Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service
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Researchers Regroup Post Sandy

Researchers Regroup Post Sandy | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Researchers return to New York City next month to continue their study of insect populations in urban areas in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"When Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic, also swept through an NCSU research project collecting data on NYC insects. Researchers return to the storm-ravaged region shortly. Ecologists Amy Savage & Elsa Youngsteadt placed sticky card traps, data loggers & other measuring devices in NYC park trees. Youngsteadt was studying how urban warming affects arthropods (scale insects, leaf hoppers, caterpillars). Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, from the lab of Dr. Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NCSU. You'll find their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

 

Read the story at:

http://bulletin.ncsu.edu/2013/02/insects/

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First-Ever National Survey on Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Shows Mixed Support | NC State News

First-Ever National Survey on Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Shows Mixed Support | NC State News | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Entomologist, Fred Gould & NCSU team conduct public opinion survey

First-ever National Survey on Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Shows Mixed Support (NCSU News)

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CALS Student Perspectives | Emily Meineke | Scaling up research on a tiny pest

CALS Student Perspectives | Emily Meineke | Scaling up research on a tiny pest | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

PhD student, Emily Meineke, scales up research on a tiny pest.

 

Ever noticed how it's often hotter uptown than down? On pavement vs. grass? Emily Meineke's entomology research on scale insects examines why the tiny pest is so more abundant in cities than in towns. She hypothesizes that because cities -- with more pavement and fewer trees -- create "heat islands," these local temperature rises encourage scale to thrive. Her research has important implications for understanding the potential effects of climate change.

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