Reading in School Systems
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Why Should You Try Game-Based Learning? - Edudemic

Why Should You Try Game-Based Learning? - Edudemic | Reading in School Systems | Scoop.it
This visual takes a look at how game-based learning activities are designed, why they work, and how well they work in classrooms. Keep reading to learn more.
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Why teachers should read more children’s books – Study

Why teachers should read more children’s books – Study | Reading in School Systems | Scoop.it

A research project has found that teachers who read for pleasure have better book knowledge and feel more confident, calm and stress-free in the classroomShould reading for pleasure be part of teacher training? Researchers say trainee teachers should be encouraged to read as part of their professional development.

Research has shown that there is value in helping teachers become reading role models for the pupils they teach, and that developing teachers’ subject knowledge of children’s literature can contribute to a child or young person’s enjoyment of reading.

As lecturers in initial teacher training on a PGCE primary programme, we believe that this habit should be developed as an integral part of teacher training. Teachers who read themselves and share their love of books in the primary classroom can, in turn, encourage children to read more.


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Tips and resources for supporting struggling readers

Tips and resources for supporting struggling readers | Reading in School Systems | Scoop.it
The Common Core State Standards Initiative focuses on rigor and raising expectation in classrooms nationwide. It calls for an increase in reading complexity for students of all ages.

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Lynnette Van Dyke's comment, September 1, 2013 5:23 PM
By Marisa Kaplan on February 8th, 2013 | Comments(3)



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The Common Core State Standards Initiative focuses on rigor and raising expectation in classrooms nationwide. It calls for an increase in reading complexity for students of all ages. As principals and teachers work hard to ensure their curricula are standards aligned, are struggling readers at risk of being left behind?
The 10th reading standard says that by the end of the year, students will read and comprehend texts at their respective grade level independently and proficiently. The first question to ask when familiarizing yourself with the standards: “What is grade level when it comes to reading?” This is a question that many special-education teachers and literacy coaches grapple with daily.
The common core website provides guidance on Page 4 of Appendix A, where readers will find a chart with updated information about text complexity by grade band and associate measures. Still, what’s “appropriate” for each grade level is not black and white and doesn’t fit neatly into a chart, especially when working with a wide range of readers.
As a classroom teacher, it is immensely challenging to ensure that all students get what they need at their level, especially in large classes. The pressure that comes with this increase of text complexity makes this even more difficult. Perhaps now more than ever, it is crucial that teachers are creative in finding ways to meet the needs of our readers, while ensuring that our curriculum is standards aligned. Some steps you can take to get there:
There is a common misconception that in fourth or fifth grade, teachers can stop teaching decoding. If you have students who are struggling in this area, make sure to find time to teach them how to improve decoding, no matter what grade level you teach. A great resource might be the first- or second-grade teacher in your building.
Give students an opportunity to read materials that are appropriate for them, even if the level does not fall within the grade band in Appendix A. This can be in addition to other texts that they read. If you are crunched for time, try incorporating an independent reading routine in class or for homework and use that time to have students reading at their level.
For students who are stronger at comprehension than decoding, try pairing them with a partner for decoding or having them listen to a text read aloud. That way, they can have access to higher-level texts with increasingly difficult vocabulary in a way that is appropriate for them.
Include a variety of reading techniques with your class. If you usually have students read independently, try reading a text aloud and focusing on comprehension. If you usually read aloud, try using centers so you can have certain readers using headphones and listening, while others read independently or in pairs. This variety will set you up for differentiation.
You know your learners. If the level of instruction doesn’t feel appropriate for your whole class, it is time to rethink the structure of instruction. That might mean teaching in small groups or revisiting certain strategies one-on-one with a student. Raising our expectations is a good thing, and being in tune to what students need can help us pinpoint exactly where our expectations should be.
Three additional resources that can help you support struggling readers:
ReadWorks.org: This website is free and provides access to nonfiction passages organized by grade level, skill or strategy, and keywords.
Scholastic Action magazine’s Differentiated Articles: This is an intervention magazine for grades 6 to 12, and the link offers differentiated articles at three Lexile levels so you can differentiate in your classroom.
BiblioNasium: This is a free, protected social network for children ages 6 to 12 designed to engage, encourage and excite young people about reading. It is used by parents and teachers.
Marisa Kaplan (@EdGeeks) is a special-education teacher and literacy coach in New York City. She has a master’s degree in learning disabilities and has taught in settings from early childhood to middle school. She writes a blog, EdGeeks, consults with local education technology startups and frequents educational meet-ups and conferences in the New York City area.
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Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual | Intervention Central

Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual | Intervention Central | Reading in School Systems | Scoop.it

Perhaps the most pressing challenge that schools face is that of ensuring that all children become competent readers. Young children who experience problems in reading quickly fall behind their more skilled classmates in their ability to decode and comprehend text. This gap in reading skills can emerge as early as first grade-and, once present, tends to be quite stable over time (Stanovich, 1986). First-grade teachers can predict with some confidence, for example, that those children in their classrooms with significant reading deficits by the end of the school year will very likely have continuing difficulties in reading in the fourth grade.

While the long-term negative impact of poor readers can be enormous, the good news is that schools can train their own students to deliver effective tutoring in reading to younger peers. Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual is a complete package for training peer reading tutors. Peer tutoring answers the nagging problem of delivering effective reading support to the many struggling young readers in our schools. Furthermore, peer tutoring programs can improve the reading skills of tutors as well as tutees (Ehly, 1986) and - in some studies-have been shown to build tutor's social skills as well (Garcia-Vazquez & Ehly, 1995). Young children tend to find the opportunity to read aloud to an older peer tutor to be quite reinforcing, adding a motivational component to this intervention.


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Book Buddies making reading fun at Webster - Watertown Daily Times

Book Buddies making reading fun at Webster - Watertown Daily Times | Reading in School Systems | Scoop.it
Book Buddies making reading fun at WebsterWatertown Daily TimesFrom 8:05 to 8:15 am the older kids read books to their younger buddies. At Webster, 15 pairs of students spread out in the cafeteria with 10 more pairs reading together in classrooms.
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The e-Book's the Thing

The e-Book's the Thing | Reading in School Systems | Scoop.it
Sixth-grade teacher Diane Gilbert was curious about introducing Shakespeare to her gifted and talented class at Kelly Mill Middle School in Blythewood, South Carolina.
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