Resource Compilation (4.6) - Earth Science Final Project
6 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Brett Klinkner
Scoop.it!

Additional Resources

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/imageo/2014/06/20/sudden-surge-melting-seen-atop-greenlands-ice-sheet/#.U7t8ohbPb2Y

 

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/03/27/world/climate-rising-seas.html?_r=0

 

http://arstechnica.com/science/2014/07/greenland-melt-may-have-pushed-sea-level-six-meters-higher-in-the-past/

 

http://laboratoriet.dk/klimapolitik/kyoto_og_groenland/&new_language=1

 

An Inconvenient Truth

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brett Klinkner
Scoop.it!

Scientists Warn of Rising Oceans From Polar Melt

Scientists Warn of Rising Oceans From Polar Melt | Resource Compilation (4.6) - Earth Science Final Project | Scoop.it
The depletion of large parts of the ice sheet in West Antarctica is almost certainly unstoppable, with global warming accelerating the disintegration, two groups of scientists reported Monday.
Brett Klinkner's insight:

An article concerning itself especially with the grave implications on generations to come and projections of ice melt consequences down the road, this resource pulls no punches in laying out that we are entering the phase of “irreversible retreat” regarding ice melt in the Antarctic and Greenland vicinity and subsequent sea level rise. A glaciologist from the 70s predicted very nearly precisely this, and the article expounds upon what a century or so from now is likely to offer at this rate.


Gillis, Justin, and Kenneth Chang. "Scientists Warn of Rising Oceans From Polar Melt." The New York Times. The New York Times, 12 May 2014. Web. <http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/13/science/earth/collapse-of-parts-of-west-antarctica-ice-sheet-has-begun-scientists-say.html>.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brett Klinkner
Scoop.it!

Chasing Ice: VIDEO (via MATC Libraries online)

Click here to edit the title

Brett Klinkner's insight:

Nature photographer James Balog’s documentation centering on the erosion of glaciers in Switzerland, Greenland, Iceland, and Alaska. “Climate change in action.”


Balog, James, dir. "Chasing Ice." Moyers & Company. October 12, 2012. Web. < http://ezproxy.madisoncollege.edu:2051/PortalViewVideo.aspx?xtid=52390 >.


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Brett Klinkner from Climate Change & The Cryosphere
Scoop.it!

SOTC: Contribution of the Cryosphere to Changes in Sea Level | National Snow and Ice Data Center

SOTC: Contribution of the Cryosphere to Changes in Sea Level | National Snow and Ice Data Center | Resource Compilation (4.6) - Earth Science Final Project | Scoop.it
more...
Brett Klinkner's curator insight, June 22, 2014 3:07 PM

SOTC: Contribution of the Cryosphere to Changes in Sea Level

This article explains that in the past half-century we have begun to observe the first substantial sea level rise (relatively speaking — it’s at about 3mm per year) in the past few thousand years (as the ~21,000 years prior saw gradual, yet major rise following the last ice age), setting out to explain which cryosphere factors may actually be contributing to this. Seasonal snowfall hasn’t been observed to have a net increase over this time and therefore does not contribute to annual net sea level rise. Sea ice/ice shelves are already located in our oceans so they do not have further impact upon melting. The thawing of permafrost (thick, frozen subsurface layer of soil in polar regions) occasionally melts but it is not known at this time how significantly it streams, rivers, and eventually the sea. Alas, glacier melt is thought to be the major and most significant contributor to sea level rise currently and into the future (along with the naturally-occurring ocean thermal expansion). Because thermal expansion has only been seen to produce a sea level rise between 0.42 and 0.69 millimeters per year (from about 1960-2003), and this shifted to a range of 1.6mm and 1.19mm per year by the end of that range, glacier melt is increasingly being monitored and analyzed.


Link: http://nsidc.org/cryosphere/sotc/sea_level.html

 

"SOTC: Contribution of the Cryosphere to Changes in Sea Level." SOTC: Contribution of the Cryosphere to Changes in Sea Level. National Snow & Ice Data Center, 6 Feb. 2014. Web. 22 June 2014. <http://nsidc.org/cryosphere/sotc/sea_level.html>.

