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Heroines of Literature and Film, You Don't Have to Be Pretty!

Heroines of Literature and Film, You Don't Have to Be Pretty! | Reading Power | Scoop.it

One more reason to love Divergent!

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Use Post-Its + Evernote For Ongoing Literacy Assessment

Use Post-Its + Evernote For Ongoing Literacy Assessment | Reading Power | Scoop.it
Evernote has partnered with Post-it notes. How could this apply to the classroom? Primarily, it can allow a teacher to digitize any notes they might write about their students on a Post-it into an ...
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Evernote is my absolute favorite app !

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K-12 Education in a Post-Literate Age

K-12 Education in a Post-Literate Age | Reading Power | Scoop.it
Students' inability to navigate books with ease is a painful example of the book's declining role in society, writes Christopher L. Doyle.
Reading Power's insight:

This is cannot be !

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Reading Power's curator insight, April 13, 2014 11:41 PM

It really doesn't have to be this way...

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Doing it Differently: Tips for Teaching Vocabulary - Edutopia

Doing it Differently: Tips for Teaching Vocabulary - Edutopia | Reading Power | Scoop.it

"Every Monday, my seventh grade English teacher would have us copy a list of 25 words she'd written on the board. We'd then look up the dictionary definitions and copy those down. For homework, we'd re-write each word seven times.

 

Good, now you know it. Test on Friday and never for those 25 words to be seen again. Poof. Old school, yes. Mundane task, yes. Did it work? I don't remember. Probably not."

 


Via John Evans
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Natalia Gantiva's curator insight, May 4, 2017 11:06 PM
A different point of view and techniques for teaching vocabulary to young learners.
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Vocab Minute

Vocab Minute | Reading Power | Scoop.it
Various test prep options available, pick one based on your own learning style: online, classroom, private tutoring.
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10000 Elyria students receive free comic books - The Morning Journal

10000 Elyria students receive free comic books - The Morning Journal | Reading Power | Scoop.it
10000 Elyria students receive free comic books
The Morning Journal
“We need to promote literacy. The only way to become a better reader is by practicing. What better books to practice with than comic books?
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learning during read-alouds | teach mama

learning during read-alouds | teach mama | Reading Power | Scoop.it
learning during read-alouds: critical thinking--how everyone can encourage it at home or in the classroom #weteach (RT @jenniferlagarde: Learning During Read-Alouds: Critical Thinking, New Literacies http://t.co/smBfn9L9...

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Telling kids to love their own skin

Telling kids to love their own skin | Reading Power | Scoop.it
Children's book author, blogger and mother of four Romina Garcia realises how important it is for kids to accept themselves and others.
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Where Are the People of Color in Children’s Books?

Where Are the People of Color in Children’s Books? | Reading Power | Scoop.it
I want to make them human in the eyes of readers — and in their own.
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A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: Happy 110th Birthday, Dr. Seuss! Updated Listing of 48 Websites!

A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: Happy 110th Birthday, Dr. Seuss! Updated Listing of 48 Websites! | Reading Power | Scoop.it

"Time to plan ahead! One week from this Monday is Dr. Seuss' birthday! As many of you know by now, my mega-holiday listing of teacher resources can be found in this posting."


Via Beth Dichter, Dr. McGee
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 25, 2014 8:23 PM

Students of all ages love Dr. Seuss stories, and this post provides a plethora of information including videos, coloring pages, printables, games, activities, and more.

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Teacher: To Enjoy Reading, Students Need More Time

Teacher: To Enjoy Reading, Students Need More Time | Reading Power | Scoop.it
Jennifer Rand, a high school teacher in State College, Pa., has come to the realization that a big reason why students today don't seem to share her own love of reading is that they are too simply too busy.
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Technology no substitute for reading time: Mem Fox

Technology no substitute for reading time: Mem Fox | Reading Power | Scoop.it
Leading children's author Mem Fox finds it ''heartbreaking'' to see small children left alone with smartphones and tablets to entertain themselves.

Via Sharon Furlong
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Which Country Reads the Most?

