Raspberry Pi
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Raspberry Pi
A complete ARM GNU/Linux computer for $25.
(also covering Arduino and BeagleBone)
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Collection with Raspberry Pi and USB barcode scanner

Collection with Raspberry Pi and USB barcode scanner
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The BBC's new Micro:bit computer will 'inspire a generation to code' 

The BBC's new Micro:bit computer will 'inspire a generation to code'  | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The BBC has dispatched up to 1 million of the micro:bit, its credit card-sized computers, to all children in Year 7 across the UK. The micro:bit, which is the modern descendant of the 1980s mini-computer the BBC micro, is a small, low cost computer designed to teach children how to code. It is made up of processors and sensors - the raw materials of a computer -but can be programmed in a number of ways. The goal is to teach kids to program and create their own games on the tiny device. "We wanted to try to create something that would ultimately help tackle the skills gap in the UK when it comes to the tech sector," said Sinead Rocks, the head of the BBC micro:bit project. "Children have many devices. They’re used to using tablets and smartphones. We wanted to do something that transformed them from being passive users, to teach them something about what they use on a daily basis." Up to one million of the devices are being given for free to all year seven pupils across the UK, including those who are home schooled, at private schools, and at state schools. The micro:bit was supposed to be released back in September, but delayed five months due to hardware issues and problems with the power supply. However, the children will permanently own the computers, so the delay on the micro:bit's release doesn't affect the pupils' time with it, said Rocks. What can I do with my BBC micro:bit? The micro:bit is similar to the Raspberry Pi, but is designed to be an entry level product for children that don't have any previous experience, or even interest, in coding. "It creates that first step for children who may not have known that they had an interest in coding," said Rocks. It has 25 red LED lights, and children can code it so text or designs are projected onto the lights, displaying messages. It also has Bluetooth capability, edge connectors, an accelerometer, a built-in compass, and a magnetometer. The micro:bit can be programmed to become anything from a game to a smart watch or fitness tracker. It can be connected to other devices like a television, to sensors, and even computers, such as the Raspberry Pi and Arduino. Teachers, who received micro:bits ahead of the children and who have started experimenting with them, have created games, used the bluetooth function to control an MP3 player, and connected it to headphones, according to Rocks. One class sent a micro:bit into near space in a weather balloon, and another created a limbo pole using its motion sensor. It has also been used to measure the dampness of soil, and to create a selfie remote control. "We wanted to create something that would surprise us," said Rocks. "It's really been gratifying to see that happening so early on in the initiative in the variety of ways it's already being used." The BBC partnered with 31 companies on the Make It Digital project, including technology giants Samsung and Microsoft, are running workshops on how to use the device. Samsung has also released an app that lets owners code on the go. And the BBC will be holding a series of live lessons on its website about how to use the computer. How is it different from the BBC micro? The micro:bit takes inspiration from the BBC micro of the 1980s. "Our ultimate ambition was to create something that had the same sense of energy and ambition that the micro did in the 80s," said Rocks. The micro:bit is smaller, faster, lighter and more adaptable than the micro was. "It's a replacement fit for this new tech era that we're in." The BBC micro came out when computing was a fairly new concept, and was designed to teach the UK what computers could be used to achieve. Now, the power of computers is ubiquitous, but most people don't understand how to control them, how the back end works. This is where the micro:bit comes in. "The BBC micro:bit has the potential to be a seminal piece of British innovation" Tony Hall, Director-General, BBC "The BBC micro started me on my journey towards a career in technology and the BBC micro:bit can have the same effect on children receiving their devices from today," said Simon Segars, chief executive of ARM, the Cambridge-based company who's hardware and software development kits were used to create the micro:bit. "The ability to code is now as important as grammar and mathematics skills and it can unlock important new career options. I can easily imagine a new wave of design entrepreneurs looking back and citing today as the day their passion for technology began." The hardware and much of the software behind the micro:bit will soon be made open source, and the devices will also go on sale to the general public. "The BBC micro:bit has the potential to be a seminal piece of British innovation, helping this generation to be the coders, programmers and digital pioneers of the future," said Tony Hall, the director general of the BBC. 10 things you can build using a Raspberry Pi For a round-up of technology news and analysis, sign up to our weekly Tech Briefing here.
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Max2Play - Next Level Raspberry Pi OS

