Research on Battery Technologies
6.2K views | +1 today
Follow
 
Scooped by LabRat
onto Research on Battery Technologies
Scoop.it!

Electrovaya German subsidiary Litarion begins insolvency proceedings

Electrovaya Inc. announced that its wholly-owned German subsidiary, Litarion GmbH ("Litarion"), has commenced a voluntary structured insolvency process (similar to bankruptcy proceedings in the US) that is expected to result in the appointment of a provisional receiver/liquidator of Litarion and its property by the German court. As reported i
LabRat's insight:
While current circumstances on the ground in Germany dictated Litarion enter into this process, Electrovaya believes that it ultimately no longer needs its own contract manufacturing facilities and, given alternate supply arrangements is in place, it expects that the proceedings will not impact its ability to continue to fulfil current and future customer orders for its customized cells, custom modules and battery systems. As previously disclosed, large battery orders from Litarion’s OEM partners and other customers have taken longer than expected to materialize. As a result, the cost of maintaining Litarion’s substantial infrastructure negatively affected Electrovaya’s financial results and liquidity position. The Litarion insolvency process is expected to substantially reduce Electrovaya’s overhead.
more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

BMW Group and Daimler AG agree to combine mobility services into new JV

BMW Group and Daimler AG agree to combine mobility services into new JV | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
The BMW Group and Daimler AG have signed an agreement to merge their mobility services business units. Subject to examination and approval by the responsible competition authorities, the BMW Group and Daimler AG plan to combine and strategically expand their existing on-demand mobility offering in the areas of CarSharing
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

MIT-led team devises new approach to designing solid ion conductors; implications for high-energy solid-state batteries

MIT-led team devises new approach to designing solid ion conductors; implications for high-energy solid-state batteries | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
Researchers led by a team from MIT, with colleagues from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), BMW Group, and Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a fundamentally new approach to alter ion mobility and stability against oxidation of lithium ion conductors—a key component of rechargeable batteries—using lattice dynamics. The ne
LabRat's insight:
A variety of promising solid ion conductors exist, but none is stable when in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes in lithium-ion batteries, Shao-Horn says. Therefore, seeking new solid ion conductors that have both high ion conductivity and stability is critical. Sorting through the many different structural families and compositions to find the most promising ones is a classic needle-in-a-haystack problem. That’s where the new design principle comes in. The idea is to find materials that have ion conductivity comparable to that of liquids, but with the long-term stability of solids. The team asked, “What is the fundamental principle? What are the design principles on a general structural level that govern the desired properties?” Shao-Horn says. A combination of theoretical analysis and experimental measurements has now yielded some answers, the researchers say. We realized that there are a lot of materials that could be discovered, but no understanding or common principle that allows us to rationalize the discovery process. We came up with an idea that could encapsulate our understanding and predict which materials would be among the best. —Sokseiha Muy, lead author The key was to look at the lattice properties of these solid materials’ crystalline structures. This governs how vibrations such as waves of heat and sound—phonons—pass through materials. This new way of looking at the structures turned out to allow accurate predictions of the materials’ actual properties. Once the vibrational frequency of a given material is known, it can be used to predict new chemistry or to explain experimental results, Shao-Horn says. The researchers observed a good correlation between the lattice properties determined using the model and the lithium ion conductor material’s conductivity. They found, in particular, that the vibrational frequency of lithium itself can be fine-tuned by tweaking its lattice structure, using chemical substitution or dopants to subtly change the structural arrangement of atoms. The new concept can now provide a powerful tool for developing new, better-performing materials that could lead to dramatic improvements in the amount of power that could be stored in a battery of a given size or weight, as well as improved safety, the researchers say. Already, they used the method to find some promising candidates. The techniques could also be adapted to analyze materials for other electrochemical processes such as solid-oxide fuel cells, membrane based desalination systems, or oxygen-generating reactions. The work was supported by BMW, the National Science Foundation, and the US Department of Energy.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

GM researchers posit simple model to assist in balancing high energy density vs fast charging in EV design

