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Break Out of that Writing Rut: Tell, Don't Show, and Write More of What You Love! via PHILOSBOOKS

Break Out of that Writing Rut: Tell, Don't Show, and Write More of What You Love!  via PHILOSBOOKS | reading | Scoop.it

Writing is hard work. You are faced with a blank sheet of paper. Don't let this stop you.


Via Penelope
Flurries Unlimited's insight:

 

This is a post from my website that I wanted to share with other authors who feel they are in a rut. This happens to all of us from time to time, but doesn't have to be a reason to be intimidated and stop writing.

 

There are a couple of books which helped me jump start my creative thought processes and begin writing again. The added benefit? I was also able to nearly double my written words when I did sit down to write.

 

I've summed up the process in 11 simple steps at the end.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://philosbooks.com/set-goal-writing-finish-booktg/

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♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, May 6, 2014 5:45 PM

Writing is love

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 6, 2017 12:38 PM
I try writing daily. It is a stream of consciousness process. I don't edit until later. I was surprised how challenging writing like this is, but have found it benefits my writing.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, October 21, 2017 1:48 PM
The 11 tips are practical i.e. write each day, first writings should be stream of consciousness, create lists, etc.
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20 Awesome DIY Science Projects to Do With Your Kids

20 Awesome DIY Science Projects to Do With Your Kids | reading | Scoop.it
Before the advent of the uber-popular show Mythbusters or the push for more STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) in schools, parents and their kids were doing at-home science experiments. Now, the trend continues to blossom, although many of the experiments have remained somewhat the same…and always awesomely exciting!

If you’re a parent and you want to do something with your kid that isn’t related to cleaning the toilets or forging through homework, check out these 20 great science projects that you can complete in the confines of your humble abode. Most of them use around-the-home items that you probably have on hand, although some will require a little bit of shopping ahead of time. To help you decide which are best for your children’s needs, the 20 have been divided into projects for younger students and projects for older ones.

Via John Evans
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, October 16, 2016 11:35 AM
Lots of fun things here to distract you from your capstone.  But these got me to wondering: could you easily create a "demo" version of all or a subset of your project in the form of a table top science experiment/demo?
GwynethJones's curator insight, October 16, 2016 1:51 PM

Love me some Science! #SciChat 

So, could ALL Science Experiments be thought of Makerspace?

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The giant rings of 'Mega Saturn' are spinning the wrong way (retrograde)

The giant rings of 'Mega Saturn' are spinning the wrong way (retrograde) | reading | Scoop.it

Astronomers first noticed the strange ring system in 2007. While observing a star called 1SWASP J140747, located in the Centaurus constellation about 420 light years from Earth. 

They noticed the star's light flickered as something passed in front of it, just like a solar eclipse. Analysis revealed a huge Saturn-like ring system with an massive object at the centre, which was named J1407b. The object is more massive than Jupiter (by about 80 times) and could be a giant planet or a brown dwarf, a type of star which failed to ignite.

 

In effect, the rings are circling J1407b against the grain, in the opposite direction to its orbit around the star. Crunching the numbers revealed that these types of retrograde ring systems can survive at least 10E5 years, or 100,000 years, producing eclipses that last for 56 days.

 

Dr Rieder told the New York Times: ‘If you have the planet moving clockwise and the rings moving counterclockwise, that is much more stable than if they move in the same direction, clockwise.’ 

 

But while the pair’s simulations may answer one question, it raises the issue of how the rings came to be spinning in the opposite direction from their orbit. Writing in a paper published this week in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics, they explain the answer could be the same reason why some of the planets in our own solar system have wonky orbits – collisions. They explain: ‘It is possible that such a collision between two rocky bodies in orbit around a planet results in a significant amount of retrograde moving material [around] J1407b, resulting in the rings we see today.’ 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Space is full of gigantic holes that are bigger than we expected

Space is full of gigantic holes that are bigger than we expected | reading | Scoop.it
In 1923, Edwin Hubble showed that the universe was far larger than expected by discovering that what we thought were swirls of gas on the edge of our own galaxy were actually galaxies in their own right: lonely “island universes” we could spot across an empty sea of black. That led to a comforting thought – we now know that even the darkest patch of sky, when seen through the telescope named after Hubble, is dotted with clumps of luminous stuff like our Milky Way.

