Renewable Energy in Mexico
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Fossil fuels fall as wind power surges - Irish Independent

Fossil fuels fall as wind power surges - Irish Independent | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
Irish Independent
Fossil fuels fall as wind power surges
Irish Independent
The index usually foreshadows the cost of energy for consumers, since retail power prices are determined months in advance.
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The Solar Future

The Solar Future | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it

On 28th February the Chamber collaborated with the Dutch solar business association, SolarPlaza on their all-day-conference, “A Solar Future”, part of their commercial mission to Mexico. The mission was made up of 13 international delegates and over 120 people attended the conference.

 

Mexico is very attractive to those wishing to invest in solar energy, with enviable levels of insolation - the global-mean average annual radiation is over 5kWh/m2 per day - and a plentiful supply of young workers.

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The conference began with a talk from Claudia Hernandez, the Director of Environment and Renewable Energy for the Energy Secretariat (SENER) who presented the context of  Mexico’s energy mix and future goals. Hernandez confirmed that the Mexican government is aware that it has to change and improve its processes to reach their 2026 target of having 35% of Mexico’s energy coming from renewables.  

 

John Padilla, Managing Director for IPD, was able to offer some insight into the current “state of play” in the energy sector in Mexico for the delegates. He discussed Mexico’s current - and potentially growing – dependency on natural gas, thanks to North America’s shale revolution and consequent plummeting prices (Mexico’s gas prices are based on the Henry Hub and South Texas indices.) However, looking on the ‘bright side’ he did explain that Mexico knows it has to invest more in renewables to reach its 2026 target, especially as demand for nuclear energy has all but died following recent tragedies around the world. There are also 2 million households in Mexico not connected to the central utility grid and it is in the Federal Electricity Commission’s (CFE) interests to get them connected. Padilla also explained that Mexico’s power capacity is expected to grow by 4.5% annually to 86GW in 2026 with 19.73MW coming from solar photovoltaic (PV).

Yet it remains uncertain what role solar energy and other renewables will play in Mexico’s highly anticipated Energy Reform, expected by the second semester of this year. The release of Mexico’s National Programme for Sustainable Energy is also anticipated for 2013 (the last one was published in 2009.)

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Edgar Lopez Satow, Director of Renewable Energy for the Regulatory Commission for Energy (CRE) was able to offer more practical information about the process of marketing excess electricity generated by solar PV. This can be done by connecting to Mexico’s utility grid. This grid is managed by the CFE, who are the only body in Mexico endowed with the right to sell electricity in the country. The CFE is one of the largest and most powerful public companies in Mexico which is why the CRE’s mission to promote greater competition, lower barriers to entry and balance externalities is so important.

In 2008, Mexico’s congress passed a law (Ley para el Aprovechamiento de las Energías Renovables y el Financimiento de la Transición Energetica) granting the CRE greater powers and responsibilities to better support the renewables sector.

 

Renewable energy can now be delivered to the utility grid when generated which the CFE buys at the prevailing rate at the interconnection point. If the energy is not used after 12 months, the CFE will buy it from the supplier at 85% of the marginal cost. Most companies and individuals (small and medium scale producers) can agree these contracts directly with the CFE. So far 1,700 contracts of this type have been signed and the majority for solar photovoltaics (see graph above). However for plants producing over 500kW of energy, contracts must be agreed upon with the CFE and the CRE.

The CFE and CRE can also schedule an “open season” to allow for new infrastructure to be constructed to transmit electricity from its source. The CRE determines the capacity of the new transmission line to be built, establishes how this new capacity will be paid for, and allocates transmission capacity among the different users.

Traditionally transmission rates are based on energy flows and location but, as this does not apply to renewables, the CRE has issued special wheeling rates based on location, tension levels used and minimum variable costs which are adjusted monthly for inflation.

Offering first-hand experience on this process, Conermex Founding Partner Carlos Flores spoke positively of the net-metering process for self-suppliers of solar energy and the fast-track interconnection process for small to medium scale producers.

