Rhineland-Lea Valley-Cork
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Rhenish Ware

Rhenish Ware | Rhineland-Lea Valley-Cork | Scoop.it

"Defining Attributes:

 

A salt-glazed stoneware that comes in two major varieties: Rhenish brown, a buff to dark gray bodied ware coated with a speckled brownish slip, and Rhenish blue and gray, a light gray bodied ceramic often colored with cobalt blue or manganese purple pigments. Both varieties can be decorated with incised or applied molded relief decorations."

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Ripuarian Franks - Wikipedia

Ripuarian Franks - Wikipedia | Rhineland-Lea Valley-Cork | Scoop.it

"Etymology


The anglicized name Ripuarian, from a Latin original, Ripuarii, with variants Ripaurii and Riparii, to a speaker or writer of Latin and any Germanic language is an obvious compound of Latin ripa, "bank," "river,"[10] and Latinized Germanic -uarii, to mean people from the Rhine according to Perry and others. The specific nuance, in this view, is "river-dwelling" and would be used to differentiate them from the Salian Franks (the Franks of the Sal, the IJs-sel River, or the Franks of the "salty sea.") It appears to be a mixture of languages.

Of the three possible etymological reactions, one is that the entire word was Germanic but was made into a mixture in the culture of educated Latin writers. Accordingly Ripuarii might be restored as either *hreop-waren, *hrepa-waren[11] or *hreop-wehren, *hrepa-wehren,[12] corresponding to an Anglo-Saxon word, hreopseta, "settlement on a bank (or river)." The -waren would be from Germanic *weraz, "people,"[13] resulting in "river-people" or "bank-people." The -wehren would be from Germanic *warjan, "defend,"[14] resulting in "defenders of the shore." The latter title would be more likely to be conferred by the Romans in the hope that the Franks would live up to it than it would be a self-name of the Franks, who were not defending the shore against anything. The *hrepa- or *hreop- remains obscure. From context it must mean "bank."

A second point of view is that Ripuarian was originally Latin and was loaned into Germanic.[15] This view is based on a word-pair given in the Summarium Heinrici, an 11th century revision of Isidore of Seville, stating the Old High German equivalents of some Latin words, including Ripuarii: Riphera. The latter is textually reconstructed to *ripfera, except that "phonetically *ripf- cannot come from rip-;"[16] that is, Ripuarii, not being in the process leading to Old High German, is not Germanic. In this view, the Riparii of Jordanes, the first attestation of the word, if the Ripuarians were really meant, is the original. It is simply a plural noun formed from the adjective, Riparius, "of the bank" or "of the river." Ripuarii and Ripoari would be corruptions. Other attested forms of the adjective are Riparenses and Riparienses."

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A Woman's Life in the Court of the Sun King: Letters of Liselotte Von Der Pfalz, Elisabeth Charlotte, Duchesse D' Orlians, 1652-1722

Find A Woman's Life in the Court of the Sun King: Letters of Liselotte Von Der Pfalz, Elisabeth Charlotte, Duchesse D' Orlians, 1652-1722 


"On 16 November 1671, Liselotte von der Pfalz, the nineteen-year-old daughter of the Elector of Palatine, was married to Philippe d'Orlans, "Monsieur," the only brother of Louis XIV. The marriage was not to be a happy one. Liselotte (known in France as Elisabeth Charlotte, Duchesse d'Orlans, or "Madame") was full of intellectual energy and moral rigor. Homesick for her native Germany, she felt temperamentally ill-suited to life at the French court. The homosexual Monsieur, deeply immersed in the pleasures and intrigues of the court, shared few of his wife's interests. Yet, for the next fifty years, Liselotte remained in France, never far from the center of one of the most glorious courts of Europe. And throughout this period, she wrote letters -- sometimes as many as forty week -- to her friends and relatives in Germany. It is from this extraordinary body of correspondence that A Woman's Life in the Court of the Sun King has been fashioned. As introduced and translated by Elborg Forster, the letters have become the remarkable personal narrative of Liselotte's transformation from an innocent, yet outspoken, girl into a formidable observer of great events and human folly"