GM researchers posit simple model to assist in balancing high energy density vs fast charging in EV design | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
With an eye toward balancing higher energy density batteries and fast charging capability, General Motors researchers Mark Verbrugge and Charles Wampler have derived and implemented a simple model to assist in evaluating factors such as cell performance, cost, life, and fast-charge capability in the design of electric vehicles.
LabRat's insight:
In a paper published in the Journal of Power Sources, they suggest that their approach is useful in terms of comparing and contrasting battery systems and shedding light on technological tradeoffs. We are at a crossroads in terms of balancing two promising technologies: (1) higher energy density (Wh/L) and specific energy (Wh/kg) batteries, relative to today’s conventional graphite/metal-oxide lithium ion systems, and (2) fast-charge capability, defined here as greater than Level 2 charging, or greater than about 20 kW. Currently in the United States, conventional Level 2 charging of 6.6 kW is available in homes and various community locations. In the ideal case, high energy batteries would be able to accommodate fast charge, but two of the most promising high-energy cell technologies, i.e., cells employing Si-enhanced or Li-metal negative electrodes, are problematic insofar as they cannot at present accept fast charging without significant degradation in cell life. … The tradeoff between high-energy, as provided by cells with Li-Si and Li metal negative electrodes, and fast-charge capability, which can be obtained from conventional lithium ion cells employing lithiated graphite or titanate negative electrodes, for examples, poses a dilemma in the design of electric vehicles (EVs). —Verbrugge and Wampler For their analysis, Verbrugge and Wampler considered costs associated with the cells, added mass due to the use of larger batteries, and charging, as well as a new cost input—the cost of adaption, corresponding to the days a customer would need an alternative form of transportation, as the EV would not have sufficient range on those days. The end result is a qualitative model that can be used to calculate the optimal EV range (which maps back to the battery size and performance), including the influence of fast charge. Verbrugge and Wampler cautioned that the results are qualitative, given the complexity of the problem; their approach does, however, identify key factors to be considered in battery sizing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Hydro-Québec, Gouvernement du Québec open center of excellence in transportation electrification and energy storage

Hydro-Québec and the Gouvernement du Québec have opened a center of excellence in transportation electrification and energy storage, with the mission of maintaining and enhancing Québec’s global position in the field of battery materials. The center of excellence will commercialize Hydro-Québec technologies, protected by 800 patents.
LabRat's insight:
It will also create new research partnerships and develop new technologies. With 70 employees, including 27 researchers, its 2018 operating budget is of $20 million, sourced entirely from outside revenue, generated chiefly by the sale of licenses to use its technologies. For 40 years, Hydro-Québec’s research institute (IREQ) has been recognized around the world for its technological expertise and its portfolio of intellectual property, especially in the area of lithium-ion, lithium-sulfur and lithium-air batteries. This is the portfolio that the center of excellence will commercialize and expand.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Improving the Safety of Lithium-Ion Battery via a Redox Shuttle Additive 2,5-Di-tert-butyl-1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)benzene (DBBB) - ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces (ACS Publications)

Improving the Safety of Lithium-Ion Battery via a Redox Shuttle Additive 2,5-Di-tert-butyl-1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)benzene (DBBB) - ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces (ACS Publications) | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
Improving the Safety of Lithium-Ion Battery via a Redox Shuttle Additive 2,5-Di-tert-butyl-1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)benzene (DBBB)
LabRat's insight:
2,5-Di-tert-butyl-1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)benzene (DBBB) is studied as a redox shuttle additive for overcharge protection for a 1.5 Ah graphite/C-LFP lithium-ion pouch cell for the first time. The electrochemical performance demonstrated that the protecting additive remains inert during the extended standard cycling for 4000 cycles. When a 100% overcharge is introduced in the charging protocol, the baseline cell fails rapidly during the first abusive event, whereas the cell containing DBBB additive withstands 700 overcharge cycles with 87% capacity retention and no gas evolution or cell swelling was observed. It is the first time the effectiveness of the DBBB as overcharge protection additive in a large pouch cell format is demonstrated.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

