Quest 2: A day in the life of....
66 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Gemma Ellaway
Scoop.it!

Samuel Dowling, Pipe Layer

Samuel Dowling, Pipe Layer | Quest 2: A day in the life of.... | Scoop.it

Meet Samuel Dowling whom is a Pipe Layer for a Civil Construction Company named Clides Construction. Sam has been involved in the civil construction work for over 3 years now and loves his job. Being a pipe layer comes with many responsibilities and everyday Sam works by safety regulations and comes across possible hazards that could have major affects on himself and his workmates. It is up to Sam and his workmates to be safe, diligent and follow all rules and regulations when at work to create the working site the safest it can be.

Gemma Ellaway's insight:

Sam and his team of workers at Clides Construction have strict rules and regulations according to their job. The have a mandatory uniform which is displayed in the picture. They have a uniform short which has fluorescent yellow on the top of it to ensure workers are clearly visible. This reduces the risk of a worker being unseen and then being potentially at the risk of harm; being hit by a truck/car or for example someone not seeing other workers and accidently causing harm to them. Hence, the shirt with fluorescent yellow on it is worn at all times when at work so workers can be visible and easily seen. This shirt also has a collar and short or long sleeves on it. This helps to protect the workers from sun damage to the body. Workers can choose what shorts they wear as long as they are appropriate for work; knee length, easy to move in, sun protectant. As you can see in the photo Sam is wearing steel cap boots, these are mandatory shoes and must always be worn by workers when on site. Sam and his fellow workers wear these shoes to reduce the risk of harm coming to their feet. A heavy item could accidently fall onto Sam’s foot causing major damage or hot liquid could accidently be poured onto Sam’s foot causing serious burns, therefor the steel cap boots are a mandatory item of shoes when at work so the risk of harm coming to the workers is reduced. Sam wears sunglasses to work which are an optional item but are worn by most workers. Sam wears these sunglasses to help him see better on sunny days and to help protect his eyes from sun damage. Sam is wearing a helmet to protect his head from any damage. This is another mandatory item to be worn when on site as it could be very easy for something to slip and hit Sam in the head and cause major damage to his face, skull or brain if he wasn’t wearing a helmet. Therefor the wearing of the helmet helps to reduce the risk of damage to all the workers heads. Underneath the helmet Sam wears a wide brimmed hat. This is worn by all workers to help reduce the effects of the sun. The wide brimmed hat helps to lower the risk of workers getting sunburn and potentially having skin damaged caused from the sun. It also helps to lower the chance of workers getting sun/heat stroke as the wide brimmed hat helps to provide protection from the sun. All workers are supplied with sunscreen when on site to apply to their body areas which may be affected by the sun; face, arms, neck and legs. This also helps to reduce the risk of workers getting sunburnt and or heat/sun stroke. When working long hours purely in the sun light it is easy for workers to get sun/heat stroke and or become very fatigued and exhausted. To reduce the likelihood of this occurring workers are encouraged to drink at least 2 litres of water throughout the day. This is because sweat is made up of 95% and the human body gets its water supply from drinking water or eating. When the body becomes hot it sweats out the water in order to try and cool down. This is why workers are sternly encouraged to drink the minimum required amount of water as they work in the hot sun all day so the body may sweat more than usual resulting in the loss of more water from the body than usual. At Clides Construction Sam and his fellow workers work a little less during the hours of 11-2 as this is when the sun is at its worst. They work less during these hours to help minimise the risk of being affected by sun/heat stroke. As you can clearly see Sam faces extensive amounts of hazards, risks and occupational health and safety issues every day when he goes to work from being affected by the sun, sun stroke, falling equipment, hot equipment, truck/car incidents and many more. It is highly important to the staff at Clides Construction that they are safe, diligent and take extra care when at work in order to ensure the safety of the workers and the public people.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gemma Ellaway
Scoop.it!

Nicole Blyde, Lenard's Owner

Nicole Blyde, Lenard's Owner | Quest 2: A day in the life of.... | Scoop.it

Meet Nicole Blyde, my boss from my second job at Lenards Chicken Yeppoon. Nicole and her husband Chris have been the owners of Lenards Chicken since the opening of Central Yeppoon over 5 years ago. Everyday Nicole goes to extensive measures to ensure we serve only the freshest and best chicken to all of our customers. Nicole has taught me to be a strong enthusiast in customer service and the presentation, hazards and cautions that must be taken into consideration in the handling of raw meat. Nicole is a fantastic boss and goes out of her way to ensure everything at Lenards is done correctly in order to withhold their reputation as the ‘freshest chicken’ in town.

