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8 Questions Answered By Popular Social Networks - Edudemic

8 Questions Answered By Popular Social Networks - Edudemic | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
The number of popular social networks may seem overwhelming. We can share links, ideas, comments, jokes, pictures and everything else, and new social media options seem to pop-up everyday.
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InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools
Helping learners perform more meaningful research
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IFLA -- Real Solutions to Fake News: How Libraries Help

IFLA -- Real Solutions to Fake News: How Libraries Help | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
Real Solutions to Fake News: How Libraries Help
Joyce Valenza's insight:
Useful international resources from #ifla2017
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The Distracted Classroom: Transparency, Autonomy, and Pedagogy

The Distracted Classroom: Transparency, Autonomy, and Pedagogy | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Joyce Valenza's insight:
Strategies for engaging

 
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 9, 2:23 PM
Well used tools can benefit teaching and learning. A key here might be the autonomy students experience, which can lead to them being responsible for their learning.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, August 24, 4:38 AM
The Distracted Classroom: Transparency, Autonomy, and Pedagogy
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63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World

63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Joyce Valenza's insight:
Terry compiles a great list. 
 
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Joyce Valenza's curator insight, July 20, 8:53 AM
A great list I'd like to play with to frame for TLs
 
GwynethJones's curator insight, July 20, 12:25 PM

All the buzz you need to know! But not ALL you need to do, just pick your Top 5 then tackle more!

Ines Bieler's curator insight, July 20, 2:09 PM

All the buzz you need to know! But not ALL you need to do, just pick your Top 5 then tackle more!

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Opinion: Forget “digital natives.” Here’s how kids are really using the Internet

Opinion: Forget “digital natives.” Here’s how kids are really using the Internet | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
By challenging the assumption that every child growing up today is a one-size-fits all digital native, we can make sure each of them can find their own way to relate to technology — whether using it to accomplish basic tasks or to create new technologies and worlds. Being aware of our kids’ differences now is what could help keep them from drifting apart.

Via Nik Peachey
Joyce Valenza's insight:
Challenging Prensky, an interesting alternate taxonomy of young tech users.
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Chris Carter's comment, July 5, 9:37 PM
A much more nuanced view, and one that I appreciate. I have long called so-called digital natives "digital naives" because the majority of kids only know enough about tech to use it to accomplish what they wish to accomplish. Tech does not really come any easier for them. Tech is simply more common to them.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, July 6, 5:17 AM
Opinion: Forget “digital natives.” Here’s how kids are really using the Internet
Edward Russell's curator insight, July 7, 10:51 AM
beyond these over-simplified tags. this distinction is always interesting, as is how young people actually use tech.
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An Update to the Upgraded KWL for the 21st Century

An Update to the Upgraded KWL for the 21st Century | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
In 2011, I wrote a blog post, titled Upgrade your KWL Chart to the 21st Century. It described how I learned about a new version of the traditional KWL (What do I Know, What do I Want to know and wh...

Via Beth Dichter, Linda Buckmaster,  Derrall Garrison
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Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, June 13, 2015 1:14 AM

What other tools and activities would you include and organise according to the KWHLAQ chart? !

Tony Guzman's curator insight, June 15, 2015 2:44 PM

This article shares an updated version of KWL (What do I Know, What do I Want to know and what have I Learned). How many use this in their classrooms?

Ellen Dougherty's curator insight, August 1, 2015 11:49 AM

Check out this new version of the KWL chart by Silvia Rosenthal Tomlison. What we once called KWL is now the KWHLAQ.

* K stands for  'What do you KNOW?'

* W stands for 'What do you WANT to know?'

* H stands for 'HOW will you find out?'

* L stands for 'What have your LEARNED?'

* A stands for 'What ACTION will you take?'

* Q stands for 'What further QUESTIONS do you have?'

This new visual also includes suggestions under each category to help students make their "thinking and learning visible." For more information click through to the post.

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What are literacy skills?