All-Solid-State Batteries and their Remaining Challenges

All-Solid-State Batteries and their Remaining Challenges | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
All-solid-state batteries, which utilise a solid electrolyte in place of liquid electrolytes, have the potential for higher energy densities and greater safety than current lithium-ion batteries. However they still face many challenges before the technology is ready to be commercialised. This short report summarises the current state of knowledge in all-solid-state batteries including the electrical, electrochemical and mechanical properties of the electrolytes, and the challenges that remain to be overcome in their development and processing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Bosch, TUM neutron imaging study shows electrodes wetted twice as fast under vacuum

Bosch, TUM neutron imaging study shows electrodes wetted twice as fast under vacuum | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
Developers from Bosch and scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are using neutron imaging to analyze the filling of lithium-ion batteries for hybrid cars with electrolytes. Their experiments, reported in the Journal of Power Sources, show that electrodes are wetted twice as fast in a vacuum a
LabRat's insight:
Using neutron imaging, the scientists recognized that in a vacuum the electrodes were wetted completely in just over 50 minutes. Under normal pressure, this takes around 100 minutes. The liquid spreads evenly in the battery cell from all four sides, from the outside in. In addition, the electrodes absorb ten percent less electrolyte under normal pressure. The culprit is gases that hinder the wetting process, as the scientists were able to demonstrate for the first time using the neutrons. Resources W.J. Weydanz, H. Reisenweber, A. Gottschalk, M. Schulz, T. Knoche, G. Reinhart, M. Masuch, J. Franke, R. Gilles (2018) “Visualization of electrolyte filling process and influence of vacuum during filling for hard case prismatic lithium ion cells by neutron imaging to optimize the production process”Journal of Power Sources, Volume 380, Pages 126-134 doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2018.01.081
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Rolls-Royce partners with Superdielectrics to explore potential of new high energy capacity supercapacitor technology

Rolls-Royce has signed a collaboration agreement with UK-based technology start-up Superdielectrics Ltd to explore the potential of using novel hydrophilic polymers to create next-generation high-energy storage technology.
LabRat's insight:
Superdielectrics Ltd is a material research company that has discovered, in self-funded research with the Universities of Surrey and Bristol, a new group of polymeric superdielectrics. The company has filed patents on these materials and is working to commercialize them in supercapacitor electrolyte materials and electrical energy storage. The University of Bristol estimates that these newly discovered materials have dielectric property values which are 1,000-10,000 times greater than conventional electrolyte solutions. Researchers from the universitiesachieved practical capacitance values of up to 4F/cm2 on smooth low-cost metal foil electrodes. Existing supercapacitors on the market typically reach 0.3F/cm2 depending upon complex extended surface electrodes. More significantly, the researchers managed to achieve results of 11-20F/cm2 when the polymers were used with specially treated stainless-steel electrodes—the details of which are being kept private pending a patent application. If these values of capacitance can be achieved in production, it could potentially see supercapacitors achieving energy densities of up to 180 Wh/kg—greater than current lithium-ion batteries.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Webasto and Samsung SDI to cooperate in manufacture of commercial vehicle batteries

Webasto, global systems partner to almost all automotive manufacturers, and battery manufacturer Samsung SDI signed a letter of intent envisaging collaboration in the manufacture of high voltage batteries for the commercial vehicle sector.
LabRat's insight:
The agreement covers the development and supply of a Samsung SDI’s battery module that is the optimized solution for Webasto’s standard multi-pack concept for commercial vehicles. Webasto will integrate Samsung SDI’s prismatic Li-ion battery cell module into its battery packs which can, in turn, be assembled to create a battery system. This system-based design facilitates custom solutions for the respective requirements of commercial vehicle manufacturers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Study suggests lithium and cobalt for batteries may face supply risks by 2050

Study suggests lithium and cobalt for batteries may face supply risks by 2050 | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
Lithium and cobalt are fundamental components of present lithium-ion batteries. Analysis by researchers at the Helmholtz Institute Ulm (HIU) of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) suggests that, given the foreseen scaling of battery demand up to 2050, each may face supply risks, albeit for different reasons. The researcher
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Mercedes-Benz expands battery production to Thailand

