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Backlash after Souter jokes about mental illness

Backlash after Souter jokes about mental illness | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
Mental health campaigners including former Downing Street adviser Alastair Campbell heavily criticised Sir Brian Souter last night, after the bus tycoon used a speech to an investment conference to tell jokes about paranoia and schizophrenia.
Henry Sloan's insight:

Personally, I don't find Soutar's 'joke' uber offensive.  Not particularly funny either, but not uber offensive.  However, I can see how others would find it offensive.  It's way past time to end the stigma mental ill-health.  Mr Soutar's remarks do not help...

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Local councillor Gemma tells how she conquered depression and why she's determined to fight stigma attached to self-harming

Local councillor Gemma tells how she conquered depression and why she's determined to fight stigma attached to self-harming | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
GEMMA Welsh, 23, spent most of her teens battling her mental illness - now she wants to help raise awareness of depression and self-harming.
Henry Sloan's insight:

What an incredibly brave young, let's hae mair like her.  

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Scottish Parliament

Scottish Parliament | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
Lib Dem MSP says access to psychological therapies is "riddled with inequalities".
Henry Sloan's insight:

No comment on the motion itself.  However it was very heartening to hear many MSPs talk of the struggle of people with #MentalHealth problems, especially with the stigma.  life is difficult enough as it is, without the stigma.

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Neil Lennon opens up on battle with depression

Neil Lennon opens up on battle with depression | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
By Aidan Smith, The Scotsman IN THE away dressing-room at Ibrox after a typically tumultuous Old Firm game which had just been won by Celtic, you might imagine that Neil Lennon would havechief among those who didn’t want the ecstatic feeling to end. But the manager yesterday recalled how as a player he sat on his own desperately wishing he was somewhere else – a victim of depression. “We’d just won 2-0 and the place was euphoric,” said Lennon, whose moods could be so black that sometimes he was unable to remember anything of the matches in which he’d played. “I just sat in the corner. I just wanted to go home, turn out the lights and not speak to anyone.” Lennon opened up about his battle with depression in a film called Mind Games: Mental Health in Scottish Football which was given its first screening in Glasgow. He was the most high-profile participant but not the only one. Others who spoke just as well, and just as movingly, included Ian Murray and Robbie Neilson, two former Edinburgh derby combatants who struggled to cope with being ex-players who could no longer hear the roar of the crowd. And Iain Russell of Queen of the South was brave enough to not only appear in the film as a victim of depression still playing football but to face questions at the launch about a condition which its sufferers, as professional sportsmen, still feel inhibited about discussing because of a sense that some will think that with all their apparent privilege they don’t deserve to have mental health problems. The film was introduced by Jack Ross of PFA Scotland who produced it with the Scottish Association for Mental Health and the “See Me” campaign to end mental health stigma. He said football was a “fantastic profession and one to cherish” but with Scotland boasting 1000 pro-footballers and one in four people expected to suffer mental health issues at some time in their lives, players could not be considered immune. Obviously Russell hasn’t been. Speaking about his lowest ebb, the 31-year-old striker said: “I didn’t want to get up in the morning. Sometimes I didn’t even want to wake up.” Having taken part in the film he was given the chance to duck out of further exposure at the launch but wanted to do his bit to increase awareness and understanding. “The main reason I’m here is to help anybody out there. I have played with boys and I’m still playing with boys who are struggling.” Russell didn’t make it as a 16-year-old at Rangers and was then let go by Motherwell. “I felt as if I’d let my family down,” he recalled. But he went part-time and got happy, only for depression to properly take a grip when he returned to full-time football with Livingston. He felt “pressure and stress” to the extent he didn’t want to play. “My doctor prescribed me anti-depressants but that was when the lies started. I said I was taking thembut I wasn’t. When I came home from football I hid in the toilet, not wanting to speak to my wife. I stopped eating and ended up having to take six weeks off because I got a viral infection and became quite ill.” Although this isn’t the unforgiving, unreconstructed 1970s anymore, football is still a macho environment – how had team-mates reacted to his condition? “They take the mickey, but in a good way!” Tony Higgins, Scottish rep of international players’ union FIFPro, was a 1970s footballer with Hibernian and a team-mate of Erich Schaedler, who took his own life at just 36. He said yesterday: “It would have been an acknowledgement of weakness to have admitted you suffered from depression, that you couldn’t cope, in those bad old days. The mentality of the dressing-room was very macho. There are many theories about my old colleague Erich. He was either very high or very quiet, he seemed to oscillate between the two. The game then wouldn’t have recognised [depression]. Nobody would have told the rest of the players [about a suffering team-mate]. You would have seen that player being isolated. Iain talks about the camaraderie of the dressing-room and it recognising what he’s dealing with. That’s why what he and others are doing [with this film] is so important.” Murray spoke with old Hearts rival Neilson about the post-football comedown. “People want to talk to footballers, they ask for their autographs, and then suddenly that stops,” said Murray. Neilson said no longer playing on Saturdays, with the radio broadcasting games and desperately wishing he still was, made him difficult for his family to be around. Lennon mentioned Stan Collymore’s battle with depression and how like many at the time he was ignorant of the condition. “My reaction was to ask what he had to be depressed about.” Lennon also recalled what should have felt like his own peak as a player. “Leicester City had just won the League Cup and I had everything I wanted – the money, the house, the lifestyle. But one morning I woke up and thought: ‘Something’s not right here.’” He got better through taking anti-depressants. Lennon called for more medical help for players with mental health issues. “It can make somebody’s life better, never mind their career,” he said. Football was “macho-dominated” where those with problems were still reluctant to admit them. At Celtic he kept a careful watch on younger players. “My door is always open to them. Once you’ve experienced [depression] you can help by telling them it’ll be all right.” Original source: http://www.scotsman.com/sport/football/spfl/neil-lennon-opens-up-on-battle-with-depression-1-3352226 Discuss: Please do join our forums to discuss any of these topics in a sensitive and confidential environment.Advice: Our illnesses and treatments section can offer you information on various mental illnesses and their symptoms.Support: If you are in need of someone to talk to tonight please call our helpline, which is open from 6pm -11pm. 
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Could you make yourself happier?