What are literacy skills? | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
Literacy skills help students gain knowledge through reading as well as using media and technology. These skills also help students create knowledge through writing as well as developing media and technology.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 13, 5:02 PM

Literacy skills help students gain knowledge through reading as well as using media and technology. These skills also help students create knowledge through writing as well as developing media and technology.

Information Literacy

Students need to be able to work effectively with information, using it at all levels of Bloom's Taxonomy (remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating). Information literacy involves traditional skills such as reading, researching, and writing; but new ways to read and write have also introduced new skills:

  • Consuming information: The current excess of information requires students to gain new skills in handling it. When most information came through official publications like books, newspapers, magazines, and television shows, students encountered data that had been prepared by professionals. Now, much information is prepared by amateurs. Some of that work is reliable, but much is not. Students must take on the role of the editor, checking and cross-checking information, watching for signs of bias, datedness, and errors. Students need to look at all information as the product of a communication situation, with a sender, subject, purpose, medium, receiver, and context.
  • Producing information: In the past, students were mostly consumers of information. When they produced information, it was largely for a single reader—the teacher—and was produced for a grade. It was therefore not an authentic communication situation, and students felt that writing was a purely academic activity. Now writing is one of the main ways students communicate. It has real-world applications and consequences. Students need to understand that what they write can do great good or great harm in the real world, and that how they write determines how powerful their words are. Students need to take on the role of professional writers, learning to be effective and ethical producers of information.

Media Literacy

Media literacy involves understanding the many ways that information is produced and distributed. The forms of media have exploded in the last decade and new media arrive every day:

- See more at: https://k12.thoughtfullearning.com/FAQ/what-are-literacy-skills#sthash.Ck95Ibcv.dpuf

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Media+Literacy

 

 

Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, March 13, 5:55 PM
A good description of each of the literacies that are needed to ensure our students are fully engaged when researching. 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 22, 2:39 AM
Information and media literacy
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Critical Digital Literacy Explained for Teachers

Critical Digital Literacy Explained for Teachers | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
December, 2014
Critical digital literacy is one of the essential required competencies for the 21st century educator. In an era of unprecedented personal publishing, infobesity (information obesity)...

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
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Gemma Ballarín's curator insight, March 4, 3:23 PM
Critical Digital Literacy
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 8, 1:34 AM
Critical Digital Literacy Explained for Teachers
Encarna Llamas's curator insight, March 11, 3:55 AM
Pensamiento crítico y TICs

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LibGuides: Fake News: Home

LibGuides: Fake News: Home | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
How to identify and avoid fake news
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Nancy Jones's curator insight, December 31, 2016 11:35 AM
this is a handy little visual to use not only with Fake news, the seeming latest topic to get lots of coverage, but also for chec king out all resources o nline.
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Fill Your Child's Digital Backpack

Fill Your Child's Digital Backpack | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it

Today's kids need digital skills to be successful in school and beyond. Help them to develop a healthy relationship with technology by teaching them to use it wisely and appropriately for both schoolwork and fun.


Via Nik Peachey
Joyce Valenza's insight:

Articles and resources to share with students of all ages.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 25, 2015 4:56 AM

Good place to find age appropriate digital tools.

Christine Rounsevell's curator insight, August 26, 2015 1:01 AM

Some great resources in this post. Good site as well.

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Skills and Strategies | Fake News vs. Real News: Determining the Reliability of Sources

Skills and Strategies | Fake News vs. Real News: Determining the Reliability of Sources | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
How do you know if something you read is true? Why should you care? This roundup of tools, questions, activities and case studies can help reduce “digital naïveté.”
Joyce Valenza's insight:

Great fodder for media literacy instruction!

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5 Proven Ways to Be Persuasive With Presentations

5 Proven Ways to Be Persuasive With Presentations | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it

Via José Carlos
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José Carlos's curator insight, July 22, 2015 4:10 PM

Take it from TED Talks: The most successful presentations are about 65% stories and 25% figures, with the remainder an explanation of your credibility.

