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Use of Tablet (iPad(®)) as a Tool for Teaching Anesthesiology in an Orthopedic Rotation.

Residents responded favorably to the introduction of an innovative iPad based curriculum for the orthopedic anesthesia rotation. More studies are needed to show how such mobile computing technologies can enhance learning, especially since residents work at multiple locations, have duty hour limits, and the need to document resident learning in six ACGME core competencies.


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Social Media use by US hospitals: the statistics

Social Media use by US hospitals: the statistics | Residency Development | Scoop.it

Walter van den Broek (@DrShock) summarizes the findings of a paper published in the Annals of Interval Medicine that presents a structured review of websites of 1,800 US hospitals focusing on their Facebook, Twitter and YouTube accounts:

* 21% use social media
* More likely to be large, urban hospitals run by nonprofit, nongovernment organisations
* More likely to participate in graduate medical education
* Use social media to target a general audience (97%)
* Provide content about the entire organization (93%)
* Announce news and events (91%)
* Further public relations (89%)
* Promote health (90%).

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Hospital study focuses on how social media is used by health care providers

Hospital study focuses on how social media is used by health care providers | Residency Development | Scoop.it

Only 21 percent of hospitals use social media. Those that were more likely to use social media included hospitals that were large, urban, or part of a health system; were run by nonprofit, nongovernment organizations; were involved in graduate medical education; or primarily treated children.

One of the most interesting parts of the study was noting how the hospitals were using social media. Most used it to target a general audience (97 percent), provide content about the entire organization (93 percent), announce news and events (91 percent), promote health (90 percent) and further public relations (89 percent). Researchers noted "most institutions use social media for unidirectional communication."

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The Role of Social Networking Web Sites in Influencing Residency Decisions

Context: Social networking Web sites such as Facebook have grown rapidly in popularity. It is unknown how such sites affect the ways in which medical trainees investigate and interact with graduate medical education (GME) programs.

 

 

Objective: To evaluate the use of social networking Web sites as a means for osteopathic medical students, interns, residents, and fellows to interact with GME programs and report the degree to which that interaction impacts a medical trainee's choice of GME program.

 

 

Methods: An anonymous, 10-item electronic survey on social networking Web sites was e-mailed to osteopathic medical student, intern, resident, and fellow members of the American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians. The weighted least squares test and the Fisher exact test were used for data analysis.

 

 

Results: A total of 9606 surveys were distributed, and 992 (10%) were completed. Nine hundred twenty-eight (93%) of the respondents used social networking Web sites, with the most popular services being Facebook (891 [90%]; P=.03), the Student Doctor Network (278 [28%]), and LinkedIn (89 [9%]; P=.03). Three hundred fifty-three respondents (36%; P=.52) were connected with a professional organization and 673 (68%; P=.73) used social networking Web sites for job searching related to GME programs or postresidency employment. Within the population of 497 third-, fourth-, and fifth-year osteopathic medical students, 136 (27%) reported gleaning information about programs through social networking Web sites (P=.01). Within the total population, 100 of 992 (10%) reported that this information influenced their decisions (P=.07). Of note, 144 (14%) of the total 992 respondents reported that the programs they applied to did not have any presence on social networking Web sites (P=.05).

 

 

Conclusion: Our results indicate that social networking Web sites have a present and growing influence on how osteopathic medical students, interns, residents, and fellows learn about and select a GME program.

 

Source: http://www.jaoa.org/content/112/10/673.short

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Why Baby Boomers and Millennials Make Great Teams

Why Baby Boomers and Millennials Make Great Teams | Residency Development | Scoop.it

The differing communication style of these two generations can prove to be an asset — if managed correctly.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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John Michel's curator insight, April 7, 2013 6:17 PM

Much has been written stereotyping both the millennial and baby-boomer generations, but the real insight lies in how they work together – if given the right environment.

Rim Riahi's curator insight, April 9, 2013 12:11 AM

The differing communication style of these two generations can prove to be an asset — if managed correctly.

 
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Residents using smartphones more than established docs

Residents using smartphones more than established docs | Residency Development | Scoop.it
The future of medicine is on smartphones, according to a new survey by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).

 

The group just surveyed 3,000 residents and found that while smartphone ownership rates are about the same for younger vs. older physicians (88 percent for residents, 78 percent for attending physicians), nearly 70 percent of residents are using their smartphones for clinical purposes, compared to just under 40 percent for physicians who have been in practice for 15 years or more.