But there’s another view of the universe, like the horror cliché of flipping an image to its photonegative. Since 1981, when astronomers found a vacant expanse called the Boötes void, we’ve also known that the universe has holes of cold, dark, lonely nothing that are larger than anyone expected. To truly understand the universe, we may have to gaze into the abyss.

Via Mariaschnee
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Kids Teaching the World

Kids Teaching the World | reading | Scoop.it
Leading #IMMOOC right now, once a week Katie Martin and I lead a YouTube live session for participants. Because our schedules are busy, we can not have a show at the same time each week, as…
Via Bobby Dillard
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6 Habits Of Trustworthy Leaders

6 Habits Of Trustworthy Leaders | reading | Scoop.it
The people in your office may not trust you as much as you think they do. Here's how to win them over.
Via Bobby Dillard
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7 Signs That Being A Manager Is Burning You Out

7 Signs That Being A Manager Is Burning You Out | reading | Scoop.it
Looking out for your team members is great, but not when you're so overworked that you stop looking out for yourself.
Via Bobby Dillard
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Secrets Of People With All The Time In The World

Secrets Of People With All The Time In The World | reading | Scoop.it
Some very busy people feel quite relaxed about time. Here's what they do that the rest of us don't.
Via Bobby Dillard
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Discovering Queen Elizabeth (and Duchess Kate's) Britain, one beauty recipe at a time!

Discovering Queen Elizabeth (and Duchess Kate's) Britain, one beauty recipe at a time! | reading | Scoop.it
Let's celebrate the magnificent Queen Elizabeth II's 90th birthday with some gorgeous vintage English beauty recipes. After all, that British peaches-and-cream complexion is the stuff of legend!

Via Anubha Charan
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Anubha Charan's curator insight, April 23, 2016 4:27 PM
No wonder the world is celebrating 90 years of this magnificent woman. Which set me to thinking: How do we pretty ladies, sitting thousands of miles from jolly Britain, join in the festivities? And being beauty-obsessed as I am, what could be better than digging out vintage English skincare recipes, going back to the 17th and 18th century world of Britain’s erstwhile royals? After all, the British love their traditions and their peaches-and-cream complexions have always been the stuff of legend. Just see Queen Elizabeth II – there is no way she looks 90!
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What does your tongue say about your health? Prepare to be seriously surprised

What does your tongue say about your health? Prepare to be seriously surprised | reading | Scoop.it
Reading the tongue has been a cornerstone of Chinese medicine, much like face mapping, and it's now getting a standing ovation by modern science as well.

Via Anubha Charan
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Cell Protein Offers New Hope in Fighting the Effects of Aging

Cell Protein Offers New Hope in Fighting the Effects of Aging | reading | Scoop.it
Summary: A new study could be the first step to developing drugs that targets carbonic anhydrase in mitochondria to help protect against aging and neurodegeneration.

Source: University of Nottingham.

A protein found within the powerhouse of a cell could be the key to holding back the march of time, research by scientists at The University of Nottingham has shown.

The discovery could offer a new target for drugs that may help to slow the debilitating effects of aging on our bodies.

And their research, published in the academic journal Aging, could have special significance for combatting age-related decline and halting the progression of neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease.

The work, led by Dr Lisa Chakrabarti and PhD student Amelia Pollard in the University’s School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, has centred on a family of proteins called carbonic anhydrase found within mitochondria — the cells’ ‘batteries’ which convert the oxygen we breathe into the energy (ATP) needed to power our body.

Via Mariaschnee
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A facelift for the Moon every 81,000 years

A facelift for the Moon every 81,000 years | reading | Scoop.it
The Moon is bombarded by so much space rock that its surface gets a complete facelift every 81,000 years, according to a study released Wednesday based on NASA data.

This churn—affecting the top two centimetres (nearly an inch) of mostly loose moon dust—happens 100 times more frequently than previously thought, scientists reported.

The study also estimates that asteroids and comets crashing into Earth's only natural satellite create, on average, 180 new craters at least 10 metres (33 feet) in diameter every year.

The findings, published in Nature, come from "before and after" pictures taken by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft, which has been mapping the Moon since 2009.

By comparing images of the same area at regular intervals, a team of scientists led by Emerson Speyerer from Arizona State University in Tempe were able to tally the number of new craters and extrapolate to the entire surface of the Moon.