This video shows you exactly why Max2Play is a great control solution for your new Raspberry Pi! If you always wanted to use a Pi for your media center or hifi system, then look no further. Its functionality can easily be extended through plugins, provided both by our us and our great community. Why would you want over-night sessions and complicated programming in the console, when there is already Max2Play doing the work for you?NEW! Now supporting Raspberry Pi 3, Raspberry Pi Zero and bluetooth devices.What is Max2Play?The community project Max2Play offers an easy-to-use browser interface and control center that assists users with little or even no Linux knowledge. Max2Play is based on Raspian and serves as a multifunctional and flexible configuration tool for several use cases.Focusing on audio solutions, it offers a simple installation process for various AMPs and DACs for Raspberry Pi (e.g. HiFiBerry DAC+, HiFiBerry Digi+ or IQaudIO Pi-AMP+), a fast configuration of multiroom audio with a Squeezebox server, touchscreen control via Jivelite and much more.You would like to learn more about Max2Play? Please visit our website:http://www.max2play.com/en/All Max2Play Images and Plugins are available here:http://www.max2play.com/en/max2play-i...http://www.max2play.com/en/addons/If you have any questions, need help or have ideas, become part of our Max2Play Community and share your thoughts in our forums:http://www.max2play.com/en/forums/Visit our Facebook Page and Blog to learn about new features we add to Max2Play:https://www.facebook.com/Max2Play-817....http://www.max2play.com/en/category/g...Our latest Max2Play project is a Raspberry Pi assembly kit with High-End Sound and 7 Inch Touch Display. Have a look at our Instructable here:http://www.instructables.com/id/High-...
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$50 Raspberry Pi AIS-Receiver - How to

This might not be the most in depth guide but hopefully it will point you in the right direction of how to build yourself a cheap AIS-receiver from a Raspberry Pi and a DVB-T dongle for less than $50.Follow the steps in the guide and you'll have a working AIS-receiver.First of all, and MOST IMPORTANTLY make sure to buy a dongle with a compatible chip! 1. Check out the following link to see which chips that works:http://sdr.osmocom.org/trac/wiki/rtl-sdr2. Download rtl_ais from github:https://github.com/dgiardini/rtl-aisFollow the instructions, and make sure to calibrate the PPM to offset the internal error of your dongle. You can use rtl_fm from this page and then use rtl_test:http://sdr.osmocom.org/trac/wiki/rtl-... or Kalibrate https://github.com/steve-m/kalibrate-rtl3. Download kplexhttp://www.stripydog.com/kplex/4 Set it all up according to the video and you should be fine.You can download OpenCPN for free from the following link:http://opencpn.org/ocpn/
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Monitor Data From Anywhere With Arduino & the Adafruit FONA - Open Home Automation