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Doctors integrate iPads into practicing medicine

When one thinks of receiving medical attention, they don’t think of iPads. The saying “technology is the wave of the future” is true, though, and mobile technology is beginning to work into how doctors diagnose illnesses and talk to their patients.

 

To look at how mobile technology can be integrated into modern-day medicine, St. Mary’s Health Care System purchased iPads and loaned them to third-year medical clerkship students from the Georgia Health Sciences University/University of Georgia Medical Partnership (GHSU/UGA) campus and are collaborating with the University of Georgia’s College of Education on a yearlong study to see how iPads can be used in medical settings on a daily basis.

 

The research study began in July and will conclude on June 30, 2013. Over the last three months, the study included eight faculty physician preceptors at St. Mary’s and 36 third-year medical students from GHSU/UGA.

 

Michelle Nuss is the campus associate dean for graduate medical education at GHSU/UGA and is the principal investigator on a team created to study how faculty and students use the iPads.

The team presented its preliminary findings on Nov. 6 based of data collected since the study began. Initial research results showed that the majority of iPad users — both physicians and students — have embraced the use of iPads, and that patients have liked being able to see their own X-rays and lab results at their bedside.


Faculty reported using the iPads to teach while making rounds with medical students to see patients at St. Mary’s. Students reported using the iPads to gather data from EMR while on rounds, to make daily notes to prepare for the day, to study and for patient education, such as bringing up photos and diagrams on the iPad to show patients how an upcoming surgical procedure would be performed.

 

There are 10,000 medical apps available, a lot of them free, that medical staff can use to help them provide better health care to patients and to increase patients’ understanding about their health.

“You can talk to your patient and educate them,” Nuss said of patient education via the iPad. “The more the patient understands their disease, the more they’re going to be invested in getting better because they understand why it’s happening to them.”

 

Hospitals across the country have embraced iPads to help create a more efficient workflow for practitioners, and health care organizations now are beginning to integrate EMR with mobile devices so doctors can pull up e-scripts, lab and X-ray results at the patient’s bedside instead of collecting them from physical departments.

 

The other major part of the study is how the technology of the iPad helps medical professionals deliver a higher quality of care. An example is someone comes to the hospital and doctors find something in his or her bloodstream during tests. To know the best way to treat it, a doctor can look up the latest treatment options available through a medical resource, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or another evidence-based site, and determine the proper approach to treat the patient while standing bedside.


Via PEAS Healthcare, Parag Vora
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The New Medical Assistant: Studies Assess iPads in Medicine

The New Medical Assistant: Studies Assess iPads in Medicine | Residency Development | Scoop.it

The results of both classroom and practice-based studies are proving the iPad to be a valuable resource in medicine.

 

St. Mary’s Health Care System purchased iPads and loaned them to third-year medical clerkship students from the Georgia Health Sciences University/University of Georgia Medical Partnership (GHSU/UGA) campus and are collaborating with the University of Georgia’s College of Education on a yearlong study to see how iPads can be used in medical settings on a daily basis.

 

The study, which began in July of 2012, is set to conclude in June of 2013. Thus far, the study included eight faculty physician preceptors at St. Mary’s and 36 third-year medical students from GHSU/UGA.

 

“You can talk to your patient and educate them,” said Michelle Nuss, the campus associate dean for graduate medical education at GHSU/UGA. “The more the patient understands their disease, the more they’re going to be invested in getting better because they understand why it’s happening to them.”

 

Patient engagement in healthcare has been a big concern as the costs continue to skyrocket. The belief that patients taking an active role in their healthcare was a major contributing factor to the overhaul of Medicare/Medicaid reimbursement policy in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and will be put to the test as hospitals are measured on quality of care and outcomes, and paid accordingly.

 

“Showing patients their chest X-rays in real time and their lab results on the iPad, and I think engaging the patient more in their health care and making them more educated about their own problems, has been a big component of the study,” Nuss said.

 

Patients with better health literacy have been shown to make better decisions, and cost less than patients with low health literacy, so understanding the impact of educating the patient will be an equally important result of this study.

The study is unique, in that it tests not only the impact of mobile technology on delivery of healthcare, but also the impact it has on educating medical students in the classroom.

 


Via nrip, Mariano Fernandez S., Alfredo Calderón
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