Anita Vance's curator insight, August 14, 2015 8:34 AM

I like the way this is written, divided and supported with examples to make this an easily reviewed article for planning purposes.

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USE, UNDERSTAND & CREATE: A Digital Literacy Framework for Canadian Schools | MediaSmarts

USE, UNDERSTAND & CREATE: A Digital Literacy Framework for Canadian Schools | MediaSmarts | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
In this section, teachers can access digital literacy classroom resources aligned with curriculum outcomes set out by their province or territory.

Via Karen Bonanno
Joyce Valenza's insight:

Rich curricular content from Canada on six key aspects of digital literacy.

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Movers shakers & policy makers - Carol Dweck, author, professor of psychology | #GrowthMindset #ModernEDU

Movers shakers & policy makers - Carol Dweck, author, professor of psychology | #GrowthMindset #ModernEDU | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
What would you say are a few of the biggest myths about growth mindset?

OK, myth No.1 is the myth that it’s all about effort, and that you instil it by praising effort. Effort is one factor that leads to learning. So the ultimate value is growth, progress, learning. And effort is one thing that leads there but there are many other things – strategies, using resources, getting advice, guidance and mentorship, and when people leave that out and just praise effort, it’s not transmitting a growth mindset. Adults have nagged children for centuries to try harder. That’s not a growth mindset, it’s an adult nagging a child to try harder!

Also, we find that when teachers think it’s just about effort and praising effort they may praise effort that isn’t even there, or that’s not effective. So if a child tries hard at something and you say ‘great job, you tried hard’, but they didn’t make progress, they didn’t advance, you’re actually conveying a fixed mindset because you’re saying ‘great effort, I didn’t really expect you to do that, and I don’t expect you to do that, so I’m trying to make you feel good about not doing it’. So we need people to understand that it’s appreciating a variety of process variables that lead to learning.

The second myth is that you can teach students a lesson on growth mindset and put a poster up in the front of the room, and that’s that, that they will have a growth mindset from then on. And we know if the teacher doesn’t then embody a growth mindset, if teachers don’t embody growth mindsets in their teaching practices, in the way that they give feedback when the child is stuck, and the way they present a new unit, in the way that they give opportunities for revision and growth of understanding – if they don’t embody that growth mindset, they are not teaching it. And in fact, if their behaviour contradicts the poster at the front of the room, then maybe they’re doing a disservice.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=carol+dweck

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Growth+Mindset

 


Via Gust MEES
Joyce Valenza's insight:
An interview with Dr. Dweck that offers insights and counters myths.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 14, 1:41 PM
Carol Dweck outlines several myths about the pychology of a growth mindset.
Ian Berry's curator insight, August 14, 7:15 PM
Great reminders of several aspects what I call appreciative leadership.  "Effort is one factor that leads to learning. So the ultimate value is growth, progress, learning. And effort is one thing that leads there but there are many other things – strategies, using resources, getting advice, guidance and mentorship, and when people leave that out and just praise effort, it’s not transmitting a growth mindset."
Chris Carter's curator insight, August 14, 7:31 PM
Carol Dweck gave words and concrete research to the belief that kids can succeed, that hard work matters, and that being "smart" has more to do with focus and determination than genes. 
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Teaching 21st Century Skills For 21st Century Success Requires An Ecosystem Approach | #eSkills #ICT

Teaching 21st Century Skills For 21st Century Success Requires An Ecosystem Approach | #eSkills #ICT | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
It is almost universally acknowledged that in order to succeed in the 21st century, students must learn much more than the “three Rs” and basic computer competency.

 

The term “21st century skills” is used often in educational circles to refer to a range of abilities and competencies that go beyond what has traditionally been taught in the classroom, including problem solving, communication, collaboration, creativity and innovation. Others define the term as “information literacy, media literacy, and information, communication and technology literacy.”

