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Escape from Camp 14

Escape from Camp 14 | Rexroad North Korea | Scoop.it
A New York Times bestseller, the shocking story of one of the few people born in a North Korean political prison to have escaped and surv...
Katherine Rexroad's insight:

Escape from Camp 14 is a biography about a man named Shin. Shin was born in a North Korean Prison camp. Life in North Korean Prison camps involves scavenging for food, working to death, and telling on other prisoners for extra privileges. In school, Shin was required to memorize 10 simple rules. Due to the fact Shin was brought up in this environment, he believed these rules to be fair and just. The women of the camp sometimes sleep with the guards in order to get extra food. However, if these women become pregnant they are put to death. On occasion, the authorities of the prison camp let a male and a female prisoner breed and have a child. This is how Shin was brought into the world. At the age of 14 he told on his mother for trying to escape with his older brother. As a result, his mother was hung and his brother shot immediately. However, Shin suffered through interrogation involving being hung from the ceiling for hours and being burned slowly. In his interrogation cell, he meant an older man named Park. Park told shin about the world outside of camp 14. When the guards finally realized he did not know any information about his families attempted escape plan, they returned him to work. Many years later Shin managed to escape camp 14. Park died in the process of this escape but Shin did not yet know how to feel remorse for another. With the little knowledge Park had left him with, Shin escaped to China against all odds. His life was hardly more glamorous after his escape considering he lived off of stealing on the streets. He did find work at a pig farm for a short period of time but was asked to leave. He meets a Journalist who helps him discover his new purpose in life; to raise awareness of North Korean prison camps for a human rights organization. To this day he struggles to feel “human”.

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This is Paradise!

This is Paradise! | Rexroad North Korea | Scoop.it
This is Paradise! is a shocking and moving portrayal of scenes of every day life in North Korea, a secretive and brutal nation. Hyok Kang...
Katherine Rexroad's insight:

To further explore the nation of North Korea I would read this book. The title "This is Paradise" captures the corruption of the government through the delusional view of its citizens. I am egger to learn more about life in North Korea. 

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Human Rights Organizations - The Role of Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) in Human Rights Advocacy

Human Rights Organizations - The Role of Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) in Human Rights Advocacy | Rexroad North Korea | Scoop.it
Find out how Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) help the cause of human rights by monitoring the actions of governments and pressuring them to act according to human rights principles.
Katherine Rexroad's insight:

The article “What are Human Rights?” on the official United for Human Rights website defines the term “human rights”. It proposed that any human (man, woman, or child) should have a number of guaranteed rights simply because of the fact they are human. Many people, however, are not aware of their basic rights. Many more, live in countries where their rights are taken from the, for example, North Korea. In the aftermath of World War II, the United Nations, which had just been invented, created the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It states all humans are born free and equal and are in title to these rights regardless of race, sex, age, political opinion, language, status, or religion. The document also makes a statement against torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. No one can be placed under arbitrary arrest or receive a heavier penalty than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offence was committed. In other words one must commit a crime to be arrested and the punishment for that person must fit the crime. Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his or her own, and to return to his or her country under this document. Furthermore, People cannot be married without the free and full consent of the intending spouses. All of these rights and more are violated consistently in North Korea.

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Children of the Prison Camps

Children of the Prison Camps | Rexroad North Korea | Scoop.it
Katherine Rexroad's insight:

This picture struck me because it portrayed the severe malnutrition of the prisoners of North Korea. What is so striking about it is the fact these children are not in an unusual condition. The children in the Prison camps are only given “soup” which consists of salt, water, and cabbage. They depend on the food they can steal without getting caught.

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World History in Context - Document

World History in Context - Document | Rexroad North Korea | Scoop.it
World History in Context
Katherine Rexroad's insight:

The article “Korea” from the Gale world history in context database extensively covered the history of Korea from 1450 to 2006. My research focused specifically on the time period from World War 2 to modern times. In 1945, Korea gained independence from Japan. Their initial goal then was to improve human rights in their own country. However, Korea’s liberation separated them from the strong Japanese economy. This made the country vulnerable during the cold war. To put it simply, the country was split between the USA and USSR. The south became capitalist while the north became socialist. North Korea fell into dictatorship when Kim-Il-Sung rose into power. Since then, North Korea has been isolated from the rest of the world both socially and economically.

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The VICE Guide to North Korea

The VICE Guide to North Korea | Rexroad North Korea | Scoop.it
Getting into North Korea was one of the hardest and weirdest processes VBS has ever dealt with. From the authors: After we went back and forth with their...
Katherine Rexroad's insight:

Vice’s Guide to North Korea was the most relevant documentary I found on the Top Documentaries wed site. The first 15 minutes of the documentary is about the filmmakers trying to find a way into North Korea. They explain the reasons for North Korea’s isolation and look across the DMZ (demilitarized zone). 24 hours a day soldiers from North Korea and soldiers from South Korea stand at the edge of their country and stare at each other at the DMZ. This tension and over exaggerated precaution demonstrates the manipulative power of the North Korean government along with North Korea’s extreme isolation. They do not want the outside world to have any influence on their country. When the documentary team finally gets into North Korea, they realize that they are on a tour and are not allowed to roam the country freely. Throughout the documentary the filming team is shown pictures and statures of the “dear leader” Kim Jong IL, Kim Jun Un, and Kim IL Sung. Multiple times throughout the film, the tour guides or guards threaten to arrest the documentary tourist for disrespecting the leaders. These offenses include simple things, such as, standing in front of pictures of dear leader or singing their traditional songs incorrectly. The team observes the manipulative power of the government through Korea’s Media in which America is referred to as imperialist and North Korea is called a “Democratic Republic” when it is clearing a totalitarian dictatorship.

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North Korea Geography

North Korea Geography | Rexroad North Korea | Scoop.it
Katherine Rexroad's insight:

Camp 14 is located just south of Kaechon which is not far from Pyongyang. Shin did not discover his location, however, until after he escaped the prison camp. In fact he knew nothing about the geography of his own country. 

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Student Resources in Context - Document

Student Resources in Context - Document | Rexroad North Korea | Scoop.it
Student Resources in Context
Katherine Rexroad's insight:

The Gale student resource canter provided and excellent article on post traumatic stress disorders. This condition was first known as “shell shock” because the soldiers that returned from World War I and II were, in a way too, “shocked” to function in normal day society. These soldiers would experience nightmares and flash backs from their traumatic war experiences when they returned home. This mental illness happens when a person experiences severe feelings of anxiety following some major disruption in his or her life. Scientist are still puzzled by this illness and do not know exactly what causes it. In fact, two people can experience the same event but it is possible only one develops the disorder. For example, many soldiers did not experience PTSD. The symptoms include flashbacks, constant nightmares or other sleep disorders, trouble expressing or feeling emotions, and intense distress when reminded of the original event. Sometimes these symptoms take years to show up after a traumatic event other times they occur immediately after. Not all patients experience the same symptoms or all of them. Many people, such as rescues from the holocaust concentration camps, never recover fully from posttraumatic stress.

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Inside North Korea

In which John discusses life inside a North Korean concentration camp as reported by Shin Dong-hyuk, the only person ever known to have gotten out of North K...
Katherine Rexroad's insight:

John Green, one of my favorite authors, gives the book Escape from Camp 14 an excellent review. He even expands on the book by asking 

philosophical questions about humanity itself . This video is the reason I choose to read this book. 

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