Via Mariaschnee
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Proteins allow archaeologists to look further back in time

Proteins allow archaeologists to look further back in time | reading | Scoop.it
A group of scientists have developed a new method to sequence 3.8-million-year-old proteins. The new method, known as proteomics, makes it possible to analyse samples that are up to 40 million years old.

Via Mariaschnee
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Trace The Remarkable History Of The Humble Pencil

Trace The Remarkable History Of The Humble Pencil | reading | Scoop.it
The classroom writing implement has roots in exploding stars, the French Revolution, the British crown jewels and Walden Pond.

Via Mariaschnee
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BMW's Futuristic Artificial Intelligence Motorcycle Balances on Its Own

BMW's Futuristic Artificial Intelligence Motorcycle Balances on Its Own | reading | Scoop.it

The motorcycle of the future is so smart that it could eliminate the need for protective gear, according to automaker BMW.

To mark its 100th birthday, BMW has unveiled a number of concept vehicles that imagine the future of transportation. Possibly its most daring revelation, the so-called Motorrad Vision Next 100 concept motorcycle is so advanced that BMW claims riders wouldn't need a helmet.

 

The Motorrad Vision Next 100 would have a self-balancing system that keeps the bike upright both in motion and when still. BMW touted the motorbike's futuristic features, saying it would allow for riders of all skill levels to "enjoy the sensation of absolute freedom." According to the automaker, the Motorrad wouldn't require protective gear such as helmets and padded suits.

 

Another traditional feature was also missing from the concept: a control panel. Instead, helmetless riders would wear a visor that acts as a smart display. "Information is exchanged between rider and bike largely via the smart visor," BMW said in a statement. "This spans the rider's entire field of view and provides not only wind protection but also relevant information, which it projects straight into the line of sight as and when it is needed." Such information would not be needed all the time because drivers will be able to hand over active control of the vehicle at points; the Motorrad and other Vision Next 100 vehicles would be equipped with self-driving technology, according to BMW.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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European-led Mars lander to start descent on Red Planet

European-led Mars lander to start descent on Red Planet | reading | Scoop.it
A Mars lander is due to leave its mothership and head toward the Red Planet's surface to test technologies for Europe's first planned Mars rover, which will search for signs of past and present life.

 

After a seven-month journey from Earth as part of the European-Russian ExoMars program, the Schiaparelli lander is expected to separate from spacecraft Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) on October 20 and start a three-day descent to the surface. Schiaparelli represents only the second European attempt to land a craft on Mars, after a failed mission by the British landing craft Beagle 2 in 2003.

 

Landing on Mars, Earth's neighbor some 56 million kilometers away, is a notoriously difficult task that has bedevilled most Russian efforts and given NASA trouble as well. The United States currently has two operational rovers on Mars, Curiosity and Opportunity. But a seemingly hostile environment has not detracted from the allure of Mars, with US President Barack Obama recently highlighting his pledge to send people to the planet by the 2030s.

 

Elon Musk's SpaceX is developing a massive rocket and capsule to transport large numbers of people and cargo to Mars with the ultimate goal of colonising the planet, with Mr Musk saying he would like to launch the first crew as early as 2024.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Can 'Westworld' Do for Science Fiction What 'Game of Thrones' Did For Fantasy?

Can 'Westworld' Do for Science Fiction What 'Game of Thrones' Did For Fantasy? | reading | Scoop.it
Promising early episodes might not transcend their genre as magnificently as the fantasy saga does, but HBO's newest epic is off to a great start.
Via TechinBiz
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Revisiting: The Editorial Fallacy

Revisiting: The Editorial Fallacy | reading | Scoop.it
Revisiting Joe Esposito's 2010 post on the disruptive publishing environment, in which publishers cannot rely on a purely editorial strategy, as many of the issues now facing them are not editorial in nature.
Via Marianela Camacho Alfaro
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Want To Be More Productive And Creative? Collaborate Less

Want To Be More Productive And Creative? Collaborate Less | reading | Scoop.it
Collaboration has defined the world of work for decades. This former IDEO designer says these days, it's showing its limits.
Via Bobby Dillard
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The One Surprising Person Your Work Team Desperately Needs

The One Surprising Person Your Work Team Desperately Needs | reading | Scoop.it
The ad agency Walton Isaacson takes a page from Civil Rights leader Bayard Rustin in order to keep teams innovating.
Via Bobby Dillard
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Leadership Is About Emotion

Leadership Is About Emotion | reading | Scoop.it

Make a list of the 5 leaders you most admire. They can be from business, social media, politics, technology, the sciences, any field. Now ask yourself why you admire them. The chances are high that your admiration is based on more than their accomplishments, impressive as those may be. I’ll bet that everyone on your list reaches you on an emotional level.