 

More importantly, students need these skills because employers across a huge variety of industries increasingly demand them. A recent McKinsey report indicated that close to 40 percent of employers could not find people with the right skills while 60 percent “complain[ed] of a lack of preparation.” Even jobs that were once considered vocational, such as welding, petroleum production, and even factory work, are now high tech, and require specialized knowledge that includes not only a robust science background and familiarity with the computerized machinery that keeps heavy industry humming, but also critical thinking and collaboration skills. In other words, 21st century job growth is outpacing our ability to develop a prepared workforce, making it more critical than ever to teach these skills.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/10/29/if-i-would-own-a-company-what-skills-would-i-expect-from-my-workers-in-21st-century/

 


Via Gust MEES
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tina miller's curator insight, July 20, 7:32 AM
communication

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, July 25, 6:02 AM
Teaching 21st Century Skills For 21st Century Success Requires An Ecosystem Approach
Chris Carter's curator insight, July 25, 7:05 PM
I am convinced now that we cannot "put new wine into old wineskins." We need to fundamentally rethink how we conceptualize "school." Bolting on new parts to the old system runs into the problem of the inertia of the old. There is so much to say here. We came into the 21st Century with a model of education that is, practically speaking, a "production" model where teachers stay in front of students and their productivity is measures by hours in front of students multiplied by number of students. The more hours and the more students, the more productive. My school is willing to explore a new paradigm, one in which teaching is modeling how to learn and guiding students toward a lifetime and lifestyle of learning . Such a mindset naturally leads to relational approaches. It is no so much about the numbers, but about learners seeing teachers as learners and learning "guild" leaders, too.
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Sharing a Great Resource and Techniques for Web Content Fact Checking | Emerging Education Technologies

Sharing a Great Resource and Techniques for Web Content Fact Checking | Emerging Education Technologies | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
If you can't find anything about the information you seek to assess on any of the fact checker sites, then the next suggestion is to “go upstream”. That is, try to identify the original source of the information and consider its validity. This is where things really get going – the first technique is helpful and convenient, but this one is more fundamental.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 13, 7:50 AM

Some really useful techniques.

Ines Bieler's curator insight, July 13, 8:50 AM

Some really useful techniques.

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The Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet [Infographic]

The Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet [Infographic] | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it

"Critical thinking skills truly matter in learning. Why? Because they are life skills we use every day of our lives. Everything from our work to our recreational pursuits, and all that’s in between, employs these unique and valuable abilities. Consciously developing them takes thought-provoking discussion and equally thought-provoking questions to get it going. Begin right here with the Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet.


It’s a simple infographic offering questions that work to develop critical thinking on any given topic. Whenever your students discover or talk about new information, encourage them to use these questions for sparking debate and the sharing of opinions and insights among each other. Together they can work at building critical thinking skills in a collaborative and supportive atmosphere."


Via John Evans
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Jeannette Delamoir's curator insight, May 21, 7:26 PM
Another great tool for strengthening students' critical thinking. (Thanks, Kris, that's two great sources from your selection!)
Nguyet Vi Truong (Rose)'s curator insight, May 24, 8:25 AM
A great thought-provoking questions to create critical thinking 
Samantha's curator insight, June 1, 9:50 AM
Critical thinking is an essential skill, and the journalistic question are always a great way (and subject) on which to practice critical thinking. I really appreciate how detailed this outline is. I would love to make a poster of it. It is exactly the sort of thing I would love to have up in the classroom, as a guide for me as well as my students.
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Librarians and teachers - How to make an information literacy framework work for you.

Librarians and teachers - How to make an information literacy framework work for you. | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
An information literacy framework is the building block of skills that every student needs to become competent in todays world of information overload. It is the set of skills that ensures that every student becomes independent learners and critical thinkers. So why do we not already have one in every school? Is it a lack of understanding of what information literacy is? Is it because we think that Google can answer everything? Is it because we believe that all students can already do this? I truly have no idea, but over the last few years it has become apparent that although students are very competent at using technology their ability to research has not changed from the time that we only had books and if anything it has become worse.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
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3 Fast, Free Lesson Plans to Fight Fake News