Miguel Medina from Solartec – a self-starter company with a 10MW Capacity Park in Guanajuato - supported Flores’ comments. However he did acknowledge that his company had had problems sourcing initial investment and that time estimates for securing contracts with the CRE (supposedly 60 days maximum) are not so efficient in reality (approximately 180 days.)

Flores described residential high consumption users as those who can benefit most from solar PV as they currently pay “some of the highest energy tariffs in the world.” This segment is then followed by small commercial users. However the 20 million residential CFE users would need major financial incentives to switch to solar PV for cost-efficiency reasons. 


Via Paul van der Linden
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Australia’s largest CPV solar park completed - IM Environmental Innovation

Australia’s largest CPV solar park completed - IM Environmental Innovation | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
The largest Australian concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) solar park has been completed in Mildura, Victoria, Silex Systems has announced.
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BIPV

BIPV | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it

Via SOLAR SIMON
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SOLAR SIMON's comment, March 26, 2013 12:38 PM
Gruppi architettonici in Messico - Se il gruppo desidera una presentazione su BIPV e come si può lavorare con Desmex solare per aumentare il valore del vostro immobile clienti collegare con me
SOLAR SIMON's comment, March 26, 2013 12:38 PM
Architectural groups in mexico - If your group would like a presentation on BIPV and how you can work with Desmex Solar to enhance the value of your clients property please connect with me
SOLAR SIMON's comment, June 17, 2013 6:05 AM
www.grupoevoasis.com
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Can Integrated Photovoltaics Boost The Construction Industry?

Can Integrated Photovoltaics Boost The Construction Industry? | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
The Building Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) and Building Applied Photovoltaics (BAPV) market is expected to quadruple to $2.4 billion by 2017, according to a report released by clean technology group Pike Research.

Via Sass Peress, THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY
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Building integrated solar panels set to boom over the next 5 years | GigaOM Cleantech News

Building integrated solar panels set to boom over the next 5 years | GigaOM Cleantech News | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it

Solar panels that can be integrated right into rooftops and the walls of buildings is a new market that is set to grow dramatically over the next five years, according to a new report from Pike Research, a part of Navigant. The report says that the energy capacity of solar panels that are built into the structures of buildings will grow from 400 MW in 2012 to 2.25 GW in 2017, or a five-fold increase worldwide.

 

The solar industry calls this technology “building-integrated photovoltaics” or BIPV. Some of this new capacity will come from thin film solar panels that will be able to be printed right onto building materials, like shingles, steel roof casing, and windows. A lot of companies have been gunning for this market, and many have been held back by the difficult solar production market in 2012. There are at least 53 companies working on this tech, says Pike.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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SunWize Develops PV Projects in Ecuador - Solar Novus Today

SunWize Develops PV Projects in Ecuador - Solar Novus Today | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
SunWize Develops PV Projects in Ecuador Solar Novus Today Solar Power Plants Solar Thermal Concentrating Solar Manufacturing PV Cells and Modules Thin Film Power Electronics Balance of System. SOLAR FLARES NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP.
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Report: More look to Mexico for solar PV power - Power Engineering Magazine

Report: More look to Mexico for solar PV power - Power Engineering Magazine | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
Report: More look to Mexico for solar PV power Power Engineering Magazine “I've been in the PV solar business for 12 years, and during that time, I've seen cycles in which demand was superior to production,” Herrero said.
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Mixed Greens: Aust solar PV falls below $2/W

Mixed Greens: Aust solar PV falls below $2/W | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
Latest SolarChoice data shows Australian solar PV at $1.98/W. Energy Action reports 9% profit rise; O'Farrell pours water on NSW CSG plans.
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Holographic Display Made for $10

Holographic Display Made for $10 | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
Technophiles have dreamed of three-dimensional, holographic displays for decades, and a lot of progress has been made toward achieving that goal.

Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 28, 2013 6:30 AM

 

Holographic Display Made for $10...