Together with local partner Thonburi Automotive Assembly Plant (TAAP), Mercedes-Benz \ will invest a total of more than €100 (US$124 million) in production operations in Bangkok until 2020. The investment will go into an extension of the existing car plant and into a new battery assembly built on th
LabRat's insight:
[...] The battery production in Bangkok will be part of the global battery production network of Mercedes-Benz Cars for local demand and export. In total, Daimler will invest more than €1 billion in the battery production network, which will also include production facilities in Germany, the US and China. As in vehicle production, the battery production network will react flexibly and efficiently to market demand. This strategy ensures the ongoing availability of modern battery technology through local production hubs and puts Mercedes-Benz in a highly competitive position for its electric initiative. Local production of batteries in Thailand is planned to start by 2019.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Consortium led by POSCO, Samsung SDI to build $54M cathode materials plant in Chile for EVs

A consortium led by South Korea’s POSCO and Samsung SDI, and including China’s Sichuan Fulin Industrial Group and Chile’s Molyment, has won a bid to build a cathode materials plant in Chile to support that country’s Li-ion batteries project.
LabRat's insight:
POSCO and Samsung SDI will jointly invest about $54 million in the plant, which will produce 3,200 tonnes of cathode a year starting in the second half of 2021, which will be used to make lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles. On 27 February, POSCO announced that it had agreed to buy up to 240,000 tonnes of lithium concentrate per year from Australian miner Pilbara Minerals to secure a stable source of raw materials to manufacture electric vehicle batteries. POSCO has also acquired a 4.75% stake in the mining company. Pilbara owns a 100% stake in lithium mine in Pilgangoora, located in Western Australia, and plans to increase its production to 800,000 tons by gradually starting production of 300,000 tons of lithium concentrate from the second half of this year. POSCO has developed its own technology for lithium extraction from brine, PosLX. PosLX technology has been able to produce lithium in less than three months, while existing lithium extraction technology takes at least 12 months to dry brine naturally. However, POSCO’s lithium business has been delayed due to the bankruptcy of partner companies in South America, which have the Li salt reserves. POSCO has independently developed technologies to extract lithium from coal ore as well as brine, and completed the construction of a lithium carbonate commercialization plant with an annual capacity of 2,500 tons in Gwangyang in February last year.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

PNNL team develops new localized high-concentration electrolyte for high-voltage Li-metal batteries

Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed a novel localized high‐concentration electrolyte (HCE) that enables dendrite‐free cycling of lithium‐metal anodes with high Coulombic efficiency (99.5%) and excellent capacity retention (>80% after 700 cycles) of Li||LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 batteries.
LabRat's insight:
Recently, high-concentration electrolytes (HCEs, e.g., >3 M) have received much attention because their unusual functionalities effectively improve the interfacial stability between electrode and electrolyte in various battery systems. However, the high concentration of salt comes with distinct downsides, including the high cost of lithium salt. The high concentration also increases viscosity and lowers conductivity of the ions through the electrolyte. The PNNL team addressed this by localizing HCEs—diluting an HCE with an “inert” diluent. The diluent itself exhibits a similar or even wider electrochemical stability window compared to the HCE, which also does not dissolve the salt but is miscible with the solvent and the Li+-solvent solvates in the HCE. We were trying to preserve the advantage of the high concentration of salt, but offset the disadvantages. By combining a fluorine-based solvent to dilute the high concentration electrolyte, our team was able to significantly lower the total lithium salt concentration yet keep its benefits. —Ji-Guang Zhang, a senior battery researcher at PNNL and corresponding author of the paper In this process, they were able to localize the high concentrations of lithium-based salt into “clusters” which are able to still form protective barriers on the electrode and prevent the growth of dendrites. The researchers tested the patent-pending electrolyte in PNNL’s Advanced Battery Facility on an experimental battery cell similar in size to a watch battery. It was able to retain 80% of its initial charge after 700 cycles of discharging and recharging. A similar battery using a standard electrolyte can only maintain its charge for about 100 cycles. Researchers will test this localized high concentration electrolyte on pouch batteries the size and power of a cell phone battery, to see how it performs at that scale. They say the concept of using this novel fluorine-based diluent to manipulate salt concentration also works well for sodium-metal batteries and other metal batteries.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Nissan, Sumitomo Corp. and 4R open plant in Japan to recycle EV batteries

