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Focus and credibility will help academic blogs thrive but negative perceptions must be challenged.

Focus and credibility will help academic blogs thrive but negative perceptions must be challenged. | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

Whilst academic involvement in blogging is on the rise, it may not yet be considered standard academic practice. Many universities remain cautious due to perceived risks associated with lack of content control. Achilleas Kostoulas finds the openness and equality of blogs is fundamentally more democratic than other forms of scholarly debate. Here he reflects on some of the basic questions relating to why academic blog, what to blog about, how much time it realistically takes and pitfalls to avoid.

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The boundaries of academic blogging

The boundaries of academic blogging | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

Alex Marsh thinks of himself as a blogger who is an academic, rather than an “academic blogger”. He finds that though there is significant overlap, these two identities are not entirely congruent. ...


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Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, June 19, 2014 2:51 AM

I just scooped an invite to storytelling ... this is another (successful) story!

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Academic Blogging, a Personal Experience | Freakonometrics

Academic Blogging, a Personal Experience | Freakonometrics | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

I wanted to get back on two posts (one on Academic Blogging, and one on Twitter for Academics), and to update them based on the discussion that followed the panel (on Thanksgiving), as well as some more recent discussions. All comments are welcome !

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Le blogging académique, entre art et science | André Gunthert | L'Atelier des icônes

Le blogging académique, entre art et science | André Gunthert | L'Atelier des icônes | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

La micro-publication est un nouvel outil de la recherche. Et comme tous les nouveaux outils, elle bouscule le paysage existant. On peut adopter trois attitudes face à cette nouvelle donne. Soit l’ignorer, et continuer comme avant. Soit tenter de minimiser ces aspects dérangeants, pour les intégrer en produisant le moins de heurts. On peut aussi essayer de mieux comprendre en quoi les nouveaux usages interrogent les pratiques existantes, et pourquoi ils soulignent leurs limites.

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Three strikes and a blog: What to do with papers that are continually rejected

Three strikes and a blog: What to do with papers that are continually rejected | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

Getting your work published can be a frustrating process. Massive delays in publication and continual rejection may be all too common experiences but James Hartley argues this is no reason to let your scholarly work remain unseen. Blogs offer a great way to continue the momentum of your research and to find new audiences for work that may not appeal to the strict remit of academic publishers. 

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By opening up a distinctive space between academic research and journalism, a thriving academic blogosphere mediates between them

By opening up a distinctive space between academic research and journalism, a thriving academic blogosphere mediates between them | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

Mark Carrigan finds that academic blogging holds out the possibility of extending the role of the academic, rather than threatening its diminution. It allows for discoverability, less specialised communication, and a degree of space and freedom to extend beyond the realms of research.

How do you feel about academic blogging? If you are reading this then, chances are, you feel reasonably well inclined towards it. However if you are an academic blogger then you will undoubtedly be aware that many people are not so well inclined. This raises an obvious question: why? There are many different answers which could be given to this question. Most of which are grounded entirely in anecdotal evidence. This is an issue that is crying out for empirical research. But given its continued absence, I want to focus on one issue which I believe, on an entirely anecdotal basis, to be pertinent – does academic blogging dangerously blur the boundary between research and journalism?

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Read/Write Book - Ce que le blog apporte à la recherche - Antoine Blanchard

Read/Write Book - Ce que le blog apporte à la recherche -  Antoine Blanchard | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

En 2006, la chercheuse de l’université de Bergen (Norvège) Jill Walker Rettberg témoignait de sa (déjà) longue expérience du blog académique, en réfutant l’idée répandue selon laquelle le blog est un moyen de documenter la recherche1. Même si son blog lui a valu un prix de la Fondation Metzerk au titre de la « dissémination de la science »2, il lui sert plutôt à mener sa recherche. Elle écrit ainsi : « Research happens in blogs, and in the conversations between blogs. Blogs aren’t about documentation, they’re about doing, thinking and discussing. And they’re about catching fleeting thoughts and making them explicit. »

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Academic Blogs: Different Times for Science and Presentation of es.hypotheses.org - Medialab-Prado Madrid

Within the Empiria Digital encounters coordinated by Adolfo Estalella, we wish to dedicate an approach to scientific and academic blogs. In this seminar, we have invited several blog authors to share their blogging experiences and to reflect on the opportunity that blogs offer in the re-examination of some of the modes of producing within academia. The seminar will hold the presentation of Hypotheses.org, a platform for academic blogs written in Spanish, open to the academic communities of all the different disciplines pertaining to the Humanities and Social Sciences, supported by the French CNR, the University of Marseille and the University of Avignon. The seminar shares the same framework as Medialab-Prado's current reflexions concerning Digital Humanities and eResearch.

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Our Blogs, Ourselves - by Paul Krugman

Our Blogs, Ourselves - by Paul Krugman | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

The concern, or maybe just issue, is whether the rise of econoblogs is undermining the gatekeepers, whether any old Joe can now weigh in on economic debate, whereas in the good old days you had to publish in the journals, which meant getting through the refereeing process. My take is that the system never worked like that — or at least not in my professional lifetime. And when you consider how economic discussion actually used to work, you see the blogs in a different and more favorable light. ..


