Planned Parenthood, Social Media, and a Win for Women's Health - Huffington Post | English Article 2 | Scoop.it
New York TimesPlanned Parenthood, Social Media, and a Win for Women's HealthHuffington PostBut the organizational power of social media isn't the only notable element in the Komen decision.

 

Part A.

1. The basic subject of the article would be the outrage over the Susan G. Komen foundation's "fabricated" and political reasons to stop funding for Planned Parenthood. 

2. Huffington provides some points over the social media aspect over the descision, the hushed conversations that happened to make the descision, and interviews over the illeged rumors that are going on because of the act.  

3. She doesn't like the political background behind the descision, and she feels that the Komen foundation should tell the truth about everything.

4. She really does state her opinion; especially at the end of the article. It was mentioned like this, "But the most eloquent -- and gutsy and moving -- demand to keep politics out of women's health comes from the maker of this video, who, as she bares the scars from the surgery to treat the cancer she's still fighting, says: 'Do you see politics on my chest? Do you see Republican, Democrat, Tea Party or Independent anywhere on my chest? I don't.' Neither do I."

6. This columnist is very opinion based, but she does allow for some stories on both sides, just to even it out. 

7. This was written for a more involved reader and for a more feminist reader, or maybe not so feminist but more of a women involved in the fight for women's health.

8. Huffington does offer enough evidence to convince me to join her side on the matter. I did find a lot of opinion about negative things in the descision of the Komen foundation.

9. Huffington, Arianna. "Planned Parenthood, Social Media, and a Win for Women's Health." The Huffington Post. 7 Feb. 2012

 

Part B.

2. I think the way Huffington uses a lot of her quotes, helps give her article some informative background. Not only that, but it also helps her give more of a personal feel to it. Especially the way she uses the last interview, "she bares the scars from the surgery to treat the cancer she's still fighting, says: 'Do you see politics on my chest? Do you see Republican, Democrat, Tea Party or Independent anywhere on my chest? I don't.'" This shows more of the personal aspect of it all.