Which Country Reads the Most? | Reading Power | Scoop.it
According to the NOP World Culture Score Index, readers in India are making the rest of us look bad.
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Early literacy bill defines dyslexia for 1st time - KTVO

Early literacy bill defines dyslexia for 1st time - KTVO | Reading Power | Scoop.it
Early literacy bill defines dyslexia for 1st time KTVO Terry Branstad signed a bill into law Wednesday that effectively establishes a definition for the reading disability in Iowa code and offers professional support for teachers so they can better...
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27 Simple Ways To Check For Understanding - TeachThought

27 Simple Ways To Check For Understanding - TeachThought | Reading Power | Scoop.it

"The following infographic Mia MacMeekin offers up 27 additional ways to check for understanding. Some aren’t necessarily quick–”Test what you learned in a new situation”–but there are a dozen or more other ideas that are worth adding to your teacher toolbox, many of which aren’t content-related, but rather cognitively-related (Locate 3 people who agree with your point of view.) - See more at: http://havewww.teachthought.com/teaching/27-simple-ways-check-understanding/#sthash.KojI6Nqu.dpuf "


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Use Post-Its + Evernote For Ongoing Literacy Assessment

Use Post-Its + Evernote For Ongoing Literacy Assessment | Reading Power | Scoop.it
Evernote has partnered with Post-it notes. How could this apply to the classroom? Primarily, it can allow a teacher to digitize any notes they might write about their students on a Post-it into an ...
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Reading Power's curator insight, April 13, 2014 11:42 PM

Evernote is my absolute favorite app !

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27 Simple Ways To Check For Understanding - TeachThought

27 Simple Ways To Check For Understanding - TeachThought | Reading Power | Scoop.it

"The following infographic Mia MacMeekin offers up 27 additional ways to check for understanding. Some aren’t necessarily quick–”Test what you learned in a new situation”–but there are a dozen or more other ideas that are worth adding to your teacher toolbox, many of which aren’t content-related, but rather cognitively-related (Locate 3 people who agree with your point of view.) - See more at: http://havewww.teachthought.com/teaching/27-simple-ways-check-understanding/#sthash.KojI6Nqu.dpuf "


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5 questions every teacher should ask in class - Learn Egg

5 questions every teacher should ask in class - Learn Egg | Reading Power | Scoop.it
Here’s a great way to spark some discussion, increase engagement, and get your students learning. These five questions are simple and straightforward

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Really? You're Not in a Book Club? - New York Times

Really? You're Not in a Book Club? - New York Times | Reading Power | Scoop.it
Really? You're Not in a Book Club?
New York Times
... when you read a book in the company of others?
Reading Power's insight:

Yes, book clubs are still popular without Oprah.

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Click and Clunk-A 5 Step Reading Strategy for Students


Via Beth Dichter, Dr. McGee
Reading Power's insight:

This certainly infuses power in reading. What are some of your favorite strategies?

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:43 PM

This one page infographic provides a five step reading stategy for students using super heroes to help them become enaged. The five steps are:

Step 1: Preview the text for two to three minutes.

Step 2: Grab a pencil and read the passage aloud.

Step 3: What "clicked?"

Step 4: What "cluncked?"

Step 5: Put fix-up strategies into play.

Suggestions are provided in all but Step 2. Consider printing a copy of this out and using it as a poster in your room...or perhaps sending a copy home with students whom might need additional support!

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, March 20, 2014 8:25 AM

In our pursuit to make literacy skills accessible, this quick, 5-step infographic has appeal.  

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Study: Reading Literary Fiction Can Make You Less Racist

Study: Reading Literary Fiction Can Make You Less Racist | Reading Power | Scoop.it
New research finds a compelling narrative can help us sidestep stereotypes.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, March 16, 2014 2:47 PM

16 March 2014

 

An intriguing article about a study that "...suggests there’s something about well-written, sensitive fiction that draws us in and lets us identify with the characters—even if they’re from a foreign culture. This, in turn, short-circuits our tendency to stereotype."


The essence of the study revolves around the  variable controls in two recent studies summarized as follows:

 

__________

"Johnson and his colleagues describe two experiments that incorporated a 3,000-word extract from Shaila Abdullah’s 2009 novel Saffron Dreams. It revolves around “an educated and strong-willed Muslim woman, Arissa, who is assaulted in a New York City subway station,” the researchers write. The excerpt features “significant inner monologue that accentuates the protagonist’s strength of character while providing exposure to Muslim culture.”


Participants in the first experiment (68 Americans recruited online) read either the aforementioned excerpt, or a 500-word synopsis of the same scene. In the synopsis, “the descriptive language, monologue, and dialogue were removed to reduce the narrative quality,” 

__________


What is it about the removal or inclusion of descriptive language, monologue and dialogue that explains the difference between what readers absorb and contemplate and thereby "take-away" from a reading experience? 