In some situations, you could want to monitor a project remotely, and we all know that’s quite easy to do using an Arduino board & an Internet connection. However, a WiFi or Ethernet connection is not always available, for example in a secondary home in the countryside, or a mountain cabin. This is where this project comes into play: in this article, you are going to learn how to send measurement data via GPRS (cellular data), using the Adafruit FONA shield & Arduino. This way, you’ll be able to monitor projects remotely even if no Internet connection is available. Let’s start! Hardware & Software Requirements We are first going to see what components are required for this project. Of course, you’ll need an Arduino board. I used an Arduino Uno board here. The most important component of this project is of course the GSM/GPS shield. I used an Adafruit FONA 808 breakout board for this project: This is a very convenient piece of hardware as it integrates everything you need for your projects: a GSM/GPRS chip, as well as a GPS receiver. Note that in some countries, the plan is to stop the GPRS/GSM network in the future. In that case, you could perfectly use the 3G version of this board, which would work just as well for this project. Then, you’ll need a SIM card, in the ‘classic’ SIM card format. If you only have a micro or nano SIM card, you’ll need to use an adapter. Also, make sure that the SIM card is activated with at least some data available. For this project, I used a very cheap prepaid SIM card with about 10 MB of credit available on the card. You will also need a GSM/GPRS antenna, and a GPS antenna, that you can also get from Adafruit. I also used a simple DHT11 sensor for this project. As the shield is taking a lot of power, it needs an external battery to function properly. For that, I used a standard 3.7V LiPo battery with a JST connector. Finally, you will a breadboard and some jumper wires to make the required connections. This is the list of all the components that I used for this project: Arduino Uno Adafruit Fona 808 breakout + GSM uFL antenna + GPS antenna DHT11 sensor GSM SIM card with GPRS data available 3.7V LiPo battery LiPo battery charger Breadboard Jumper wires On the software side, you will need to have the latest version of the Arduino IDE, which you can find at: https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/Software You will also need the latest version of the Adafruit FONA library, which you can get using the library manager inside the Arduino IDE. Hardware Configuration We are now going to assemble the hardware of this project. We’ll set up the breakout board, and then assemble it to the Arduino board. The first step is to open up the FONA board so you can insert the SIM card. Then, simply insert the SIM inside the board and close the tray again. After that, put the GPRS antenna and the GPS antenna on the board. We are now going to connect the FONA board to the Arduino board. First, place the FONA board on the breadboard. Then, connect the different pins of the FONA board as follows: Vio connects to 5V of the Arduino board GND connects to GND Key connects to GND as well RX connects to digital 2 of the Arduino board TX connects to digital 3 of the Arduino board RST connects to digital pin 4 of the Arduino board For the DHT11 sensor, connect the first pin of the sensor to VCC of the Arduino board, the second pin to pin 7 of the Arduino board, and finally the last pin of the sensor to GND. Once that’s done, this is how it should look like: Finally, before moving on to the next section, make sure to connect the battery to the FONA board. Logging Data Online We are now going to use the GPRS connection to log data online, using a service called Dweet.io. Then, we’ll even use a website to display this data graphically. Of course, this assumes that you have a mobile Internet access where the project will be located. But that’s perfect to monitor data in a location where there is mobile Internet, but where you don’t want to install a regular Internet access. As the code is quite complex, I’ll only highlight the most important parts, but you can of course find the complete code on the GitHub repository of the project. First, we need to define a ‘thing’ name on Dweet.io, which is a virtual object that will hold all the measurement data: String yourThing = "8g62og"; Then, we activate the GPRS module on the board: if (!fona.enableGPRS(false)) Serial.println(F("Failed to turn off")); delay(1000); if (!fona.enableGPRS(true)) Serial.println(F("Failed to turn on")); delay(1000); After that, in the loop() function of the sketch, we send the measured data to Dweet.io, by making a GET request to the server: uint16_t statuscode; int16_t length; String url = "http://dweet.io/dweet/for/"; url += yourThing; url += "?temperature="; url += String(temperature); url += "&humidity="; url += String(humidity); char buf[80]; url.toCharArray(buf, url.length()); Serial.print("Request: "); Serial.println(buf); We also read back the answer and display it inside the Serial monitor. We also wait for one minute before sending data again: if (!fona.HTTP_GET_start(buf, &statuscode, (uint16_t *)&length)) { Serial.println("Failed!"); } while (length > 0) { while (fona.available()) { char c = fona.read(); Serial.write(c); length--; } } fona.HTTP_GET_end(); // Wait delay(60 * 1000); It’s now time to test the project! Grab the code the GitHub repository of the project at: https://github.com/openhomeautomation/monitor-data-arduino-fona Make sure to change the name of the ‘thing’ inside the code. Then, upload the code to the board, and open the Serial monitor. You should see the following inside the Serial monitor: If you can see this ‘succeeded’ message, it means the data was correctly uploaded to the server. You can now check it by going to the following URL: https://dweet.io/get/latest/dweet/for/my-thing-name You will get the last measurement inside your web browser: This means that you are now able to log data from your project, without a WiFi or Ethernet connection! Monitor Data From Anywhere But you can do more than that: we are now going to see how to display this data graphically. To do so, we’ll use a platform called Freeboard.io. This platform allows you to create free online dashboards for your projects, and interfaces nicely with Dweet.io. First, create a free account at: http://freeboard.io/ Now, create a new dashboard, and create a new source inside this dashboard with the following parameters: Of course, you need to insert your own thing name here. After that, you should see the source inside your dashboard, and when it was last updated: Now, we’ll create a widget to display the temperature. Create a new Pane, and inside this a new Gauge widget with the following data: Now, create the same for the humidity data. This should be the final result: Congratulations, you can now log data using your FONA board, and also monitor this data graphically from anywhere in the world! You can of course now adapt this project and build your own monitoring projects with it. You can for example log the data coming from several different boards to Dweet.io, and monitor all the data within a single dashboard. With that, you can monitor data in several location that don’t have a WiFi or Ethernet access. If you want to learn more about building similar projects with Arduino & the FONA board, I recommend checking the book that I wrote on the topic: GSM & GPS Projects With Arduino.
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ATtiny85 no FTDI ? ? ?

