Making math more meaningful by motivation and connections
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Meaningful Connections: Objectives and Standards

Meaningful Connections: Objectives and Standards | Making math more meaningful by motivation and connections | Scoop.it
As a new teacher, you are probably being asked how your learning objectives are linked to standards. You might even be asked to display your objectives and/or standards for each lesson. On top of tak
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My mentor always writes up the standard on the board in a question format so the students can know what specific math skill they will be learning and working on. My mentor always writes in a "How can I..." format so the students can ask themselves how they can, in example,   use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100. Also, my mentor always breaks down the standard before beginning a lesson that is based on a new standard. My mentor goes over the standard and makes it messy by underlining new math vocabulary or words that the students may not understand. She goes over each word and asks students to pronounce new vocabulary and guess the meaning as well. This helps students be more aware of what they are actually learning. Being more aware of what they are learning gives more meaning to the students.

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Good Time: 4 Ways to Reawaken Student Engagement

Good Time: 4 Ways to Reawaken Student Engagement | Making math more meaningful by motivation and connections | Scoop.it
Students want to be engaged in class. They really do -- but sometimes other things get in the way of their natural instincts. A few changes to how a teacher runs a classroom can make a huge impact on
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Nicholas Provenzano brought up some great ideas to create more engagement in the classroom. The reason why I looked up classroom engagement strategies is because I think it is a great motivational factor to get students to be more involved in the learning process. Of these ideas, I really love the student takeover and the open projects. The open projects remind me of the open-ended problems that I have been giving out to the students here and there in my placement field. I saw that due to the fact that the students had more choice when it came to solving the open-ended problem such as how to go about solving it and how to show their answer, they preferred this type of problem over a worksheet problem that had one standard answer. Open projects are similar in that they give students more choice, which encourages them to work on it because they can feel like they have control over their own learning. This goes back to one of the core teaching practices of allowing students to take charge of their learning. I think that is another way to motivate students and to get them to really be more involved in the lesson. This also gives students more responsibility since they are given the choices and it is ultimately up to them of how they go about solving the math problems or projects. What I want to try in the future is the student takeover. I really like how this approach has the students learn in a different way, which is by teaching the rest of the class. I think it would be great for elementary students to have that new perspective of learning even at that age. This will also show them learning is not all about teachers being in front of the classroom talking, but it can be the students themselves come up in front of the classroom and sharing their ideas or teaching a certain strategy.

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Books to Teach Children about Math TWEET

 FollowDeborah Diane‏@DeborahDian

Help for your kids: "Books to Teach Children about Math" http://www.squidoo.com/books-to-teach-children-about-math … #MathEducation #math #educations

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 FollowDeborah Diane‏@DeborahDian

Help for your kids: "Books to Teach Children about Math" http://www.squidoo.com/books-to-teach-children-about-math ;… #MathEducation #math #educations

 

This is a tweet that I found on Twitter (I had to copy and paste it because SCOOPIT doesn't allow me to share the tweet directly). Deborah Diane had shared a link of books that parents or teachers can use to help teach children about math. As I looked more into it, I liked how the article even breaks down and categorizes the books into certain grades such as preschool, elementary, and middle school. I think this is a useful resource for teachers and parents both to help make math more fun and also to connect math with literacy. As I looked through some of the book selection, I like how most of these books are picture books. I think the visuals are a great help for students to be more engaged and actually read about the mathematical concepts or facts that are mentioned in the text. I also like the fact of how teachers can use these books to teach math by reading a story. Students can realize that math aren't just worksheets and number or word problems. Math can be involved in stories, and even though the stories may be mostly fiction, these stories can be applicable in some way to real life situations.

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9 Strategies for Motivating Students in Mathematics

9 Strategies for Motivating Students in Mathematics | Making math more meaningful by motivation and connections | Scoop.it
Motivating students to be (enthusiastically) receptive is one of the most important aspects of mathematics instruction and a critical aspect of the Common Core State Standards. Effective teachers sho
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In this blog, Alfred Posamentier, talks about various strategies that teachers can implement to help boost students’ motivation in math. What I got from this post is that making connections with the students to the math that they are learning is vital and key to build or create their motivation. In example, I like how the article talks about getting the students curious and then challenging them. If the students get curious about a certain problem or how to go about solving it, then they would most likely be engaged during the learning process. Perhaps a fun way to start off a lesson is to have a question that deals with a topic that all of the students can relate with math and ask the students what they will need to know to figure it out. This can create curiosity as long as the students can make personal connections to the topic. I know that I need help in this area for my placements because I see certain students who give up easily when it comes to math. They are bright students, but they lose motivation and confidence when the lesson switches from language arts to math. I want to implement various strategies until I am able to motivate those students because they are more than capable of understanding the concepts if they are motivated to try.

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