It is implied, or at least I inferred, that there might be a tendency while reading literature to read with both our minds and our hearts, that is with our capabilities for logic and for empathy, causing what I have often referred to as the "3-Dimensionalization" of reading.


Fiction gently, but insistently, forces us to determine which characters we care about and what causes us to care or not care about them. It's a constant engagement with point and counter-point behaviors expressed by pro- and antagonist behaviors. We begin to  see examples of behaviors that exemplify a "character's Character" through his or her expressions of values, motives, and choices made when confronted by challenges to those values, motives, and choices made. And, we see them as expressed through the values, motives, an choices made by the peripheral characters all of whom bring additional dimensions to the reader's perceptions of the various plot intrigues that readers know is a fictional representation of the "truths" of human behaviors mirrored by those characters.

 

In fiction we become omnipotent yet caring spectators privy to more than just our own sense of right and wrong and levels of caring, but to multiple characters' senses of right and wrong and levels of caring. And in doing so, if the story is written well enough to maintain our engaged suspension of disbelief, we are constantly seeing our own values in light of the great and complex diversity of human behaviors that are driven by an equally great and complex diversity of forces driving not just our own but "all human value-driven behaviors."

 

It is the best of literature that is so engaging that it actually engages us in a sort of willing receptiveness to revisiting our own existing values, motives, and behaviors.And, in doing so, we become potentially more willing to adjust our receptiveness to the differences between ourselves and others.

 

Our attention then turns more towards whether or not we can appreciate  and consider adopting or rejecting the adoption of those differences once we have opened our receptiveness to revisiting the depth of our understanding of those who we had previously not given sufficient open-minded attention. We open ourselves to the vast gray areas distinguishing individuals within any group from the simplistic assumptions that come from the shallowness of black and white group defines the -driven behaviors.

 

We become open to the possibilities that human behaviors and values are better "judged" at the individual rather than group level and that it is that it is too simplistic to assume the individual's allegiance or patriotism, or alignment with large groups beliefs and values will drive that individual's behaviors in exactly the same direction as every other member of that group. Though peer pressure to not break ranks can be intense, we can come to appreciate that the individual is more than the group and group alignments are not the entirety of the individual. We con come to understand that there are those in the "other groups" with whom we have more in common than the differences defining the parameters of our group alignment.

 

Fiction can engage us in considering the myriad shades of gray in human behavior; behaviors that like it or not, are the sum total of our individual perceptions of what we believe to to be reasonable and our inevitable imperfection in balancing our selfish and selfless values-driven behaviors.

 

In spite of my moderate positions regarding portions of the Common Core Standards.for English Language Arts, I am a very strong proponent of the importance of both the skills associated with Informational reading and the benefits of engaged literary reading.

 

It IS important, no it is ESSENTIAL to appreciate the value of informational literacy. The entire human community can no longer run the risk of the anti-factual. Nor can we afford the damage caused by the well-intended but ill-informed; or the disinterested. or the superficially interested.

 

But spreadsheets and fact sheets alone can not tell the whole story. 

And, storytelling can not include all the facts. Each "adds" what the other can not do alone to one's "more complete" understanding of the human condition. 

 

Let's not allow the one to "trump" the other in importance. Facts without the synthesis of how the facts play out in the real world are as potentially dangerous as they are potentially beneficial.  Storytelling's strength is the ability to engage readers in an "entertaining" involvement in caring about how those facts play out in the real world. 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

 

 

 

 

 

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From Distant Admirers to Library Lovers–and beyond

From Distant Admirers to Library Lovers–and beyond | Reading Power | Scoop.it
A new typology of Americans’ public engagement with public libraries, which sheds light on broader issues around the relationship between technology, libraries, and information resources in the United States.
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Distinguished professor offers insight into complexity of children's literature - Kansas State Collegian

Distinguished professor offers insight into complexity of children's literature - Kansas State Collegian | Reading Power | Scoop.it
Distinguished professor offers insight into complexity of children's literature
Kansas State Collegian
Nel said children's and young adult literature is often more calculated than the unobservant eye may see.
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Audiobooks and the Return of Storytelling

Audiobooks and the Return of Storytelling | Reading Power | Scoop.it
We shouldn’t regard reading a book as more serious than hearing it out loud.

Via Sharon Furlong
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