 

Horizon Display's comment, July 1, 2013 6:19 PM
Insane isn't it. Sometimes you get what you pay for. But very interesting non the less
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Australia’s Solar Systems starts operations of 1.5MW demo CPV facility

Australia’s Solar Systems starts operations of 1.5MW demo CPV facility | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
Australia’s Solar Systems starts operations of 1.5MW demo CPV facility http://t.co/7R3uVShoJW #Silex #CPV #SolarSystems
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Ultracapacitors Provide Solar-to-Grid Smoothing in San Diego : Greentech Media

Ultracapacitors Provide Solar-to-Grid Smoothing in San Diego : Greentech Media | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
A new take on solar-grid integration from Maxwell, Soitec’s CPV, and UCSD’s microgrid

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Built-in Solar Energy. Limited only by Architects creativity

Built-in Solar Energy. Limited only by Architects creativity | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it

In the past, having solar panels on the roof of your home was the prerogative of the eco-warrior. However, the research and development of Photovoltaics has led to enormous steps forward. The outcome is Building Integrated Photovoltaics, a method by which the PV modules can be incorporated into the external fabric of the building.

Essentially, Building Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) refers to photovoltaic cells which can be integrated into the building envelope as part of the building structure, and therefore can replace conventional building materials, rather than being installed afterwards. Rather than sticking out like a sore thumb, BIPV modules can be naturally blended into the design of the building.


Via Pol Bacquet
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Pythagoras Solar turns windows into panels of energy | KurzweilAI

Pythagoras Solar turns windows into panels of energy | KurzweilAI | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it

Pythagoras Solar, a start-up based in San Mateo, California, is working on creating “solar windows” that could generate power for office buildings and shield offices from sunlight, thus reducing air conditioning costs, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

Thin horizontal rows of silicon cells embedded between dual panes of glass catch light from above. And through a trick of optics, the window blocks direct sunlight from entering the building. The Pythagoras window belongs to a class of solar equipment known as BIPV — building-integrated photovoltaics.


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NanoMarkets Issues New Report on BIPV Market

NanoMarkets Issues New Report on BIPV Market | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
Industry analyst firm NanoMarkets, Glen Allen, Va., has published a report titled, “Building Integrated Photovoltaics Markets, 2011,” according to a July 6 release. The BIPV products market will surpass $11 billion in revenues in 2016, up from more than $2 billion in 2011, according to the report. BIPV capacity installed will experience a 10-fold increase over the same period growing from 343 MW in 2011 to more than 3.6 GW in 2016.

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Holographic Foil Improves CPV Efficiency - Novus Light Technologies Today

Holographic Foil Improves CPV Efficiency - Novus Light Technologies Today | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
Novus Light Technologies Today Holographic Foil Improves CPV Efficiency Novus Light Technologies Today The enhanced concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) modules use 90% less silicon and could solve the problem of efficiency losses caused by heat.
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Why Is German PV Cheaper than US? Soft Costs - Solar Novus Today

Why Is German PV Cheaper than US? Soft Costs - Solar Novus Today | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it
Solar Novus Today Why Is German PV Cheaper than US? Soft Costs Solar Novus Today The study, Why Are Residential PV Prices in Germany So Much Lower Than in the United States?
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Mexican solar PV market doubled, reached 14 MW in 2012

Mexican solar PV market doubled, reached 14 MW in 2012 | Renewable Energy in Mexico | Scoop.it

Mexico has roughly doubled its solar photovoltaic (PV) market in 2012 to 14 MW, according to figures released by the nation's National Solar Energy Association (ANES).

 

This means that roughly 60,000 PV modules are installed in the nation, which it says is a huge step forward for a market less than five years old. The organization expects similar growth in 2013.

 

"It is a road that we are starting upon and certainly it will require years for us to be a power in this type of generation," said Economist and ANES spokesperson Carlos Flores.

 

"However, national standards have made great strides, especially considering that the growth was natural, without subsidies and policies which could modify this growth."


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