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Renewable Energy Is Gaining Steam in My Portfolio - DailyFinance

Renewable Energy Is Gaining Steam in My Portfolio - DailyFinance | Research and development | Scoop.it
Renewable Energy Is Gaining Steam in My Portfolio
DailyFinance
Which renewable source emerges the victor has yet to be seen. In my case, I have chosen to place my first bet on the effect that geothermal energy could have on the world.
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Scientists uncover hidden river of rubbish threatening to devastate ...

Scientists uncover hidden river of rubbish threatening to devastate ... | Research and development | Scoop.it
Thousands of pieces of plastic have been discovered, submerged along the river bed of the upper Thames Estuary by scientists at Royal Holloway, University of London and the Natural History Museum. ...
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New Research Project Hopes to Tame Big Data Explosion - Cordis News

New Research Project Hopes to Tame Big Data Explosion
Cordis News
The project's scientific objective is to understand social network structure and its impact on information diffusion, in order to develop analytical tools for campaign optimization.
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Ancient stone bridge revealed after Chinese lake dries up - Phys.org

Ancient stone bridge revealed after Chinese lake dries up - Phys.org | Research and development | Scoop.it
Jan 02, 2014. Scientists from Delft University of Technology have become the first to link the presence of pharmaceutical residues in the Rhine to the demographic characteristics of people living along the Rhine.
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Nanowires grown on graphene have surprising structure

Nanowires grown on graphene have surprising structure | Research and development | Scoop.it

When a team of University of Illinois engineers set out to grow nanowires of a compound semiconductor on top of a sheet of graphene, they did not expect to discover a new paradigm of epitaxy.

The self-assembled wires have a core of one composition and an outer layer of another, a desired trait for many advanced electronics applications. Led by professor Xiuling Li, in collaboration with professors Eric Pop and Joseph Lyding, all professors of electrical and computer engineering.

 

Nanowires, tiny strings of semiconductor material, have great potential for applications in transistors, solar cells, lasers, sensors and more. "Nanowires are really the major building blocks of future nano-devices," said postdoctoral researcher Parsian Mohseni, first author of the study.

 

"Nanowires are components that can be used, based on what material you grow them out of, for any functional electronics application."

 

Li's group uses a method called van der Waals epitaxy to grow nanowires from the bottom up on a flat substrate of semiconductor materials, such as silicon. The nanowires are made of a class of materials called III-V (three-five), compound semiconductors that hold particular promise for applications involving light, such as solar cells or lasers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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41 Facts About Online Students Infographic

41 Facts About Online Students Infographic | Research and development | Scoop.it

The 41 Surprising Facts About Online Students Infographic analyzes online students and their motivations for going back to school in an online setting. Who Are The Online Students? 80% of online students live within 100 miles of a campus or service center of the institution they attend. 46%... http://elearningfeeds.com/41-facts-about-online-students-infographic/


Via Christopher Pappas, Danielle M. Villegas
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Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, June 9, 2014 9:44 AM

This is a great infographic brought to my attention by Christopher Pappas. I can vouch for many of the results of some of these results from personal experience, being that I earned my Masters degree from an online program. I hope that I'll be able to do another online program in the future--that's how much I believe in online learning! 

--techcommgeekmom 

 

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WHO'S NEWS: Stephen Winter joins Related; C&W has new top dog in Jersey ... - Real Estate Weekly

WHO'S NEWS: Stephen Winter joins Related; C&W has new top dog in Jersey ... - Real Estate Weekly | Research and development | Scoop.it
WHO'S NEWS: Stephen Winter joins Related; C&W has new top dog in Jersey ...
Real Estate Weekly
Sullivan graduated Summa Cum Laude from Iona College in 1991, where he received his B.A.
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Chromadex Corp : ChromaDex® Appoints Former Nestle Executive to Its Board ... - 4-traders (press release)

Chromadex Corp : ChromaDex® Appoints Former Nestle Executive to Its Board ... - 4-traders (press release) | Research and development | Scoop.it
Chromadex Corp : ChromaDex® Appoints Former Nestle Executive to Its Board ...
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Norwegians trap sunlight with microbeads, produce solar cells that are 20 times thinner, cheaper

Norwegians trap sunlight with microbeads, produce solar cells that are 20 times thinner, cheaper | Research and development | Scoop.it

Researchers from the University of Oslo have used a bunch of “wonderful tricks” to produce silicon solar cells that are twenty times thinner than commercial solar cells. This breakthrough means that solar cells can be produced using 95% less silicon, reducing production costs considerably — both increasing profits (which are almost nonexistent at the moment), and reducing the cost of solar power installations.

 

Standard, commercial photovoltaic solar cells are fashioned out of 200-micrometer-thick (0.2mm) wafers of silicon, which are sliced from a large block of silicon. This equates to around five grams of silicon per watt of solar power, and also a lot of wastage — roughly half of the silicon block is turned into sawdust by the slicing process. With solar cells approaching 50 cents per watt (down from a few dollars per watt a few years ago), something needs to change.

 

Reducing the thickness of solar cells obviously makes a lot of sense from a commercial point of view, but it introduces another issue: As the wafer gets thinner, more light passes straight through the silicon, dramatically reducing the amount of electricity produced by the photovoltaic effect. This is due to wavelengths: Blue light, which has a short wavelength (450nm), can be captured by a very thin wafer of silicon — but red light, with a longer wavelength (750nm), can only be captured by thicker slabs of silicon. This is part of the reason that current solar cells use silicon wafers that are around 200 micrometers — and also why they’re mirrored, which doubles the effective thickness, allowing them to capture more of the visible spectrum.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Is the 50% efficient solar cell on the horizon? | GigaOM Clean Tech News

Is the 50% efficient solar cell on the horizon? | GigaOM Clean Tech News | Research and development | Scoop.it

The summer sunshine is upon us, at least here on the East Coast, which means it’s the perfect time to think about how best to harness those golden rays for clean energy. The solar industry’s power players put their newest tech on display at last week’s Intersolar North America conference in San Francisco, despite the industry’s slightly depressed showing this year (see Ucilia Wang’s report from the trade show floor).

 

Nonetheless, despite these recent business shadows, there have been glimmers of research progress. At the conference Alta Devices, for example, presented technology that can boost solar cell efficiency to between 30 percent and an unprecedented 50 percent or more, using both materials and optical advances.

 

Besides the solar market slump, constraints imposed purely by physics have also been the bane of solar cell manufacturers. Many modern commercial cells hover around the 10-20 percent efficiency mark, and boosting efficiency is a major R&D focus for many companies. There are lots of reasons why solar cells can’t reach 100 percent efficiency: blackbody radiation (think of it as ambient energy evaporation), the PV materials used, and their capacity to accommodate electrons. Oddly, photons themselves can also be a roadblock to optimal efficiency.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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