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Academic blogging on the rise

Term papers and response essays may soon be replaced by syllabi-mandated blog posts and comments, according to a recent article in The New York Times.

Professors in universities across the country have been calling for a radical reworking of the traditional term paper and formal essay structure. In the past few years, blog writing has become a requirement in some literature, business and even engineering courses.

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Five minutes with Bora Zivkovic: “The blog is a way for me to promote young and new voices, that’s why they call me The Blogfather!”

Five minutes with Bora Zivkovic: “The blog is a way for me to promote young and new voices, that’s why they call me The Blogfather!” | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

One of the best known science writers and bloggers in the online world, Bora Zivkovic is the chief editor and community manager of the Scientific American blogs network. Here he discusses his duty to encourage and promote new scientists, and the role of science communication in the 21st century.

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History News Network : The Cliopatria Awards, 2011

In conjunction with the AHA annual meeting in Chicago, here are the seventh annual Cliopatria Awards for History Blogging, including our inaugural awards for Best Twitter Feed and Best Podcast Episode. Thanks to the judges this year: Manan Ahmed, Kelly Baker, Jonathan Dresner, Mary Dudziak, Katrina Gulliver, Andrew Hartman, Brett Holman, Sharon Howard, Shane Landrum, Randall Stephens, Karen Tani, and David Weinfeld. They have done a fine job, making difficult decisions to choose the best work from strong fields. Here are the winners and brief explanations of the judges' rationale for their decisions...

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Multi-author academic blogs are the way of the future

Multi-author academic blogs are the way of the future | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

This week’s orgins post comes from Chris Gilson and Patrick Dunleavy the people behind the LSE British Politics and Policy Blog. To access British Politics and Policy at LSE please go to http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/.

The web gives academics an unparalleled opportunity to distribute their work to audiences previously unavailable to them. But in a period when government has announced that it is axing all public teaching funding for the social sciences, university social scientists are likely to find themselves stretched to the absolute limit. Who then will have the time and expertise to maintain their own individual blog?

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Why do academics blog? An analysis of audiences, purposes and challenges

Why do academics blog? An analysis of audiences, purposes and challenges | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it
(2013). Why do academics blog? An analysis of audiences, purposes and challenges. Studies in Higher Education: Vol. 38, The purposes of higher education: responses from a globalized world, pp. 1105-1119. doi: 10.1080/03075079.2013.835624

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Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, June 24, 2014 4:45 PM

AGAIN: blogging research. And this is a Scientific Journal's paper!

APIntd's curator insight, June 28, 2014 11:15 AM

à lire

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Academic blogging is part of a complex online academic attention economy, leading to unprecedented readership

Academic blogging is part of a complex online academic attention economy, leading to unprecedented readership | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

Given the far-reaching attention of their paper on the nature of academic blogging, Inger Mewburn and Pat Thomson find blogging is now part of a complex online ‘attention economy’ where social medi...


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Un angle mort ? Les infrastructures pour les SHS en général et pour les carnets de recherche en particulier

Un angle mort ? Les infrastructures pour les SHS en général et pour les carnets de recherche en particulier | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it
J'ai récemment organisé un panel sur le blogging scientifique (qu'on pourra appeler carnetage scientifique si on veut) au Forum mondial des sciences sociales, qui se tenait cette année à Montréal. ...
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The role of blogging in academia | by @freakonometrics on @hypothesesorg

The role of blogging in academia | by @freakonometrics on @hypothesesorg | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

In a few days, I will participate to a panel discussion in Montréal, chaired by Marin Dacos, entitled  “Minor forms of academic communication: revamping the relationship between science and society?“, at the World Social Science Forum. I do not have much expertise  (compared with colleagues involved in the panel) even if I frequently observe the community of academic bloggers, and I regularly interact with some of them. For this panel discussion, Marin asked me to share my experience, as an academic blogger. So, let’s try to describe the Freakonometrics adventure…

The origins: why and how the blog started?The practice: how do I blog?The future: why is it still worth blogging, in academia?

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From Tweet to Blog Post to Peer-Reviewed Article: How to be a Scholar Now

From Tweet to Blog Post to Peer-Reviewed Article: How to be a Scholar Now | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

Digital media is changing how scholars interact, collaborate, write and publish. Here, Jessie Daniels describes how to be a scholar now, when peer-reviewed articles can begin as Tweets and blog posts. In this new environment, scholars are able to create knowledge in ways that are more open, more fluid, and more easily read by wider audiences.

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luiy's curator insight, September 26, 2013 11:56 AM

Digital media is changing how scholars interact, collaborate, write and publish. Here,Jessie Daniels describes how to be a scholar now, when peer-reviewed articles can begin as Tweets and blog posts. In this new environment, scholars are able to create knowledge in ways that are more open, more fluid, and more easily read by wider audiences.