Scooped by Brett Klinkner
Scoop.it!

Dark snow: from the Arctic to the Himalayas, the phenomenon that is accelerating glacier melting

Dark snow: from the Arctic to the Himalayas, the phenomenon that is accelerating glacier melting | Resource Compilation (4.6) - Earth Science Final Project | Scoop.it
Industrial dust and soil, blown thousands of miles, settle on ice sheets and add to rising sea level threat
Brett Klinkner's insight:

Scientists theorize about the manmade pollution that is accelerating glacier melting and, in turn, rising sea level even further. “Increasing amounts of dust from bare soil, soot from fires and ultra-fine particles of "black carbon" from industry and diesel engines are being whipped up and deposited sometimes thousands of miles away.” Again, estimations of these trends in recent years are being proven naive by the real world happenings and evolution of glacial melting and its global implications. The albedo change from this melted ice over the past few years may have detrimental effects equivalent to the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere over the past quarter-century.


Vidal, John. "Dark Snow: From the Arctic to the Himalayas, the Phenomenon That Is Accelerating Glacier Melting." The Observer. Guardian News and Media, 06 July 2014. Web. <http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jul/05/dark-snow-speeding-glacier-melting-rising-sea-levels>.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brett Klinkner
Scoop.it!

Greenland Ice Sheet Melt Nearing Critical 'Tipping Point' | Climate Central

Greenland Ice Sheet Melt Nearing Critical 'Tipping Point' | Climate Central | Resource Compilation (4.6) - Earth Science Final Project | Scoop.it
In an indication that 2012 may be a record melt year for Greenland's ice sheet, data shows the reflectivity of the ice sheet is near a record low.
Brett Klinkner's insight:

Projections for Greenland’s ice sheet melt this year are transcending what has been seen in past as it is predicted to cover the country’s whole land mass. The rate of melting continues to accelerate past predicted figures from the past decade, becoming increasingly dangerous both locally and globally.


Freedman, Andrew. "Greenland Ice Sheet Melt Nearing Critical ‘Tipping Point’." Climate Central. N.p., 29 June 2012. Web. <http%3A%2F%2Fwww.climatecentral.org%2Fnews%2Fgreenland-ice-sheet-reflectivity-near-record-low-research-shows%2F>.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Brett Klinkner
Scoop.it!

Extreme Ice: VIDEO (via MATC Libraries online Click here to edit the title

Brett Klinkner's insight:

Renowned photojournalist James Balog's documentation centering on shrinking glaciers and rising sea levels in premiere global locales — epicenters of global climate change.

 

Balog, James, dir. "Extreme Ice." NOVA. PBS. 2009. Web. <http://ezproxy.madisoncollege.edu:2051/PortalViewVideo.aspx?xtid=44147>.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Brett Klinkner from Climate Change & The Cryosphere
Scoop.it!

July 2012 Greenland melt extent enhanced by low-level liquid clouds

more...
Brett Klinkner's curator insight, June 22, 2014 3:22 PM

This article explains the cause of some recently observed, significant outliers to sea level rise contributions. Across the summer of 2012, spanning nearly the entire Greenland ice sheet, there was a “historically rare period of extended surface melting.” This was found to be largely due to low-level “liquid clouds,” which increased near-surface temperatures by through their radiative effects. These clouds were thick enough and low enough to enhance infrared flux near the surface but also thin enough to allow “sufficient” solar radiation to pass through and raise surface temps above the melting point. These clouds are not uncommon over Greenland and across the Arctic, which makes these findings even more valuable, assisting the difficulties that global climate models have displayed which likely led from underestimation of these thin liquid clouds.

 

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v496/n7443/full/nature12002.html

 

Benartz, R. "July 2012 Greenland Melt Extent Enhanced by Low-level Liquid Clouds." Nature: International Weekly Journal Of Science. N.p., 3 Apr. 2013. Web. 22 June 2014. <http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nature.com%2Fnature%2Fjournal%2Fv496%2Fn7443%2Ffull%2Fnature12002.html>.