Could you make yourself happier? | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
Depression has become the biggest cause of disability on the planet, according to the World Health Organisation, so what more could people do to improve their levels of happiness?
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Charlotte Dawson death: BeyondBlue CEO hits out at social media

Charlotte Dawson death: BeyondBlue CEO hits out at social media | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
Mental health expert says online abuse can exacerbate mental health issues and calls on Twitter and Instagram to act
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Why is University Mental Health Awareness Week so important?

Why is University Mental Health Awareness Week so important? | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
The jump from sixth form or college to university is a big one. It’s a time when sprightly young adults are waving goodbye to their parents and waving hello to life on campus, where they’re faced with grown-up decisions like "can I really get away with going out two nights on the trot?"
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Not alone, but still lonely? Yes, it can happen.

Henry Sloan's insight:

Not alone, but still lonely?  Yes, it can happen.

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FIXERS: Calls for anxiety disorders to be taken more seriously

FIXERS: Calls for anxiety disorders to be taken more seriously | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
19 year old Jake Land from New Mills wants to spread the message about panic attacks, which he says are frightening symptoms of a serious condition.
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Creating a greater understanding | Holyrood Magazine

Creating a greater understanding | Holyrood Magazine | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
  Eric likes to keep busy. He plays Scrabble twice a week, along with chess, dominoes, and badminton to keep fit, and he also has a 20-year-old son who
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Lady Hamilton calls for change in law on sectioning

Lady Hamilton calls for change in law on sectioning | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
The Duke of Hamilton’s widow has called for a change in the law surrounding the detention of people in psychiatric hospitals.
Henry Sloan's insight:

Yes, he may have been one of the aristocracy with all the aristocatic baggage that entails.  However, at heart, he is a human being, with the right to live though his final illness with dignity.  That he wasn't treated that way is beyond disgrace.

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Not every mentally ill person is a poster child for mental illness

Not every mentally ill person is a poster child for mental illness | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
I’ve spent time in psychiatric hospitals; I look like a “normal” person, too. But what if I didn’t? Not everyone can be a poster child for mental health.
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Disability cuts come with a dehumanising rhetoric

Disability cuts come with a dehumanising rhetoric | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
Frances Ryan: The cuts get personal: 'Skiver v striver' is the idea that the attack on disabled people is based on. It's an entirely false dichotomy

Via WOWpetition
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Overworked and isolated - work pressure fuels mental illness in academia

Overworked and isolated - work pressure fuels mental illness in academia | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
Exclusive: Guardian survey shows heavy workloads to blame for mental health problems among academics
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Trigger warnings: What do they do?

Trigger warnings: What do they do? | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
Trigger warnings caution readers about content which may unsettle those with mental health difficulties.
Henry Sloan's insight:

Hopefully, a useful guide to trigger warnings on the internet - when to use them, and when not, advantages and disadvantages.

