Where on Earth are we? (Online resources for Stage 1)
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There's a Map on My Lap! All About Maps.

Reading from the book "There's a Map on My Lap!: All about Maps" by Tish Rabe, Aristides Ruiz (Illustrator) From the Cat in the Hat's Learning Library Voice:...
Dave Baker's insight:

To introduce the idea of a globe, it's important to first introduce the whole concept of mapping; that geographical information from reality can be simplified and scaled down in order to be accessible and useful for a specific audience. It's also important revise old vocabulary and to introduce new vocabulary.

 

The book 'There's a Map on my Lap' can be used to achieve both of these goals in the classroom. This video can assist class activities based on the book. Initially a task could be given to help ensure all students know the meaning of key words from the book.

 

To explore the idea of scale, students could be asked to make a room plan of their bedroom. This would be first modelled by a room plan of the classroom done together. This activity will also develop mathematical skills, as students in stage 1 are beginning to learn multiplicative strategies, but simple scales and potentially grid paper could be used to assist those who are not as confident in multiplication.

 

Students could also be asked to make pictorial maps marking key feature and landmarks (using a legend) of their school or local area, again with appropriate modelling by the teacher; a task in line with the Board of Studies NSW (2007, p. 16) foundational statement. The class could come up with a list and agreed pictures for important places.

 

Students could be asked to describe the different maps they have made considering their usefulness and audience (a literacy based strategy). Eg a room plan is of a small area which doesn't really need a map to navigate, but could be of use to its occupant or an architect/builder; a classroom is bigger and more complex and has more frequent new visitors who could need help navigating; a pictorial map of the local area helps highlight important places that might not be noticed in a street map.

 

Other activities that could be adapted are the measuring non-direct distance with string, and the dot map (it doesn't have to be people). Terminology  such as north, south, east, west, and longitude and latitude are generally addressed in stage 2 and 3 respectively and therefore should not be the main focus (Board of Studies NSW, 2007, p. 55, 61) Also watch out for and adapt American-isms.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

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A shared history - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6 - Introduction to maps

A shared history - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6 - Introduction to maps | Where on Earth are we? (Online resources for Stage 1) | Scoop.it
Dave Baker's insight:

Having established some key concepts about maps and globes, we can now use them to gain insight into our world.

 

These maps of Aboriginal nations/language groups help form the core of the aboriginal perspective in schools (Queensland Government, 2007) They are present in city, state and country scales. They show the diversity of Aboriginal culture. A map is a really powerful tool to demonstrate this point. The national scale can be used to see the breadth of diversity, and attention can be drawn to the Torres Strait Islands as well. At the city level, the city map could be displayed on a smart board with a general map of Sydney overlayed. This could be used by the students to determine which aboriginal culture is connected to the land that the school is on, and if different, where their homes are as well. Students could then be guided to finding out information on that culture. Some links to websites for specific culture are in the resource, but many are no longer functioning.

The map could also be used to in a series of comparisons to demonstrate various points. It could be compared to a state map of Australia to demonstrate how maps can change over time as different people use/possess the land differently. The maps will help prepare students to understand that terra nullius was a false concept.

The map could also be used to compare to Europe. The size and number of nations and languages could be compared to further highlight the diversity of Aboriginal cultures.

 

Queensland Government. (2007). Selecting and evaluating resources: Guidelines, Indigenous perspectives. Brisbane, Queensland Studies Authority

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G. Liang's curator insight, April 5, 2016 9:08 AM

This is an excellent teaching resource which engages students with quality and accurate information of ATSI peoples. The Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs believes that “it is important that all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students are taught by high quality teachers in schools led by effective and supportive principals who are assisted by world class curriculum that incorporates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives” (MCEEDYA, 2010, p. 22). This curriculum support resource achieves this through being consulted with Aboriginal educators; having input from contemporary ATSI peoples in participation and being accurate and supported by the Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate (DET NSW, 2003). This resource also incorporates the geographical tool of maps. 


Teaching Idea:

- Dave’s teaching idea of using the IWB to look at the map to demonstrate the diversity of Aboriginal culture is excellent. 