ATtiny85 no FTDI ? ? ? | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Domino60, that picture that you showed us is not ATtiny85 that's a Digispark's USB development board based on ATTiny85 chip. I believe it comes with bootloader (maybe V-USB based, I have no idea) that enables flashing it via USB and special config files for Arduino IDE. If you want to use bare ATtiny85 chip in your project it's best if you update it via ISP. Also FTDI relies on serial (UART) ports of ATmega328p. Attiny doesn't have any hardware UART ports...
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how the device works, features, and coding languages (Wired UK) | Information Society

how the device works, features, and coding languages (Wired UK) | Information Society | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The BBC has finally started deliveries of its micro:bit pocket sized computers to school children around the country, months later than originally planned. Micro:bit is a small codeable computer that is aimed to encourage pupils to learn basic programming skills. The device is a modern take on the BBC Micro, which was used by millions of school children in the 1980s. The corporation originally intended to give micro:bit to all Year 7 school children — aged 11 or 12 — when they started school in September, but the rollout of the device was pushed back due to design and manufacturing issues. The BBC says that all one million pupils will receive their devices in the coming weeks. In the package that students and their teachers will receive will be a micro:bit, USB, cable and a battery holder. As well as 25 on-board LEDS the device has two programmable buttons, which the BBC says can be used to “control games or pause and skip songs on a playlist”. A ‘compass’ built onto the card is able to detect the direction it is moving in and can be coupled with data from the micro:bit’s accelerometer. There are three input/output pins on the bottom of the device and it also comes with Bluetooth Low Energy, to allow communication with external machines. The BBC says that those with a smartphone will be able to send code directly from the phone to the micro:bit. After the rollout of the device the BBC says the hardware and “much of” the software will be open-sourced and available to buy from retailers. The micro:bit’s retail price is unknown currently, but it may be in line with the Raspberry Pi Zero. The £4 hardware from Raspberry Pi was launched in January and sold all 100,000 initial units within days of its launch. Microbit.co.uk has tutorials for teachers and students touching on basic JavaScript, Microsoft Block Editor, Microsoft Touch Develop, and Python. These allow children to learn more about the programming languages, create projects or watch a number of videos showing how the system works. “The BBC micro:bit has the potential to be a seminal piece of British innovation, helping this generation to be the coders, programmers and digital pioneers of the future” BBC director-general Tony Hall said, as the devices were launched.
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Raspberry Pi 3: Raspbian Linux and NOOBS Distributions Updated | Linux.com

