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If You Don't Define Your Personal Brand the Market Will

If You Don't Define Your Personal Brand the Market Will | Rec | Scoop.it
I have long advised startup companies that if you don't control your messaging somebody else will and your potential customers will form impressions of you shaped by somebody else or by nobody at a...
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Microsoft Explains the Specifics of MPEG DASH Streaming

Microsoft Explains the Specifics of MPEG DASH Streaming | Rec | Scoop.it
Confused over how the MPEG DASH adaptive streaming standard works? This session from Streaming Media Europe has the answers.

Via Ludovic Bostral, Olivier NOEL
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On-demand services: understanding consumer choices - ResearchFindr

On-demand services: understanding consumer choices - ResearchFindr | Rec | Scoop.it
Participants tended to say that they watched on-demand content with a higher level of engagement than linear TV.
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Not Everyone’s Excited For Their Next Adventure. Sometimes People Get Fired | TechCrunch

Not Everyone’s Excited For Their Next Adventure. Sometimes People Get Fired | TechCrunch | Rec | Scoop.it
There's a big difference between jumping ship and being forced to walk the plank. Yet every time a high-ranking employee leaves a tech company, people assume the boat is sinking. In fact, it can mean quite the opposite.
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Reliable UDP (RUDP): The Next Big Streaming Protocol?

Reliable UDP (RUDP): The Next Big Streaming Protocol? | Rec | Scoop.it

New so-called reliable UDP solutions offer an alternative to TCP. But are they worth the time or money to implement?

 

Reliable UDP transports can offer the ideal situation for enterprise workflows -- one that has the benefit of high-capacity throughput, minimal overhead, and the highest possible "goodput" (a rarely used but useful term that refers to the part of the throughput that you can actually use for your application's data, excluding other overheads such as signaling). In the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) world, from which the IP standards arise, for nearly 30 years there has been considerable work in developing reliable data transfer protocols. RFC-908, dating from way back in 1984, is a good example.


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Amazon creates exchange for reserved cloud capacity • The Register

Amazon creates exchange for reserved cloud capacity • The Register | Rec | Scoop.it

Amazon has announced a new program that aims to save you from your own stupidity. Well, maybe not your stupidity, but what about that other sysadmin, the one who makes you roll your eyes from time to time? You know the guy.

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HTML5 isn't Facebook's 'biggest mistake' • The Register

Zuckerberg's biggest mistake, as he described in an interview at the Disrupt conference, was "betting too much on HTML5 as opposed to native" app development. For a man who two years ago said he's made "any mistake you can think of" but affirmed "if you're building a product that people love, you can [afford to] make a lot of mistakes," singling out HTML5 seems weak. Especially in light of the IPO debacle.

But then, the problem doesn't seem to be HTML5, per se, but rather Facebook's use of it.

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HEVC : The compression technology promises to optimize OTT and UHDTV delivery

HEVC : The compression technology promises to optimize OTT and UHDTV delivery | Rec | Scoop.it

As consumers increasingly view live and VOD television on a broader range of IP-connected devices, broadcasters are struggling to deliver these high-bandwidth services. However, a new video compression standard called High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) promises to improve upon the current compression standard H.264, also known as MPEG-4 AVC, easing broadcasters’ pain. Using HEVC, broadcasters can reduce the data rate needed for high-quality video coding by approximately 50 percent, enabling them to deploy higher quality OTT video services using the same amount of bandwidth, or half the bandwidth at the same quality. In addition to improving OTT delivery, HEVC also has the potential to support a broad range of current and future applications, including 4K x 2K Ultra High Definition Television (UHDTV), making it an extremely exciting technology that pushes the consumer experience to the next level.


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SnoiD's comment, September 13, 2012 8:08 PM
Quand je vois encore des services actuels fonctionner en codec MPEG2 j'me dis que la priorité des créateurs de services n'est pas forcément là où on pense :D
Thierry Fautier's comment, September 15, 2012 12:54 AM
HEVC is going to be big, Especially for OTT, that bypasses operators, direct connection between contentb and devices. Then operators will start to enjoy :)
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Online Video Distribution Plan for your Video Marketing Strategy @B2Community

Online Video Distribution Plan for your Video Marketing Strategy @B2Community | Rec | Scoop.it
No matter how fantastic your video creations are, it will mean nothing if you don’t market and distribute them effectively.

 

Online video distribution should be a part of your video marketing strategy and is as important, if not more so, than the video production process. Not only do you need to ensure that you distribute your video to ensure it reaches a wide audience, you also need to measure the impact of your different distribution methods to inform future strategy.


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How to build a Netflix-like multiscreen OTT service

How to build a Netflix-like multiscreen OTT service | Rec | Scoop.it
Analysis of Netflix's technology choices and explanation of the major challenges and associated DRM issues of building multiscreen OTT services.
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The PwC Mobile Innovations Forecast - ResearchFindr

The Mobile Innovations Forecast includes technologies that are not currently significant enablers of innovation, but could become important within our five-year period.
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Major Transformation in CEE TV Markets - ResearchFindr

TV markets in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) are booming, with strong growth in multichannel households, viewing time and revenues. Fuelled by this rapid growth, the rules of the game are changing and competitive pressure is increasing.
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HTML5 is dead. Long live HTML5!