- To add on to this idea, by specifically looking at how their school ground is connected with ATSI communities allows students to recognize that “land and country are embedded within a totality of a person, spirit and country” and that their connection to the place of Australia is inherent (Taylor, 2012, p. 62). 

- Students can then further conduct geographical inquiry through exploring the NSW Interactive map that their school is on, and using the ‘List of Aboriginal Nations of NSW’ link and the internet to research further into the geographical inquiry about where these nations are today and their contemporary recognition of land ownership. Through conducting this research about traditional owners of the Australian country, students “re-examine evidence and assumptions” and “shake up habitual ways of working and thinking, to dissipate conventional familiarities and re-evaluate rules and institutions” about the current state of affairs (Foucault, 1996, p. 462, as cited in Taylor, 2012, p. 54). 


References:

New South Wales Department of Education and Training. (2003). Aboriginal Education K-12: Resource Guide. Sydney: Professional support and Curriculum Directorate NSW DET. 


Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs. (2008). Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians. Melbourne: Author. 


Taylor, T. (2012). Introduction to Inquiry- based learning. (Chapter 4). In Taylor, Fahey, Kriewaldt & Boon. Place and Time. Explorations in Teaching Geography and History. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia. p. 54-62

Alexis King's curator insight, April 12, 2016 5:03 AM
Stage 1 Geography
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Where does your food come from?

Where does your food come from? | Where on Earth are we? (Online resources for Stage 1) | Scoop.it
Free classroom resources, information and ideas from Practical Action to help teach about Climate Change in the primary school
Dave Baker's insight:

This interactive food map and the food labels survey notes in the side bar are another way to apply the skills about maps learnt so far, and also connecting teaching to the everyday geography that  Martin (2006) promotes.

 

This website can be used as a resource for the teacher, as well as model for the students to then as a class create a similar map of production for Australia. The task would involve students bringing an item  from home where the origin of the item is on the packet or tag (doesn't have to be limited to food). Teachers can also bring some extra items perhaps from some of the less common sources. As a class different source countries could be identified on the smart board. Then students could create their own maps in groups. This could be done on paper, or with tactile material like wool, or even on 'Goggle Maps Engine' This will help them to identify Australia often, and also help them practically see the uses of the flat global-scale map.

The activity helps build a global perspective of the world as they see the interconnections between people through goods (Commonwealth of Australia, 2011) Students could them be asked to compare how many things came from Australia/the rest of the world. The number of items from each country could be graphed according to frequency and some simple statements and then inferences could be made about the trends of where the items came from. 

 

Commonwealth of Australia. (2011). Global perspectives: a framework for global education in Australian Schools. Victoria: Education Services Australia.

 

Martin, F. (2006) Everyday geography: Re-visioning primary geography for the 21st century. Geographical Education, 19, 31-36.

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MapMaker Interactive

Use our tools to explore the world, learn about human and physical patterns, and make your own maps.
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Explore the Taj Mahal with Google Maps - YouTube

Explore 360-degree imagery of the Taj Mahal, India's crown jewel, now in Street View. To learn more visit http://goo.gl/6wXjBi
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Mapping Our World | Oxfam Education

Mapping Our World | Oxfam Education | Where on Earth are we? (Online resources for Stage 1) | Scoop.it
This unique interactive website works with maps and globes to transform pupils' understanding of the world. Winner of a Geographical Association Gold award and a BAFTA award for primary learning, Mapping Our World allows pupils to flatten
Dave Baker's insight:

After introducing maps in general, some of the more complicated factors of a globe can be address. This resource helps make the point that:
A) The earth is round.

B) Flat maps of the earth are never quite right.

B) Different projections serve different purposes, and can change how we perceive the world.

 

Oxfam's Mapping Our World is an interactive tool that helps address these points while continuing to build on the concept of scale. There are three lessons of increasing difficulty with 3 games or activities within each one. Each activity has its own teacher notes, so I'll just focus on some of the more important activities and ideas.

