Taylor Swift (Spotify)
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Taylor Swift's YouTube activity doubled after Spotify controversy

Taylor Swift's YouTube activity doubled after Spotify controversy | Taylor Swift (Spotify) | Scoop.it
Taylor Swift's daily YouTube views doubled in the first week after she and her label began no longer offering her music on Spotify, Nielsen told Mashable.

Via midem
Wyatt Feiling's insight:

I agree with Taylor Swift's statement that music is art, and art should be valued.  With non-paying users streaming her music on Spotify, she,as the artist, wasn't receiving money for her craft.  It's a wise move to make.

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Jason Aldean, Justin Moore, and Brantley Gilbert Pull Latest Albums From Spotify

Jason Aldean, Justin Moore, and Brantley Gilbert Pull Latest Albums From Spotify | Taylor Swift (Spotify) | Scoop.it
Taylor Swift made headlines last week when she made the decision to remove her entire music collection from Spotify because she doesn’t feel that the service “fairly compensates the writers, producers, artists, and creators of this music.”...
Wyatt Feiling's insight:

Other artists follow in Taylor Swift's footsteps in order to prevent them losing album sales and over an income for newly released material.  It's a smart decision moneywise, but at the same time doesn't cater to the fans.

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Here's How Much Taylor Swift Made In One Year From Streaming On Spotify

Here's How Much Taylor Swift Made In One Year From Streaming On Spotify | Taylor Swift (Spotify) | Scoop.it
Taylor Swift's move to pull her music from the streaming service Spotify is starting to look like a smart one.

Via Reginald Shipman
Wyatt Feiling's insight:

Swift was paid $500,000, which was less than the previous year from streaming her music.  Compared to her recent album release, selling 1.287 million copies in the first week, she made more money selling her record through other music outlets.

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Taylor Swift's YouTube activity doubled after Spotify controversy

Taylor Swift's YouTube activity doubled after Spotify controversy | Taylor Swift (Spotify) | Scoop.it
Taylor Swift's daily YouTube views doubled in the first week after she and her label began no longer offering her music on Spotify, Nielsen told Mashable.

Via midem
Wyatt Feiling's insight:

I agree with Taylor Swift's statement that music is art, and art should be valued.  With non-paying users streaming her music on Spotify, she,as the artist, wasn't receiving money for her craft.  It's a wise move to make.

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Spotify Doesn’t Hurt Artists: My Band Would Be Nowhere Without It

Spotify Doesn’t Hurt Artists: My Band Would Be Nowhere Without It | Taylor Swift (Spotify) | Scoop.it
If more big acts follow Taylor Swift’s lead, bands like ours could lose an important outlet to have their music heard.
The post Spotify Doesn’t Hurt Artists: My Band Would Be Nowhere Without It appeared first on WIRED.
Wyatt Feiling's insight:

Spotify is a great outlet for getting out the word about local bands, or bands that have yet to break out in the music scene.  It's beneficial for listeners to listen to bands who produce their own music.

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Spotify: Friend or Foe? | John Seabrook | The New Yorker

Spotify: Friend or Foe? | John Seabrook | The New Yorker | Taylor Swift (Spotify) | Scoop.it

Daniel Ek, the C.E.O. of Spotify, is a rock star of the tech world, but he is not long on charisma. At thirty-one, he is pale, boyish, cerebral, and calm. Jantelagen, the Scandinavian code of humility and restraint, is strong in him.

 

He doesn’t greet you with a firm handshake from behind an imposing desk; he doesn’t have a desk. He sprawls on a couch with his laptop, like a teen-ager doing homework. Or he wanders the company’s offices, which form an oval around the open core of a big building on Birger Jarlsgatan, in central Stockholm. The design encourages “random encounters,” which Ek once read was Steve Jobs’s plan in laying out Pixar’s offices.

Ek’s phlegmatic manner makes his unshakable, almost spiritual belief in Spotify burn all the more brightly. His vision, that Spotify is a force for good in the world of music, is almost Swedenborgian: salvation in the form of a fully licensed streaming-music service where you can find every record ever made.

 

Spotify doesn’t sell music; it sells access to it. Instead of buying songs and albums, you pay a monthly subscription fee ($9.99), or get served an ad every few songs if you’re on the free tier.

 

You can listen to anything on the service—the Beatles (as with iTunes, the surviving members are not rushing in) and Taylor Swift (who left the service in a flurry of publicity in early November) notwithstanding—and there is an astonishing amount of music.

 

When Spotify launched, in October, 2008, in Sweden and a handful of other European countries, Ek’s dream seemed like the longest of long shots. Now Spotify is the Netflix of music sites. Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s founder, says, “Daniel just saw the opportunities of streaming music before anyone else.”

Spotify appeared nine years after Napster, the pioneering file-sharing service, which unleashed piracy on the record business and began the cataclysm that caused worldwide revenues to decline from a peak of twenty-seven billion dollars, in 1999, to fifteen billion, in 2013.

 

The iTunes store, the industry’s attempt, in partnership with Apple, to build a digital record shop, opened in 2003 to sell downloads, but that didn’t alter the downward trajectory; indeed, by unbundling tracks from the album, so that buyers could cherry-pick their favorite songs, Apple arguably hastened the decline. Legal actions against individuals—thousands of people in the U.S. were sued for downloading music illegally—only alienated potential customers.

 

As bad as the bloodbath was in the U.S., the situation was even worse in Sweden. Pelle Lidell, an executive with Universal Music Publishing in Stockholm, told me that by 2008 “we were an inch away from being buried, and Spotify single-handedly turned that around.”

Ek was one of the pirate band. Before starting the company, he had briefly been the C.E.O. of uTorrent, which made money in part by monetizing pirated music and movies on BitTorrent, a major file-sharing protocol.

 

Later, the Napster co-founder Sean Parker, for years Public Enemy No. 1 to record-company executives, joined forces with Ek. Who would have imagined, as one label head put it recently, that “your enemy could become your friend”?

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Wyatt Feiling's insight:

Personally I think Spotify is great for listeners to branch out of their comfort zone musically, and find a new artist or band to appreciate in another genre.  The only thing that isn't so great is that users who don't have a premium account on Spotify get to listen to the artist's music for free.  Even though some artists are fine with that, many one major record labels don't meet the mark when it comes to sales.

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