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Mental illness epidemic among Scotland’s jobless

Mental illness epidemic among Scotland’s jobless | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
PATIENTS with mental health problems are being left to suffer as waiting targets for their conditions are missed, according to MSPs.
Henry Sloan's insight:

Glad to see in the Holyrood debate many MSPs talk of the stigma suffered by those with #MentalHealth problems.

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There is a culture of acceptance around mental health issues in academia

There is a culture of acceptance around mental health issues in academia | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
I've seen PhD students with depression, sleep issues, eating disorders, and thoughts of suicide. Mental health in academia is an issue that needs to be addressed
Henry Sloan's insight:

It's a wee while since I was a student, but I remember the pressure many students under then.  In these days of so much competition for top graduate jobs, it seems to be much worse now.

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Mark Wood: 'Sweet and gentle' 44-year-old man with mental health problems 'starved to death after benefits cut'

Mark Wood: 'Sweet and gentle' 44-year-old man with mental health problems 'starved to death after benefits cut' | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
A “sweet and gentle” 44-year-old man with mental health conditions appears to have starved to death after his benefits were cut.
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Time to change the language we use about mental health

Time to change the language we use about mental health | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
Gary Nunn: The world has moved on since the days of 'Bonkers Bruno' headlines, but we still need to mind our language
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Police inspector who used Twitter to raise awareness of mental health issues has account suspended over claims of misuse

Police inspector who used Twitter to raise awareness of mental health issues has account suspended over claims of misuse | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
Inspector Michael Brown’s account and blog, Mental Health Cop, were praised by experts for explaining the policing of mental health since 2011. But today it was taken down.
Henry Sloan's insight:

Yes, I know it's the Daily Heil, but.....  they do get it right once in a while.

 

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Eating disorder focus put on male sufferers

Eating disorder focus put on male sufferers | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
A SERIES of events to raise awareness of eating disorders will highlight the problem among men.
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Eating disorder focus put on male sufferersHelen McArdleNews ReporterTuesday 11 February 2014

A SERIES of events to raise awareness of eating disorders will highlight the problem among men.

The issue will be raised during the first Eating Disorders Awareness Week, organised by Aberdeenshire West MSP Dennis Robertson.

Mr Robertson has campaigned to improve understanding of anorexia and bulimia since his daughter Caroline lost her five-year battle with anorexia in 2011, aged 19.

A conference due to be held at the Scottish Parlia-ment on February 28 will examine the role of the media and fashion industries in eating disorders, as well as shedding light on the challenges faced by men who fall victim.

Paul Donald, 23, who set up charity Men and Boys Eating and Exercise Disorders Service will be among the speakers.

Mr Donald began developing anorexia when he was 17 and says the health service has marginalised male victims.

He said: "It took me three years to get help. I was turned away because I wasn't female, they didn't know what to do with me. Another man I know was told by his GP to go to McDonald's and eat a burger. It's a disgrace."

Mr Donald said that male eating disorders were confused with men obsessively working out in an effort to "bulk up", when in fact men are increasingly feeling under pressure to slim down into slim-fit shirts and trousers.

Boys are most likely to develop eating disorders at 13, compared to 15 among girls, but he added that there were a lot of men aged 43-67 who were reluctant to seek help for eating disorders which may have begun decades ago.

He said: "One client, a 43-year-old man, spends four hours in the supermarket every day analysing the ingredients. He's cut out sugar, he's cut out fat. It's taken over his life."

Eating Disorders Awareness Week will run from February 24-28.

Mr Robertson said: "We want to continue raising awareness and improving the support that's available, especially around mental health.

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Shiny ‘app-y people: Treating depression from your smart phone

Shiny ‘app-y people: Treating depression from your smart phone | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
Suzi Gage: Can your phone improve your mood? A new app developed by researchers at the University of Bristol might do just that
Henry Sloan's insight:

A test app and they're charging £1.49 for it?  Albiet the money is going to the Mental Health Foundation, I do wonder if the price is perhaps a little steep.

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Global impact of depression revealed

Global impact of depression revealed | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
Depression is the second leading cause of disability worldwide, according to a review of research.
Henry Sloan's insight:

Well, it certainly doesn't help.

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CAT CUBIE & JAI MCDOWALL SUPPORT OUR LATEST CAMPAIGN

CAT CUBIE & JAI MCDOWALL SUPPORT OUR LATEST CAMPAIGN | Reject when depressed | Scoop.it
see me scotland - anti-stigma mental health campaign.
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