New releases of Raspbian GNU/Linux and the NOOBS installer package appeared on the Raspberry Pi Downloads page last week. These have come very soon after the initial Pi 3 support releases, so they appear to be primarily aimed at bug fixes and enhancements for the new hardware. The Raspbian release notes mention that there are firmware and kernel updates. I couldn't find any release notes or other information about the NOOBS release; hopefully that will come along soon. I have loaded and briefly tested both Raspbian and NOOBS on all of my various Raspberry Pi systems. The best news of this release is that the NOOBS installer now recognizes the Raspberry Pi 3 built-in wireless network adapter, so it is now possible to install from NOOBS on a Raspberry Pi 3 without having to use a wired network connection or a second wireless adapter.   Read more at ZDNet News
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How to get started with the BBC Micro Bit

How to get started with the BBC Micro Bit | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
There seems to be an influx of devices claiming that they will change the future of Computing education. From the Arduino to the Raspberry Pi we now have a plethora of choices when it comes to getting started with physical computing. But in late 2014 there was a rumour that the BBC were keen to emulate the success of the UK's 1980s coding scene, which was led by the BBC Micro, their own micro computer. In 2011 there were a number of reports from Education advisers and Members of Parliament that the UK was now falling behind in Computer Science and that many children believed that the roles on offer meant relocating to another country. This was prevalent in the gaming industry, where the UK maintains sixth position, but with a decline in the number of developers originating from the UK. So in 2015 when the BBC announced that they would be partnering with a number of hardware, software and service suppliers to deliver a single board micro-controller powered platform, the Education sector stood up and listened. The goal of the micro:bit project was not to introduce just another single board computer or micro-controller, rather the goal is to disrupt. Put a device into the hands of children and teachers that has zero cost but maximum impact. The micro:bit is designed to work with mobile devices to spur classroom creativity, and with the micro:bit anyone can make their own smart device with very little code. Supported by the BBC and a number of service providers, the micro:bit has projects and documentation that has been designed to fit into the UK Computing curriculum. The hope of all the project partners is to rekindle the successes of the 1980s and help children to learn how rewarding Computer Science can be, with aims to generating new job roles in the future. Getting Started with Micro Python For this project you will need to connect your micro:bit to a Linux machine or Raspberry Pi. You'll also need an LED, 220 Ohm Resistor (RED-RED-BROWN-GOLD) and three Crocodile clips. In physical computing the "Hello World" introduction is traditionally to control an LED (Light Emitting Diode). This helps to test that the board and components are working correctly before we progress to something more challenging. We begin by downloading the Python software known as Mu. Ensure that you have the latest version of the software for your OS. You will need to make the downloaded file executable, in most Linux distros you can right click on the file and select "Properties" and from there make the file executable. If you prefer the terminal then you can do the following: $ chmod +x NAME OF DOWNLOADED FILE Now open the Mu application by double clicking on the downloaded file. The Mu editor looks basic but is constantly being worked on by members of the Python Software Foundation. You can see a row of buttons across the editor; pay particular notice to Flash and Repl. Flash is used to Flash your code on to an attached micro:bit, where as Repl (Read Eval Print Loop) is used to interactively hack with the micro:bit. We shall start our project by writing a few lines of code that will flash an LED on and off with a half second gap between each state. In the top windows we import the entire micro:bit Python library with: from microbit import * Now we create an infinite loop, which will contain the code that we wish to run while True. Inside of the loop, the next line of code is indented, as per Python's requirement to show that this code is inside of the loop. First we change the state of pin 0, which is currently turned off. To turn on the pin we set it to be 1. Then we sleep for half a second, before turning pin 0 off, using 0, then we sleep for half a second to create a seamless loop. You'll notice that we did not import the time library, yet we are using the sleep function. This is because Micro Python has its own sleep function inside of the micro:bit library that uses milliseconds for duration, with 500 equalling half a second. pin0.write_digital(1) sleep(500) pin0.write_digital(0) sleep(500) With the code written, it is time to flash the code on to the attached micro:bit. Click on Flash and wait until the yellow LED on the reverse of the micro:bit stops flashing. With the code loaded on to the micro:bit now we will connect the components. Attach one side of a crocodile clip to pin 0 and the other to the long leg of an LED. Connect another crocodile clip to the GND of the micro:bit and then attach the other end to one leg of a resistor. On the other resistor leg attach another crocodile clip and then attach it to the short leg of the LED. You should now see the LED flash if not, then check your wiring is correct by removing the crocodile clip from pin 0 and attach it to 3V. If the LED lights up then the wiring is correct. Enjoyed this article? Expand your knowledge of Linux, get more from your code, and discover the latest open source developments inside Linux Format. Read our sampler today and take advantage of the offer inside.
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BBC hands out tiny Micro Bit computer to thousands of children in the UK today

