Research publications
0 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Michele Morrison
Scoop.it!

Open Access Explained! - PHD Animation

What is open access? Nick Shockey and Jonathan Eisen take us through the world of open access publishing and explain just what it's all about. Make sure to w...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michele Morrison from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

Open Access To Research: An Ideal Complicated By Reality | Forbes

Open Access To Research: An Ideal Complicated By Reality | Forbes | Research publications | Scoop.it

Next month a new Obama-administration policy will give the public greater access to research funded by the federal government.  This is good news for the scientific community as well as the general public—but not all university-based research is covered by the new policy, and some of it presents far more complex transparency issues.

 

Announced last February, the memo from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy requires federal agencies that spend over $100 million annually supporting research and development to make the results of that (non-classified) research, as well as the underlying data, available to the public within a year of publication. The one-year period allows publishers of scientific journals time to retain their rights and make money.

 

As researchers around the world gain faster and more complete access to the work of their colleagues, the pace of scientific progress will increase and so will the benefits to society in areas like the economy, healthcare, and energy. It’s also clear to us that taxpayers, scientists or not, deserve access to the information their support has generated.

 

Research universities applaud the new policy and are actively involved in devising ways to comply. A group of academic organizations (the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, and the Association of Research Libraries) has proposed a system in which “universities will collaborate with the federal government and others to host cross-institutional digital repositories” of research publications.

 

Such a system would add to the ways many researchers already share their data. The Internet e-Print Archive, known as arXiv, was created by Cornell professor Paul Ginsparg more than twenty years ago to enable physicists to share research results even before publication. Today, with at least half a million articles, arXiv is an essential source of free information for physicists, mathematicians, computer scientists, and others—including many in developing countries who have limited access to expensive journals.

 

But the research covered by the new policy is not the only kind that is conducted at universities. Other kinds—primarily government-funded classified research and some industry-sponsored research—do not always appear in scientific publications and are sometimes at odds with the ideal of transparency and open communication of knowledge, an ideal that runs deep in the traditions of academic communities. That ideal, and the fear of political interference, are among the reasons that many universities, including Cornell, decline federal grants for classified research.

 

Industry contracts are another matter. Faced with budgetary pressures and constrained federal support, universities and their faculty increasingly rely on industry funding for some research projects. But industries’ proprietary interests in commercializing research results with a patent or new product often promote a degree of secrecy. There are ways to mitigate this concern, but it is real and can run counter to the academic ethos and the public good.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michele Morrison from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Impact factor: researchers should define the metrics that matter to them

Impact factor: researchers should define the metrics that matter to them | Research publications | Scoop.it

One of the challenges faced by research funders – both public and private – is how to maximise the amount of work being done on important problems, without institutionalising any particular dogma which may suppress novel ideas. The most common arrangement is to fund good researchers but refrain from being overly prescriptive about outcomes, and, in turn, the way to identify good researchers has been to look at the publications that follow the research they fund.

 

In 1955, Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information (now part of Thomson Reuters), introduced a means for identifying influential journals according to the number of times work appearing in them was cited. This process results in a number called the impact factor (IF), and it's build on the assumption that those whose works have been the most influential will be the most cited.

 

However, as anyone who's compared the Twitter following of, say, pop singer Rihanna to astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson knows, influence is only one dimension of importance. While useful for many (pre-digital) years, the IF system, not unlike some celebrities, is not aging gracefully. Not only has it been widely misapplied, it has also had some unintended side effects.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michele Morrison
Scoop.it!

Incentives for researchers drive up publication output - University World News

Incentives for researchers drive up publication output - University World News | Research publications | Scoop.it
Incentives for researchers drive up publication output University World News Vice-rector for Research and Innovation Professor Eugene Cloete said research publications were exceptionally important: “They are a critical contribution to extending the...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Michele Morrison from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

Open-access journals: a perspective from within

Open-access journals: a perspective from within | Research publications | Scoop.it
There’s an ongoing debate in the world of academic publishing about whether the public should be allowed open access to research publications we all pay for in the first place.“If we are paying for this…...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.