Nissan, Sumitomo Corp. and 4R open plant in Japan to recycle EV batteries | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
4R Energy Corporation, a joint venture between Nissan and Sumitomo Corporation, is opening Japan’s first plant specializing in the reuse and recycling of lithium-ion batteries from electric vehicles The availability of used lithium-ion batteries is expected to increase significantly in the near future as buyers of the first generatio
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

US team’s “design overhaul creates true lithium-air battery” | www.bestmag.co.uk

US team’s “design overhaul creates true lithium-air battery” | www.bestmag.co.uk | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
LabRat's insight:
MENU Skip to main content   If you need to know about batteries; you’ve come to the right place  点击这里访问我们的中文网站  US team’s “design overhaul creates true lithium-air battery” Fri, 03/23/2018 - 15:22 -- Xuan Zhong  Researchers in the US say they have designed a new “true” lithium-air battery that works in a natural air environment and can still function “after a record-breaking 750 charge/discharge cycles”. The team from Chicago’s University of Illinois and the Argonne National Laboratory performed an “architectural design overhaul” of the battery tech for its design— which is reported in a paper published in the journal Nature. “Our lithium-air battery design represents a revolution in the battery community,” said Amin Salehi-Khojin, assistant professor of mechanical and industrial engineering and co-corresponding author of the paper. “This first demonstration of a true lithium-air battery is an important step toward what we call ‘beyond lithium-ion’ batteries, but we have more work to do in order to commercialise it,” Salehi-Khojin said. According to the researchers, lithium-air batteries— which are believed to be able to hold up to five times more energy than the lithium-ion batteries that power our phones, laptops and electric vehicles— “have been tantalising to battery researchers for years”. But several obstacles “have plagued their development”. The batteries would work by combining lithium present in the anode with oxygen from the air to produce lithium peroxide on the cathode during the discharge phase. The lithium peroxide would be broken back down into its lithium and oxygen components during the charge phase. Unfortunately, experimental designs of such lithium-air batteries have been unable to operate in a true natural-air environment due to the oxidation of the lithium anode and production of undesirable by-products on the cathode that result from lithium ions combining with carbon dioxide and water vapour in the air, the researchers said. “These by-products gum up the cathode, which eventually becomes completely coated and unable to function. These experimental batteries have relied on tanks of pure oxygen— which limits their practicality and poses serious safety risks due to the flammability of oxygen.” Larry Curtiss, co-principal author and Argonne Distinguished Fellow said: “A few others have tried to build lithium-air battery cells, but they failed because of poor cycle life.” The UIC-Argonne research team said it overcame these challenges by using a unique combination of anode, cathode and electrolyte— the three main components of any battery— to prevent anode oxidation and build-up of “battery-killing by-products on the cathode and allow the battery to operate in a natural-air environment”. The team coated the lithium anode with a thin layer of lithium carbonate said to “selectively allow lithium ions from the anode to enter the electrolyte while preventing unwanted compounds from reaching the anode”. “In a lithium-air battery, the cathode is simply where the air enters the battery,” according to the team. “In experimental designs of lithium-air batteries, oxygen, together with all the other gases that make up air, enters the electrolyte through a carbon-based spongy lattice structure.” Salehi-Khojin and his colleagues coated the lattice structure with a molybdenum disulfate catalyst and used a unique hybrid electrolyte made of ionic liquid and dimethyl sulfoxide, a common component of battery electrolytes, that helped facilitate lithium-oxygen reactions, minimise lithium reactions with other elements in the air and boost the efficiency of the battery.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Variations and Applications of the Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Ionic Liquids - Chemical Communications (RSC Publishing)

