban, well-educated professionals associated with the U.S. military or the South Vietnamese government.

 

A second wave of Vietnamese refugees, commonly known as “boat people,” arrived in the late 1970s. The majority of these arrivals came from rural areas and were often less educated.

 

At present, Vietnamese is the sixth largest immigrant group in the country - something very few, if any, would have predicted during my teenage years in the 1960s.  

 

 

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A Shared Border, A Shared Problem: Air Pollution

A Shared Border, A Shared Problem: Air Pollution | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
Two nations, one worsening problem.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

Unfortunately, our government sees border issues in a too-narrow framework. 

 

After all, shared borders create shared problems beyond just the movement of people from one place to another.

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Nearly 1 In 4 Students At This Los Angeles High School Migrated From Central America — Many Without Their Parents

Nearly 1 In 4 Students At This Los Angeles High School Migrated From Central America — Many Without Their Parents | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
Gaspar Marcos stepped off the 720 bus into early-morning darkness in MacArthur Park after the end of an eight-hour shift of scrubbing dishes in a Westwood
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

Belmont High School Principal Kristen McGregor said it has forced the school to reimagine its role in its students’ lives.

“Our students, a lot of them have to work. A lot of them have to send money home or pay for rent,” she said. “This is going to take a rethinking of education in general. Sure, they get into school, but what’s next? How do we support them?”

 

McGregor said some of the immigrant children who came to L.A. showed up at Belmont in the Westlake neighborhood almost immediately. Others enrolled a few years later, having first gone to work.

 

Because of this, many students, like Marcos, are older than other students at their grade level.  “They start here in the ninth grade, regardless of how old they are,” McGregor said. “Some finish at 19 or 20 years old.”

 

Many of these children have ended up at Belmont High because it had a reputation for welcoming them.   At Belmont, teachers contend with the trauma many of these children suffered in their countries of origin or along the treacherous journey north. Some of the students struggle against resentment and abandonment issues while getting to know a mother, father or family member who left them behind. Some run away.

 

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A Beer Commercial To Watch: What Makes Someone A Canadian?

A Beer Commercial To Watch: What Makes Someone A Canadian? | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
Carlos Batara's insight:

This is a Molson Beer commercial.  It could well be a Canadian insult aimed at Donald Trump and others like him who seem to dislike all immigrants.

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California Sees Surge In Chinese Illegally Crossing Border From Mexico

California Sees Surge In Chinese Illegally Crossing Border From Mexico | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it

The number of Chinese immigrants illegally crossing the Mexican border into California has skyrocketed in recent years, the result of a lucrative smuggling industry, mass migration from China and a diversifying pool of migrants settling in the United States.

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Diversity Fusion In Action: Swing Dancers vs. Street Dancers - Montreal Swing Riot 2015

Formerly known as Lindy Hoppers vs. Street Dancers, this is part 3 of the Invitational Battle between Vintage and Modern Street Dancers at Montreal Swing Riot http://montrealswingriot.com
Carlos Batara's insight:


This video is cool to watch.


It is also an example of #diversityfusion, which illustrates that when folks from various cultures come together, something new is created.


What better than some cool dancing?

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Knock, Knock, Anybody Home. This Is ICE. We're Doing A Cold Call. A Cold-Blooded Cold Call.

Knock, Knock, Anybody Home.  This Is ICE. We're Doing A Cold Call. A Cold-Blooded Cold Call. | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
Visit the post for more.

Via Community Village Sites
Carlos Batara's insight:


Know Your Rights. 



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Three Key Lessons For Immigration Reformers From The Same-Sex Marriage Supreme Court Victory

Three Key Lessons For Immigration Reformers From The Same-Sex Marriage Supreme Court Victory | Riverside Immigration Attorney | Scoop.it
Riverside Immigration Attorney Discusses Political Takeaways From The Same-Sex Marriage Movement Supreme Court Victory For Immigration Reform Success.
Carlos Batara's insight:


If movement leaders study the success and failure of other movements, much insight can be gained.  The Supreme Court victory for those supporting same-sex marriages was not achieved overnight. 


Here are three key lessons for the immigration reform movement leaders:


Persistence, persistence, persistence


To win big, reformers must first win small


Failure is a choice, not an option


In short, far too many immigrants want change now – if not yesterday – and absent such an outcome, they lose heart.


This outcome needs dramatic political surgery - or long-term, comprehensive and compassionate reform may never see the light of the day.

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