Before you take Mark Zuckerberg's HTML5-bashing as evidence that Web apps are dead, remember that Facebook's problems are not everyone's problems. And the company still likes Web apps in some circumstances.
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How Market Will React to Amazon's Elastic Transcoder

How Market Will React to Amazon's Elastic Transcoder | Rec | Scoop.it

If someone told me that that someday I’d be writing—excitedly, even-- about something called the Amazon Elastic Transcoder, I would have thought that dude just finished the Jack Daniel’s.  

But today is that day. Indeed, quite soberly, Amazon Web Services just announced it is marketing a new cloud video conversion and delivery system—the aforementioned Amazon Elastic Transcoder (AET) that can seamlessly convert original source video files to format correctly on every kind of gadget, but perhaps most importantly, on iPads and iPhones and Androids and various smart TVs. That is big news to content owners looking for easy ways to get their videos from one place to the other, without spending a bundle on equipment to do it.

The trouble with progress is that everybody has their own definition. Every device out there comes with its own transcoding challenges, and every new gizmo needs software—often expensive software—to do the job. But then software that needs to be tested, a long, painstaking process that takes content providers far away from the original task, which is to create and distribute good looking video. Amazon promises its Elastic Transcoder “makes it easy to transcode video for smartphones, tablets, Web browsers and other devices.”  

Not having to worry about how the end user is going to see it makes the idea of producing online video for a variety of sources seem like a much better gig. Customers get 20 minutes of standard definition conversion free per month. Prices then range from 0.015 to 0.030 a minute, depending on other factors, according to a story on AET on slashgear.com.   

Is that a good deal? Well, Zencoder, a competitor in this space (which actually uses Amazon’s cloud to do its transcoding) on Wednesday commented briefly on Amazon’s new service on a “hacker news” blog and opined, “Amazon has done a good job of making their pricing look simpler/cheaper than ours, and for some customers, it is.” But the commenter said, “Our larger customers don’t pay more than this already.”  Supposedly, Zencoder will a more nuanced critique available today.

 Amazon says it can transcode a 10 minute video for an iPhone4 in five minutes, but it could take longer if there’s a lot of demands. The service operates regionally through pipelines that contains transcoding jobs. You can have up to four transcoding pipelines per AWS account, so you can transcode more than one job at a time. There’s a pretty comprehensive FAQ page that answers a lot of other questions.

It’s likely the Elastic Transcoder has the ability to be one of those vaunted “disruptive” developments that quickly change how business proceeds. Time, and competition will tell, though Amazon’s size is a daunting proposition for giant-slayers.

 “Video transcoding services like the ones being launched today are relevant both for professional producers but perhaps especially for more independent outfits that are looking for cost-effective solutions for small-scale projects. Amazon offers this service on an a la carte basis, making it particularly easy to use for the latter group, and startups in general,” writes Ingrid Lunden intechcrunch.com. Let the games begin.



Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/192273/watching-to-see-how-market-will-react-to-amazons.html#ixzz2JUUe9v5T


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Patrick Lopez's curator insight, January 30, 2013 3:01 PM

Cloud transcoding goes mainstream

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The DNA of the COO - report

In the The DNA of the COO, we uncover a compelling story of a wide-ranging role that still needs to fight to justify its existence, despite having a clear rationale.
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FFmpeg – the swiss army knife of Internet Streaming – part VI

The fabulous world of FFmpeg filtering

Transcoding is not a “static” matter, it is dynamic because you may have in input a very wide range of content’s types and you may have to set encoding parameters accordingly (This is particularly true for user generated contents).

Not only, the elaborations that you need to do in a video project may go beyond a simple transcoding and involve a deeper capacity of analysis, handling and “filtering” of video files.


Via Olivier NOEL
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Ericsson Adapts to the TV Streaming Challenge

Ericsson Adapts to the TV Streaming Challenge | Rec | Scoop.it

Ericsson AB (Nasdaq: ERIC) believes it has come up with a network-based approach to fix a bandwidth-sharing flaw with adaptive bit rate (ABR) streaming that tends to come into play when more than one video stream is delivered to the home.

The idea focuses on the familiar question of whether the intelligence behind a service belongs at the very edge -- the client device, in this case -- or deeper inside the network.

The problem with ABR is that the client device, such as a smartphone or tablet, is in charge of the bandwidth and isn't fair about how that capacity is allocated. If an iPhone is the first device on the home network to request a video stream, it will typically receive a high bit-rate version -- perhaps more than it really needs. Then, when a connected HD television requests a stream, it tends to get the scraps, resulting in a crummy-looking pixel-icious image.

After that, the devices typically end up battling over the available bandwidth, a situation that only worsens as more devices on the home network request streams. (See Adaptive Streaming's Primetime Challenge .)