Variations and Applications of the Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Ionic Liquids - Chemical Communications (RSC Publishing) | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
Increasing energy demands call for new energy storage technologies with high energy density to meet current and future needs. Metal-air batteries are especially attractive due to their superior specific energy which is as much as 8 times that of today’s best Li-ion batteries. However, the practical values ac
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

CATL To Build Battery Factory In Europe Like LG Chem & Samsung SDI

CATL To Build Battery Factory In Europe Like LG Chem & Samsung SDI | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
Chinese lithium-ion battery manufacturer Contemporary Amperex Technology Ltd. intends to build a factory in Europe - in Germany, Poland or Hungary
LabRat's insight:
Bloomberg reports that CATL is considering three countries – Germany, Poland, Hungary, which strongly support battery investments and are close to EV assembly facilities. Poland was already chosen by LG Chem, while Hungary got the nod from Samsung SDI. For CATL, it would be its first factory outside of China, but that’s the way to go as the European market is expanding. Among customers, BMW was mentioned. There are no numbers, but Bloomberg suggests that CATL’s capacity in Europe will be bigger than Tesla’s Gigafactory.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

An easy-to-parameterise physics-informed battery model and its application towards lithium-ion battery cell design, diagnosis, and degradation

Accurate diagnosis of lithium ion battery state-of-health (SOH) is of significant value for many applications, to improve performance, extend life and increase safety. However, in-situ or in-operando diagnosis of SOH often requires robust models. There are many models available however these often require expensive-to-measure ex-situ parameters and/or contain unmeasurable parameters that were fitted/assumed. In this work, we have developed a new empirically parameterised physics-informed equivalent circuit model. Its modular construction and low-cost parametrisation requirements allow end users to parameterise cells quickly and easily. The model is accurate to 19.6 mV for dynamic loads without any global fitting/optimisation, only that of the individual elements. The consequences of various degradation mechanisms are simulated, and the impact of a degraded cell on pack performance is explored, validated by comparison with experiment. Results show that an aged cell in a parallel pack does not have a noticeable effect on the available capacity of other cells in the pack. The model shows that cells perform better when electrodes are more porous towards the separator and have a uniform particle size distribution, validated by comparison with published data. The model is provided with this publication for readers to use.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

BMW Group working with Sila Nano on silicon-dominant anode materials

Sila Nanotechnologies, developer of higher energy density battery materials, announced a partnership with the BMW Group. Sila Nano’s first products are a family of silicon-dominant anode materials that replace conventional graphite electrodes. These materials work today and enable high cycle life, ultra-low swelling, and high energy density in next-generatio
LabRat's insight:
Sila Nano says that its materials drop into the existing battery manufacturing process, and can be manufactured economically at scale. To accelerate development, the BMW Group has been working with Sila Nano to develop the silicon anode material for the automotive market.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Porsche to invest more than $7.4B in electromobility by 2022

Porsche to invest more than $7.4B in electromobility by 2022 | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
Porsche will invest more than €6 billion (US$7.4 billion) in electromobility by 2022. The money will be spent on derivatives of the Mission E (earlier post), hybridization and electrification of the current model range, as well as on developing a charging infrastructure and smart mobility. Plans for derivatives o
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Graphene Oxide Nanosheets Offer Promise for Lithium-Metal Batteries

Graphene Oxide Nanosheets Offer Promise for Lithium-Metal Batteries | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
LabRat's insight:
Shahbazian-Yassar and colleagues used a modified separator in a lithium-metal battery to modulate the flow of lithium ions to control the rate of lithium deposition and see if they could prevent dendrites from forming. They spray-coated a fiberglass separator with graphene oxide, producing what they called a nanosheet. Using scanning electron microscopy and other imaging techniques, the researchers showed that when the nanosheet was used in a lithium-metal battery, a uniform film of lithium formed on the lithium electrode’s surface, which actually improves battery function and makes the battery much safer, says Tara Foroozan, a graduate student in the UIC College of Engineering and first author on this study.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