Firstly, the benefits and problems with the globe and a flat map. Using 'The Globe Unwrapped'  allows students to see how a globe can easily change its orientation through rotation, but will never let you see the whole world at once. The flattening process of the activity allows students to see the changes in size and shape that occur, and note that the whole world can be seen at once. If real globes are used along side this activity it will also be apparent that a globe will not easily fit in a book. Peeling an orange (potentially with an approximate map drawn on it) could also be a tactile activity the teacher performs, allowing the students to try (and fail) to use the peel to make a regular shape in the same orientation as the orange.

The 'Chat Show' in lesson 2 and 'How Many Times?' in lesson 3 help demonstrate the choices that are made when turning a spherical globe into a flat map, and the reasons for those choices. In teaching these idea's s important to note that as teachers we understand that maps are socially constructed (Kleeman & Huchinson, 2005, p. 6). Oxfam favours the Peter's projection which has a more accurate representation of the relative sizes of countries and overall position, as opposed to the Mercator projection which places countries in better positions relative to each other, and gives them a more accurate shape. Using the constructivist principles mentioned in Kleeman (& Huchinson, 2005) teacher can use these activities get the students to reflect on what they value as more important. (and can link back to idea's about audience and purpose ie are they a sailor needing a map that will help them get from one country to another or are they students who will be thinking about relative sizes of countries). The prediction  tool in'How Many Times?' allows students to first make thoughtful estimates based on size and shape.

 

Kleeman, G., & Huchinson, N. (2005). Maps in Classrooms. The Globe, 57, 1-12.

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Mapping with Google - Courses

Mapping with Google - Courses | Where on Earth are we? (Online resources for Stage 1) | Scoop.it
Dave Baker's insight:

Huge increases in positional and locative technologies, such as Google maps, are shaping the way that we construct 'place', and the way which we interact with maps (Crawford & Giggin, 2009). Google maps can be used as an authentic teaching tool to help students know their local area and common route, to share information about their favourite places. It can also be used at the city, state, national, region and global scale.
These tutorials are can be a source of inspiration for ways to use Google maps as a classroom activity. Some are a bit basic, but the one on Google Maps Engine has a lot of teaching potential.

But first some basic activities. Google maps can help you develop the concept of scale even further. According to (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 245) Scale is the key to unlocking the mysteries of space while at the same time gaining a greater understanding of the depth of a place.
This first activity could be used to assess their understanding of the globe, maps and scale so far by in groups of 3 or 4 figuring out what information can learnt from a local, city, state, national, region and global scale. Then they each draw an annotated picture of who might want to use that scale and what they plan to do using the map. eg aliens at the planet level, a sailor at the regional level etc.

Using the local scale, you could get the students to find the route from their house to school. You could ask them to then find an alternate route, and figure out which one they think would be longer/shorter or faster/slower. This could be used to assess how well they understood the mapping concepts taught in the first session on 'There's a Map on My Lap'. They would have to make note of the scale, consider how they would measure distances (eg using string) perhaps think about traffic. (Of course it would depend on how

Finally, using 'Google Maps Engine' you could ask students to create their own map and plot their favourite places in their local area and describe why they like them. The teacher could help the class reflect on the different ways which each of them relate to their local communities in a class discussion. This would use everyday geography as a starting point for developing a geographical imagination (Martin, 2006, p. 35)

 
Crawford, A., & Giggin, G. (2009) Geomobile web: Locative technologies and mobile media. Australian Journal of Communication, 36, 97-109
 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia

 

Martin, F. (2006) Everyday geography: Re-visioning primary geography for the 21st century. Geographical Education, 19, 31-36.

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Exploring Maps and Models

Exploring Maps and Models | Where on Earth are we? (Online resources for Stage 1) | Scoop.it
Students compare miniatures to real items. Then they explore maps and globes as miniature versions of places and the Earth.
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Earth Pendant or Window Light Catcher Craft - EnchantedLearning.com

Make an Earth Pendant or Window Light Catcher.
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Five Cool, Easy Things You Can Do in Google Earth - Earth Help

Want to jump in and start having fun with Google Earth? Try the the following:

View an image of your home, school or any place on Earth
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