Gemma Ellaway's insight:

Needless to say, Nicole and the staff at Lenards come across occupational health and safety issues every day in the workplace. Some of the concerns working at Lenards can be with the handling of sharp knives and how to use these knives correctly. We are trained to work the safest we can with knives. Some of our mandatory rules include; always using a chopping board when cutting up meat, once finished with a knife don’t just leave it laying around, immediately clean the knife and hang it back onto the knife rack. The reason we have to wash the knives immediately is due to the risk of leaving it laying around and someone not seeing it and cutting themselves on it, where as if it is washed and put away straight away then it is out of the way and isn’t at risk of causing harm to any other workers.  Another rule with knife handling is to never carry a knife around the shop with the blade facing out in front of you, as there is a risk you could trip and stab someone. The correct way we carry knifes is blade down, in your hand with your arm straight down your side. This is so the blade is at less risk of stabbing someone. At Lenards we also lift a lot of heavy crates of chicken. Nicole teaches her staff to lift these crates with their legs and not their backs. Nicole also explains to the staff that if we think the crate is too heavy to lift then always ask for help on lifting it. This reduces the risk of back injuries occurring at Lenards. Working with raw chicken we face the risks of chicken going off, salmonella or even the chicken not being cold enough. We reduce these risks by labelling every crate of chicken that comes in with the date so we know exactly when it arrived and we can determine how long the chicken we will stay fresh for. This reduces the risk of Nicole and her staff serving off chicken to customers. To reduce the risk of salmonella we ensure we only use clean cutting boards and we clean a cut board immediately after it has been used, we only work on clean surfaces, after we have had chicken on a bench we clean it with hot soapy water straight after and then sanitise the bench. We clean or hand regularly throughout the day. We clean our hands before and after serving customers, this reduces the risk of spreading germs. To keep the chicken from getting to hot we make sure the cold room door is only opened when necessary and while working with the chicken on the benches we regularly check the temperature of the chicken with a thermometer to ensure it is at the right temperature and hasn’t gone too hot. If the chicken is below the correct temperature, we immediately return it to the cold room and continue with it later once it is colder again. The temperature of the chicken in the window is also checked throughout the day to ensure the window temperature is correct. This reduces the risk of the chicken not being cold enough and going off. As you can see in the picture Nicole is wearing our mandatory Lenards uniform with apron, hat and hair net and closed in shoes. The apron and hat reduces the risk of hair falling into the chicken, the apron helps to stop chicken getting onto our uniforms and closed in shoes help to prevent injury to the foot, for example a knife falling on the foot. There are different roles and positions at Lenards; this role that I have just described is the role of the female workers. The junior male workers have a whole other working role at Lenards Yeppoon. The junior boys are in charge of keeping out the back of the shop as clean as it can be, washing and sanitising the mincer and sausage machine and keeping the cold room clean and tidy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gemma Ellaway
Scoop.it!

Tamara Ellaway, Dental Clinical Manager

Tamara Ellaway, Dental Clinical Manager | Quest 2: A day in the life of.... | Scoop.it

Meet Tamara Elaway, or also known as my elder sister. Tamara is my boss at Icon Dental Group where her position there gives her the title of Clinical Manager. Tamara was a dental assistant for 3 years before she took a break to do some further studying in order to obtain her position as Clinical Manager. Her role includes coordinating with the Practice Manager and the Practice owners on how the practice should be run, being in charge of the dental assistants, training new dental assistants and making sure everything is being done in the correct manner. Everyday Tamara comes across Occupational Health and Safety hazards and it is her job to put these hazards to a halt. I think Tamara does a fantastic job in training staff. She trains them not to try and cut conerns, to take their time and to make sure everything is done correctly. She endlessly talks about all the hazards and risks so everyone working there is aware, she also teaches us how to reduce these risks and create a safe and hygenic working environment.

Gemma Ellaway's insight:

As you can imagine, working at a dentist clinic there are endless hazards and safety risks. Icon Dental Group goes above and beyond in order to try and maintain a safe, hygienic and risk free working environment. We take many precautionary measures when working there for our safety and the safety of the patients and dentists. After spending a few weeks of working purely in the sterilisation room with Tamara guiding and teaching me in the correct way things should be done I can easily say that there are enormous amounts of safety hazards and potential risks in the sterilisation room, but we are trained correctly in order to minimise these risks. For instance, one false move like not wearing gloves at the correct time and touching a dirty instrument, using dirty instruments (when I mention the words ‘dirty instruments’ I am referring to instruments that have been used on patients and not yet been cleaned and sterilised yet or whenever I mention the word ‘dirty’ I am referring to anything that has not yet being sterilised) or not sterilising instruments the correct way could lead to the spread of infections like aids and many other harmful and potentially fatal infections. Tamara everyday hounds us dental assistants about how gloves are mandatory when touching any dirty instruments and once you are wearing gloves and they have touched dirty instruments they must be removed immediately before touching anything else this reduces the chance of spreading infection from the dirty instrument (you can imagine how many gloves we go through! Almost 80 boxes of gloves in a month!). If at any time a clean instrument touches something dirty like a bench, ground or any dirty instrument it must be taken back into the sterilisation room and completely cleaned again before it is used again. This is because although something may not look dirty, it could have infection from a patient prior. Hence this is why we thoroughly clean each surgery room down at the end of each patient’s appointment. The clean down is done wearing gloves. Firstly we take the dirty instruments on the assisting tray over to the dirty section of the bench and put them into a lunch box like container and do it up so if there was a chance of the container being dropped the dirty instruments would not touch and infect anyone. We then put on new gloves (as there could be infection from the last patient on the dirty instruments we were just touching) and use antibacterial wipes to clean the chairs of the patient, dental assistant and dentist. We then wipe down any surfaces (benches) in the room that instruments were near, and we wipe down where the instruments were. While still wearing gloves we take the container of the dirty instruments to the sterilisation room where they are cleaned and sterilised thoroughly (the process of cleaning and sterilising instruments can take up to 3 hours). The dental assistant then returns back to the now sterilised surgery room and sets up for the next patient with clean hands. As you can see in the photo Tamara has her room set up and is ready to see her patient. She has gloves on therefor she is reducing the risk of catching a disease or infection off the patient, she is wearing a mask over her mouth and nose, this is so nothing sprays out of the patients mouth and into Tamara’s nose or mouth and she is wearing glasses so nothing gets into her eyes. These are just a few of her safety precautionary measures in order to ensure the safety of the patient and herself. I could go on forever talking about the precautions and measures to ensure safety and reducing risks at Icon Dental Group, but I hope this description has given you a broad overview of what it is like to work at a dentist and all of the safety issues and hazards involved.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gemma Ellaway
Scoop.it!

Charmaine Buxton, Teacher Aide

Charmaine Buxton, Teacher Aide | Quest 2: A day in the life of.... | Scoop.it

Meet Charmaine Buxton who is a teacher aide at Rockhampton Special School. Charmaine specialises in being a Hydrotherapy Aide. This means that Charmaine spends majority of her time in the pool at work with students while teaching them how to use their bodies and runs through exercise programs with them to try and keep the students healthy.  Charmaine has been a teacher aide at Rockhampton Special School for 4 years but has prior experience of working with children with disabilities and mental issues. The staff at Rockhampton Special School must have a strong passion for the work they do as every day they are challenged, pushed to their limits and can become very exhausted. But they all push on, because they love their job and they love helping the students become the best they can be.

Gemma Ellaway's insight:

There are extensive amounts of Occupational Health and Safety hazards that the staff of Rockhampton Special School face each and every day. The staff there can be easily injured by the students; bitten, hit, punched, scratched or pushed over. If an incident like this occurs than the staff are to fill out an incident report immediately explaining exactly what happened. This is done so they can think if the situation could have been resolved in a different way or if it was resolved correctly. As you can see in the photo Charmaine is the teacher aide standing up and there is a teacher aide sitting in the sling purely for this photo. The only staff that are authorised to use this harness are staff that have been previously trained to use it. As if any untrained staff member chose to use it, they run the risk of damaging the harness or injuring the student or themselves. Hence why only trained staff are allowed to use it, to reduce the risk of damage and injuring to those in the school. The teacher aide sitting in the sling is Bev Van Nunen. Bev volunteered to sit in the sling for this photo as a photo of an actual student sitting in the sling would breach privacy and confidentiality regulations. So as I explain the situation in the photo I will refer to Bev as the student to give a clear idea of what is happening. When a student who is in a wheel chair needs their nappy changed this harness is used to assist the teacher aide in doing so. The teacher aide will apply the harness to the student sitting in the wheelchair and ensure that it is done correctly and there is no chance of it coming undone. This is generally a two person job to ensure the safety of both the student and the teacher aide. The harness is used to reduce the risk of strain on the teacher aides back. As if a teacher aide was to life numerous amounts of wheelchair children numerous amounts of times a day it would be almost certain for back injuries to occur to the teacher aide and it could also be dangerous for the student. The harness is used as a method of reducing workplace injuries. When using the harness the teacher aide must ensure that the sling matches the weight of the student and adjust it if necessary. Staff are to use only slings that actually match the hoist and that are made for this certain hoist, this is done for insurance, liability and safety reasons. Charmaine ensures that the bed the student is being lifted to be at an okay height where it won’t be causing harm to her back when leaning over to change the student’s nappy. Once the student is strapped into the harness the student is lifted from the wheelchair. While the student is being lifted the teacher aide is to slightly support the students back and ensure the student is in a comfortable position that doesn’t cause harm to them. The student is then let down gently onto the bed where their nappy can be changed. The same is then repeated to get the student back to the wheelchair. As you could imagine without this harness this simple job could be very dangerous for both students and teacher aides. As you can see by looking at Charmaine she is dressed in a mandatory work uniform. Her uniform includes a work t-shirt so staff can be easily distinguished from the students, knee length black pants that are easy to move and work in and are appropriate for work and closed in supportive shoes are worn as workers are on their feet all day therefor they want to be able to wear something on their feet that is supportive and comfortable. Also it is safer for workers to wear closed in shoes rather than open shoes. Whenever a worker goes outside they are to wear a hat. This reduces the chance of sun exposure which can result in sun cancer. Wearing a hat outside also sets a good example to the students. These are just a few examples of some workplace hazards that staff face every day at Rockhampton Special School. There are just endless amounts of hazards and work place health and safety regulations that they come across every day at work.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gemma Ellaway
Scoop.it!