 

This ability to reach people in a way that transcends the intellectual and rational is the mark of a great leader. They all have it. They inspire us. It’s a simple as that. And when we’re inspired we tap into our best selves and deliver amazing work.

 

So, can this ability to touch and inspire people be learned? No and yes. The truth is that not everyone can lead, and there is no substitute for natural talent. Honestly, I’m more convinced of this now – I’m in reality about the world of work and employee engagement. But for those who fall somewhat short of being a natural born star (which is pretty much MANY of us), leadership skills can be acquired, honed and perfected. And when this happens your chances of engaging your talent increases from the time they walk into your culture.

 

Via The Learning Factor, Bobby Dillard
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Cameron Larsuel's curator insight, October 17, 2016 6:27 PM

Leadership is emotion, leadership is energy, leadership is you.

Matthias von Wnuk-Lipinski's curator insight, October 18, 2016 3:09 AM
Leadership and Emotion
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Why sex is good for your skin. And hair. AND it's all backed by science!

Why sex is good for your skin. And hair. AND it's all backed by science! | reading | Scoop.it
The experts agree: sex has amazing skincare benefits. Check out why getting frisky may be the best thing you've done for your complexion in a long time.

Via Anubha Charan
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Anubha Charan's curator insight, July 9, 2016 3:45 PM
Um? Uh? What? Because… WHAT?
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A Revolutionary Dental Discovery: New Stem Cell Fillings Allow Teeth to Regenerate

A Revolutionary Dental Discovery: New Stem Cell Fillings Allow Teeth to Regenerate | reading | Scoop.it
The team behind the new discovery have earned a prize from the Royal Society of Chemistry for what judges called a “new paradigm for dental treatments.”

Scientists from the University of Nottingham and Harvard have revolutionized the way we treat dental problems such as the need for a root canal. Allowing teeth to heal themselves, the stem cells actually regenerate the tooth. This in turn could get rid of the need for expensive procedures and invasive drilling and/or fillings.

Via Mariaschnee
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Scientists reveal how a little-known amoeba engulfed a bacterium to become photosynthetic

Scientists reveal how a little-known amoeba engulfed a bacterium to become photosynthetic | reading | Scoop.it
About 100 million years ago, a lowly amoeba pulled off a stunning heist, grabbing genes from an unsuspecting bacterium to replace those it had lost.

Now Rutgers and other scientists have solved the mystery of how the little amoeba, Paulinella, committed the theft. It engulfed the bacterium, kept that cell alive and harnessed its genes for photosynthesis, the process plants and algae use to convert carbon dioxide into oxygen and sugar via solar energy.

"The major finding of the study is the microbial world, which we know is full of valuable genes, can move these genes between organisms according to need," said Debashish Bhattacharya, a study co-author and distinguished professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources at Rutgers. "When a microbe has a gene deficit, it can in some cases fill that deficit by grabbing the same gene from the environment. This shows how fluid microbial genomes really are."

"But people should not get the idea that humans will be grabbing bacterial genes any time soon, because they have a sequestered (protected) germ line," said Dana C. Price, a study co-author and associate research professor in the Department of Plant Biology and Pathology in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. "This is about microbial life such as bacteria and single-celled eukaryotes."

The international study by U.S. and German scientists was published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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First birds made honking sounds more than 66 million years ago

First birds made honking sounds more than 66 million years ago | reading | Scoop.it
A new fossil discovery has shown that birds developed the unique vocal organ that enables them to sing more than 66 million years ago when dinosaurs were around

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Genetic profiling of cancer tumours opens up new treatment options

Genetic profiling of cancer tumours opens up new treatment options | reading | Scoop.it
A cancer tumour that has been through all forms of medical treatment may seem indestructible, but scientists are busy finding new weaknesses. A genetic study of tumours in almost 500 cancer patients may identify new points of attack for future treatments.

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