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River Lee (Ireland) - Wikipedia

River Lee (Ireland) - Wikipedia | Rhineland-Lea Valley-Cork | Scoop.it

The Lee (Irish: An Laoi) is a river in Ireland. It rises in the Shehy Mountains on the western border of County Cork and flows eastwards through Cork City, where it splits in two for a short distance, creating an island on which Cork's city centre is built, and empties into the Celtic Sea at Cork Harbour on the south coast, one of the largest natural harbours in the world. A hydro-electric scheme was built on the river, upstream from Cork City, and this part of the river now contains the Carrigadrohid and Inniscarra reservoirs. The river is crossed by 42 bridges, 29 of which are in Cork City, and one tunnel. The river also provides an 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) stretch of salmon fishing.

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Bernd and Hilla Becher - Wikipedia

Bernd and Hilla Becher - Wikipedia | Rhineland-Lea Valley-Cork | Scoop.it

"Bernd Becher was born in Siegen, North Rhine-Westphalia."

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Mrs. Deane introduces the Becher Box

Mrs. Deane introduces the Becher Box | Rhineland-Lea Valley-Cork | Scoop.it

"This boxed set of prints grew out of a for­tu­itous play on words that turned into a sin­gu­lar homage to Bernd and Hille Becher, the col­lab­o­ra­tive pho­tog­ra­phers whose names have become almost equiv­a­lent to pho­to­graphic typolo­gies. In Ger­man, the word Becher also means cup or con­tainer, and we sim­ply could not resist cre­at­ing a typol­ogy of the Joghurtbecher."

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BATTLE AT THE REMAGEN BRIDGE AND BRIDGEHEAD (Warren A. Robinson, joined Company B, 47th Infantry Regiment, Ninth Infantry Division at the Remagen Bridge)

"The terrain proved to be another obstacle, and the regiment was measuring less gains on the 12th. March 13th brought a continuation of the rough and tumble battle for the bridgehead’s high ground, while the Raiders started their portion of the attack toward Notscheid and its commanding Hill 357. Throughout these attacks heavy automatic weapons and small-arms fire continued to slow down the advance, but did not halt it.

...Lt. Colonel Peter O. Ward directed the attack which was without respite for the enemy. After stiff enemy resistance the savagely attacking infantrymen of the Ninth fanned ever eastward, out of the Remagen Bridgehead and toward the Wied River. Doughs seized high ground at every available opportunity, which made repulsion of counterattacks much easier in the outlying portions of the Division sector. Throughout March 14-15, the Old Reliables punched forward against the Division objectives of Lorscheid and Notscheid. Each hill and high point or ridge was an intermediate objective for a regiment or battalion or company, and it was by this strategy that the build-up was accomplished so speedily. El Guettar taught the Ninth Division a lesson, one it never forgot-he who holds the heights controls the situation."

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Westerwald Potter's History

"The Westerwald is high mountains between Rhine, Lahn and Sieg, on which one does not see anything as sky, puddles and large stones." (W. H. Riehl)

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Liselotte von der Pfalz

Liselotte von der Pfalz | Rhineland-Lea Valley-Cork | Scoop.it

"I believe that the histories that will be written about this court after we are gone will be better and more entertaining than any novel, and I am afraid that those who come after us will not be able to believe them and think they are just fairytales."

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G/11603 PRIVATE W C NOTSCHEID 4TH MIDDX

"Karl August Notscheid was killed on 1st july 1916 at fricourt and is buried in gordon dump cemetary, he was born in england of german parents, and enlisted in his late thirties after being taunted by a relative to prove his britishness.

 

As an aside a german relative was an artillery man and took part in the somme battle as well."

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