The fake news epidemic is disturbing. How do we fight it? Well, we can take a hint from how the medical community fights the flu or any other virus. We inoculate ourselves. In this post, I’ll teach you how I teach about fake news. Just as the flu shot exposes a person to enough of the […]
Joyce Valenza's insight:
Engaging, relevant instruction from Vicki Davis
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Lesson plan: How to teach your students about fake news | Lesson Plan | PBS NewsHour Extra

Lesson plan: How to teach your students about fake news |  Lesson Plan | PBS NewsHour Extra | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
Fake news is making news, and it's a problem. This lesson gives students media literacy skills they need to navigate the media, including how to spot fake news.
Joyce Valenza's insight:
A great lesson idea from PBS NewsHour!
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Nancy Jones's curator insight, December 31, 2016 11:32 AM
Thanks Joyce Valenza for sharing and PBS for sharing. Seems like this media literacy will become even more important a we roll into 2017
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Think Outside the Box When Creating Your Next Presentation Deck

Think Outside the Box When Creating Your Next Presentation Deck | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
How literary devices -- the tools we use to tell stories -- can help you find the best images for your presentation deck.

Via Baiba Svenca
Joyce Valenza's insight:
Some inspirational tips for presos.
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Nancy Jones's curator insight, May 27, 2016 8:55 AM
Thoughtful article to help you think outside the box with your images and style of presentation.
Nancy Jones's curator insight, December 31, 2016 11:33 AM
Love this. I think we ALL need to revisit presentation skills and what can engage an audience. I am working on that with my 6th graders.
Martha Bongiorno's curator insight, January 2, 8:49 AM
Clean and appealing!
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MIT App Inventor | Explore MIT App Inventor

MIT App Inventor | Explore MIT App Inventor | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it

MIT App Inventor is a blocks-based programming tool that enables everyone, even novices, to learn programming and build fully functional apps for Android devices. Newcomers to App Inventor can have their first app up and running in an hour or less, and can program more complex apps in significantly less time than with more traditional, text-based languages.


Via Nik Peachey
Joyce Valenza's insight:

Can't wait to try this with students.

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elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, September 4, 2015 3:22 AM

Un outil à explorer pour créer ses propres App sous Android ... A tester

Monia Sannia's curator insight, February 25, 2016 9:41 AM

An easy tool to build your own app.

Craig Van Ham's curator insight, March 24, 2016 9:03 PM

Great tool to get your students making their own apps.

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Biteable Free Video Maker Software

Biteable Free Video Maker Software | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it

Via Baiba Svenca
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GwynethJones's curator insight, October 10, 2015 1:24 PM

Confession: I'm really BAD at iMovie! I used to be OK, but then it changed. My kiddos are AWESOME! So they do it for me! [hangs head in shame] My DAD is Awesome at it, too! I just don't have the patience! It takes SOooooo long!


1 min of iMovie = 1 hour of Editing -- or MORE!

Is this the answer?

jp Marcheix's curator insight, November 2, 2015 6:26 AM

Un nouvel outil pour du videotelling...

véronique valentino's curator insight, November 11, 2015 6:03 AM

Un autre outil (URL vérifiée sur VirrusTotal), pour créer des vidéos gratuitement.

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Why I focus on #DigitalLeadership Instead of Cyberbullying

Why I focus on #DigitalLeadership Instead of Cyberbullying | InformationFluencyTransliteracyResearchTools | Scoop.it
When we constantly talk to kids about cyberbullying, what ideas are we putting into their heads? We have a constant focus on "here is what you can't do"" as opposed to here is what you can do? For ...
Joyce Valenza's insight:

An important message. An inspiring video.

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Linda Offt's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:13 AM

An important message. An inspiring video.

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How to pick powerful stories

How to pick powerful stories for your presentation

Via José Carlos
Joyce Valenza's insight:

Very powerful tips for personalizing communication and sharing emotion!

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Fausto Cantu's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:42 AM

Cómo escoger historias poderosas

Joanne Schmidt's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:13 AM

helpful hints for any storytelling, using digital tools or not

may be used for Attic Archeology projects and/or TED club