Digital media is changing how I do my work as a scholar. How I work today bares little resemblance to the way I was trained as a scholar, but has everything to do with being fluid with both scholarship and digital technologies.  To illustrate what I mean by this, I describe the process behind a recent article of mine that started with a Tweet at an academic conference, then became a blog post, then a series of blog posts, and was eventually an article in a peer-reviewed journal.

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The Ultimate Guide to The Use of Blogs in Teaching

The Ultimate Guide to The Use of Blogs in Teaching | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

1- What is Blogging ?
2- Difference between A Blog and a Website
3- Free Blogging Platforms for Teachers and Students
4- How to set up a blog
5-Things to Pay Heed to when Setting up a Classroom Blog
6- Blogging Tips for Teachers
7- Advantages of Blogging in Education
8- Ways Teachers Can Use Blogs in their Classrooms
9- Examples of Successful Student, Class, and Teacher Blogs


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Balancing Jane: 5 Ways Blogging Has Made Me a Better Scholar

Balancing Jane: 5 Ways Blogging Has Made Me a Better Scholar | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

For a long time, I didn't tell anyone I knew that I blogged, even after I started getting some pretty steady readers. It's not like I was saying anything on my blog that I wouldn't be willing to talk about in real life (in case you haven't noticed, I'm not a particularly secretive person), but I did worry about how blogging might be perceived, especially by people who were both in my personal and professional circles. Would being a blogger make me seem like less of a scholar? Would I seem less serious?

When I finally decided to take the plunge and let people I actually know see my blog, it was partly because I figured out that blogging--whether it was evident to other people or not--actually made me a better scholar. Here's how.

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ScienceSeeker - Science news from science newsmakers

ScienceSeeker - Science news from science newsmakers | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

ScienceSeeker collects posts from science blogs around the world, so you can find the latest science news and discussion on any topic.

Current blog count: 928

Are you a science blogger?
Submit your blog today.

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Five minutes with Patrick Dunleavy and Chris Gilson: “Blogging is quite simply, one of the most important things that an academic should be doing right now”

Five minutes with Patrick Dunleavy and Chris Gilson: “Blogging is quite simply, one of the most important things that an academic should be doing right now” | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

Ahead of the launch of EUROPP – an academic blog investigating matters of European politics and policy – next week, Patrick Dunleavy and Chris Gilson discuss social scientists’ obligation to spread their research to the wider world and how blogging can help academics break out of restrictive publishing loops.

LSE’s Public Policy Group already run two academic blogs and you are preparing to launch two more in the coming months. Yet many academics are still sceptical about the value of blogging. What is it that gives you so much confidence in academic blogging as a means of dissemination and engagement?

 

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I’m having a blogsistential crisis! I am a blogger. And I am an academic. But am I an academic blogger?

I’m having a blogsistential crisis! I am a blogger. And I am an academic. But am I an academic blogger? | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

Lynne Murphy‘s blog began life as a ‘limbering up exercise’ before she wrote work for peer-review. A somewhat accidental academic blogger, she notes that her online presence has become part of her professional profile… even if it occassionally serves as a distraction. Lynne also questions whether she is working for the University when she blogs, but doubts a future model of higher education that involves timetabling blog time for academics.

I’m not sure that I would have agreed to write a post for the LSE Impact blog if I had known that it would send me into the depths of a blogsistential crisis. But here I am: I am a blogger. I am a successful blogger, even. And I am an academic. But am I an academic blogger?

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Usage des médias sociaux en sciences sociales - Social Media Lab (Canada)

Le Social Media Lab (Canada) a récemment mené une étude pour découvrir si, comment et pourquoi les chercheurs se servent des nouveaux médias pour communiquer et diffuser les connaissances. En particulier, l’étude s’est intéressée à la façon dont les chercheurs en sciences sociales utilisent ces outils dans leur vie professionnelle, et les implications que cela pourrait avoir sur l’avenir des pratiques de communication et d’édition savante. Le sondage en ligne a recueilli les réponses de 367 chercheurs principalement en sciences sociales (79%), travaillant aux Etats-Unis, au Canada et en Grande-Bretagne. Elle met en évidence les résultats suivants...

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Should you enter the academic blogosphere? A discussion on whether scholars should take the time to write a blog about their work

Should you enter the academic blogosphere? A discussion on whether scholars should take the time to write a blog about their work | Réseaux sociaux scientifiques | Scoop.it

While the blogosphere has always included sites by students, professors, librarians, administrators and other university members, more scholars are now tying their blogs to their work-related activities and making the connection between online presence and career development. Melonie Fullick discusses the advantages and disadvantages of scholars taking the time to write a blog about their work.

Academic blogs by definition tend to focus on professional rather than personal topics, showing explicit connections between blog content, research issues and academic life. However, blogging is not viewed positively by all members of the academic community, and recent exchanges online reflect the controversial position of blogging in a new debate emerging around the issues of open access to research, public scholarship and expert knowledge.

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