Mazda, ELIIY Power and Ube Industries jointly to develop 12V Li-ion starter batteries

Mazda Motor Corporation, ELIIY Power Co., Ltd. and Ube Industries, Ltd. have agreed jointly to develop lithium-ion batteries for use in automobiles. The three companies will work together to develop durable, heat- and impact-resistant 12-Volt lithium-ion batteries as a viable replacement for lead-acid starter batteries in motor vehicles b
LabRat's insight:
Mazda will conduct model-based research of the chemical reactions that occur inside batteries, develop technologies to manage high-performance batteries from a vehicle-total perspective and develop a general purpose model for their use. ELIIY Power makes high-quality stationary batteries and starter batteries for motorcycles. The safety and performance of its lithium-ion starter batteries for motorcycles is widely recognized, and the company started supplying them to a major Japanese motorcycle manufacturer in 2016. ELIIY Power will leverage its experience in developing safe, water-proof, impact-resistant battery technologies with excellent cold-weather performance to lead design and development of the basic battery unit. As a leader in the development of key components such as electrolytes and separators, Ube Industries has made significant contributions to improving the performance of lithium-ion batteries and expanding their range of applications. Its functional electrolytes have brought improvements in battery safety and longevity, and enabled higher capacity for higher voltage batteries. The company will use its accumulated expertise and engineering prowess to develop an electrolyte with a higher flash point and better heat resistance. The joint development project aims to make a next-generation battery for widespread use in place of conventional lead-acid starter batteries. In addition, the three companies will assess prospects for further collaboration in a range of fields, including using the technologies that result from this project as base for other low-voltage lithium-ion batteries applicable to vehicle electrification technologies other than starter batteries.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

A cost and resource analysis of sodium-ion batteries

A cost and resource analysis of sodium-ion batteries | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
Perspective
LabRat's insight:
Sodium-ion batteries have been identified as appealing alternatives to lithium-ion batteries because they are made from raw materials that are less expensive, more abundant and less toxic. However, the frequently discussed cost advantage of sodium-ion batteries has, so far, not been examined in detail. In this Perspective, we use the Battery Performance and Cost (BatPaC) model to undertake a cost analysis of the materials for sodium-ion and lithium-ion cells, as well as complete batteries, and determine the effect of exchanging lithium with sodium, as well as the effect of replacing the material used for the anode current collector foil, on the cost. Moreover, we compare the calculated production costs of exemplary sodium-ion and lithium-ion batteries and highlight the most relevant parameters for optimization. Finally, the major raw materials for lithium-ion cathodes are examined in terms of potential supply risks because supply issues may lead to increased costs. Through the use of a scenario-based supply and demand analysis, the risks to the supply of lithium and cobalt are assessed, and implications for battery research are discussed. Overall, we provide a broad and interdisciplinary perspective on modern batteries and future directions for this field, with a focus on sodium-ion batteries.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by LabRat
Scoop.it!

UWO team discovers new conductive phase during carbon-coating process of lithium iron phosphate; potential to improve performance

UWO team discovers new conductive phase during carbon-coating process of lithium iron phosphate; potential to improve performance | Research on Battery Technologies | Scoop.it
Researchers at The University of Western Ontario (UWO) have discovered a new conductive phase during the carbon-coating process of lithium iron phosphate (LFP) cathode material that can improve the electrochemical performance of lithium-ion batteries. As described in an open-access paper in Nature Communications, the phase content is size-, temperature-
LabRat's insight:
Conducting phase Fe2P is known in LFP/C for some time... key is in the efficient tailoring of it... Yulong Liu, Jian Liu, Jiajun Wang, Mohammad Norouzi Banis, Biwei Xiao, Andrew Lushington, Wei Xiao, Ruying Li, Tsun-Kong Sham, Guoxian Liang & Xueliang Sun (2018) “Formation of size-dependent and conductive phase on lithium iron phosphate during carbon coating.” Nature Communications 9, Article number: 929 doi:10.1038/s41467-018-03324-7
more...
No comment yet.