Chris Ellaway, Maintenance Manager

Chris Ellaway, Maintenance Manager | Quest 2: A day in the life of.... | Scoop.it

Meet Chris Ellaway, or also known as my father. Chris is a Maintenance Manager for the major mining company Thiess where he is based at Lake Vermont. Chris has been involved in the mining industry for 30 years where he has gained much experience and knowledge of his surroundings. The position of Maintenance Manager gives Chris the responsibilities of  being in charge of all the workers (in a mine there are extensive amounts of workers to control), running the mine and making sure the mine site is a safe and ethical working environment for all workers.

Gemma Ellaway's insight:

Chris thoroughly enjoys his tough job at Lake Vermont where his responsibilities are endless. Having personal experience with Chris, with him being my dad, I realise that he literally never stops working. He works away in Dysart from Monday to Friday and comes home on the weekend, but even then on the weekend he is constantly on his phone answering calls and emails regarding anything and everything that is happening at the mine. There are an extreme amount of hazards and occupational health and safety issues that could arise at a mine. Some being; mud rush, truck crash, car crash, equipment breaking and ending fatal for the person using it, getting knocked over by something (coal, equipment, loose objects) etc. As you can see in the photo posted it is a picture of Chris and another worker working on a large truck. They are wearing all the correct safety equipment, the safety equipment is as follows. A mandatory orange shirt which glows in the dark and stands out during the day, this helps other workers to be able to see everyone on the mine site and reduces the risk of someone not being seen and causing an accident. This shirt is also a protectant from the sun; it reduces the risk of the worker getting sun burnt and potentially getting sun stroke. A hard top safety helmet is worn to protect the head from any falling objects that could fall and potentially kill or harm the workers. The workers in the photograph are also wearing sun protection under their helmets, this reduces the bodies exposure to the sun and helps to eliminate the chance of workers getting sun stroke or sun burnt in that area. The workers are also wearing sunglasses which prevents the risk of small flying objects flying and landing in their eyes which could potentially blind the workers and harm  their eyes. The glasses also protect the workers against the sun and help them to see clearer on sunny days. It is not visible in this photograph but steel cap boots are also worn. These boots are worn to protect the workers feet against any harm, for example the potential risk of something heavy falling and landing on the workers foot, which could then potentially break or injure the foot, but with the steel cap boots this risk is reduced immensely. The last safety object being worn is a safety harness. These are used so the worker can attach themselves to objects for safety reasons. For example they might attach themselves to a large truck if they are working high up on it so that if they fall they will be caught be the harness reducing the risk of possible fatal accident. As you can imagine these are just a few precautionary safety regulations at a mine site, there are many more regulations in place at this mine on order to create a safe working environment with lower fatality and injury rates. The safety of this mine is mostly created through extensive training. Chris has undertaken a few different types of training so he can make Lake Vermont a safe mine. Some of the training Chris has completed is Generic Coal Industry, S1, 2 & 3 Training (Mining Supervisor) and JSEO (Job Safety & Environment Observation) training. With Chris having undertaken these safety and training courses he can pass his knowledge onto those around him and instruct on how to make the mine a safer place for his workers.

more...
No comment yet.