Ericsson AB (Nasdaq: ERIC) is trying to solve the problem by applying Weighted Fair Queuing (WFQ), a data packet scheduling technique, to ABR streams. Rather than putting the client in control, Ericsson wants to put those smarts out on the network to define how bandwidth is shared among the devices in the home. The bit rate could be dialed up for video that's streamed to connected TVs or via game consoles, and pinched down for smaller screens, such as tablets or smartphones.

The result, if it works as advertised, will ensure that bandwidth is shared fairly and that each device gets the appropriately sized stream.

"The whole idea is that the network would have a voice in the size of the segments that are being sent, versus blindly sending what the client is asking for," says Jim Alexander, Ericson's senior director of solutions architecture.

Ericsson is trying to tackle this problem at an important time. Cable operators, for example, are starting to use ABR streaming to deliver video to IP-connected devices. They like it because ABR helps to avoid buffering and keeps the video flowing by adjusting bit rates on the fly as bandwidth levels fluctuate. But they'll become less enamored with the technology if they have limited control of the quality as more and more video streaming devices get attached to a subscriber's home network. (See Cable Adapting to Video's Streaming Future and Dish Makes Its Adaptive Streaming Move.)

Ericsson's approach would place control with proxy servers on the network, and would do so without deep packet inspection. In one scenario, the system could work in tandem with a simple dashboard that lets customers register devices and determine how they should be prioritized from a bandwidth perspective. The connected TVs in a given home would probably be at the top of such a list.

But creating such a dashboard will require some serious experimentation. Ericsson's WFQ-based approach is still in the "investigation stage," according to Brad Ferris, Ericsson's head of portfolio management for solution-area media, and the company isn't speculating on when it will be ready for prime time.

Ericsson will demonstrate what it's put together so far at next week's Society of Cable Telecommunications Engineers (SCTE) Cable-Tec Expo in Orlando.


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OTT costs?

OTT costs? | Rec | Scoop.it
A recent report by IHS Screen Digest predicts reveals that the costs of OTT will rise to uncompetitive levels when they need to be scaled up to broadcast volume levels: the reasoning being that traditional broadcasting is delivered via multicasting...

Via Olivier NOEL
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Nvidia exec says consoles will die

Nvidia exec says consoles will die | Rec | Scoop.it
Nvidia exec Phil Eisler says the next generation of consoles may very well be the last, as he believes cloud-based gaming is poised to supplant traditional console systems.


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Why Verizon wants to go over-the-top

Why Verizon wants to go over-the-top | Rec | Scoop.it

Verizon is working on launching a streaming subscription video service that could compete directly against online players like Netflix and Hulu Plus, according to Reuters.

 

But more importantly, the service could allow Verizon to deliver video services to customers that don’t live in its current footprint, and do so without an expensive network buildout.


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Encoding H.264 Video for Streaming and Progressive Download

Presentacion en formato PDF con gran catidad de informacion y detalles sobre codificacion y caracteristicas del h264...

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Overview of Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH)

Dynamic AdaptiveStreaming over HTTP (DASH)Christian Timmerer and Christopher MüllerAlpen-AdriaUniversität Klagenfurt (AAU)  Faculty of Technica...

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How to build a Netflix-like multiscreen OTT service (part 2) : panorama of available technical solutions

How to build a Netflix-like multiscreen OTT service (part 2) : panorama of available technical solutions | Rec | Scoop.it

Now that you intensively crawled through part 1 of this blog-post and asked yourself all the right questions intended to avoid common OTT-traps, we can safely presume that you are ready to spend some (or a lot of) time and money on launching your own multiscreen OTT service. So it’s definitely time to choose your bricks, mortar and trowels...

 

As multiscreen OTT/TV Everywhere offers do proliferate while each video tradeshow approaches and connected devices multiply, it’s difficult to monitor all of them and get a 100% accurate idea on who’s got the best offer. Basically your ideal technical partner will most likely be a unique target depending on your background (telco/content owner/TV channel…), your needs (target devices, business models, time to market…), your workflow constraints (CMS, billing, deployed transcoding engines, already deployed apps…) and your budget. Nevertheless, what I tried to do first is to isolate a list of actors whose offer is end-to-end and sufficiently versatile to cover the most common use cases and devices, then provide a complementary list with actors who provide less information but are also known in this market, and then wrap up the post with a bunch of ideas on how you could DoItYourself with less integrated/locking-in solutions. This way, you will end-up with a complete panorama of available technical solutions in mind.


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INFOGRAPHIC: Social Media Checklist for Business

INFOGRAPHIC: Social Media Checklist for Business | Rec | Scoop.it
People always ask us what basic things they can do on a day to day basis, to improve their social media presence on the top social communities.

 

Well the guys at the whole brain group have put together a great Infographic, that can be printed and used as your daily social media checklist for your business.

 

Check out 8 Ways to Improve Your Facebook Edgerank, Engagement, and Success if you are looking for a basic strategy to really improve your Facebook fanpage’s success.


Via Peter Azzopardi
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