BBC hands out tiny Micro Bit computer to thousands of children in the UK today | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Today, the BBC finally hands out the Micro Bit, a small computer designed to encourage programming, to thousands of UK schoolchildren. The eye-catching initiative was announced in July last year, but only now are the tiny computers being sent out - later in the school year than originally planned. The BBC worked with Microsoft, Samsung, ARM and other companies to create the device, which is designed for Year Sevens (11-12-year-olds). The name is a nod to the 1980s BBC Micro computer, and the device is a part of the BBC's 2015 Make it Digital initiative, which is designed to help inspire kids to get into science, technology and engineering. From today up to one million BBC Micro Bits are being delivered free to every year seven student in England and Wales, year eight student in Northern Ireland and S1 student in Scotland. They are the students' devices to own. This allows students to keep their device as they move up through the school. The Micro Bit is 4cm by 5cm and comes in a range of colours. It has red LEDs that light up and two programmable buttons, so it works as a basic game controller. It also works with other devices via Bluetooth, such as the equally little Raspberry Pi. It's meant to be programmed via a website designed by Microsoft, rather than connected to a keyboard and screen. It can be made to flash its LEDs in sequence and take readings from built-in sensors. But when it's added to other hardware it can do much more. One school launched their copy more than 20 miles into the air. Pupils at Rishworth School in West Yorkshire wrote a program that used a heat sensor to log changes in temperature and show the current reading on the computer's LEDs. They then attached the kit to a helium balloon and let it fly upwards. Students from London's Highgate School used the Micro Bit to help people with autism recognise other people's emotional states. They coded the computer so a user could scroll through a series of graphics, shown via the LEDs, of faces presenting different moods. When they found a match they could press another button to make the LEDs state what the image represented - for example "happy", "sad" or "angry". Are you a parent with a child set to receive a BBC Micro Bit? The BBC has set up a website for teachers and parents with guides for getting started and safety tips.
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R-Kade Zero • The gaming controller for the Raspberry Pi Zero!

R-Kade Zero • The gaming controller for the Raspberry Pi Zero! | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
R-Kade Zero is one of the smallest and minimalist gaming controllers around. If you add a tiny Raspberry Pi Zero and a case and you’ve built yourself a tiny video gaming platform. The central idea to this is an interchangeable gaming controller gives the player a choice for their favourite style of play. You can choose from a single joystick and 4 control button experience or go with a two joystick experience as an alternative. There’s even a classic D-Pad design lined up as a stretch goal.
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Apollo Arduino Training Board Created By Ascension Engineering (video) - Geeky Gadgets

Apollo Arduino Training Board Created By Ascension Engineering (video) - Geeky Gadgets | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Those of you that are interested in learning to program, may be interested in a new Arduino compatible training board which has been designed by Ascension Engineering, that has been specifically designed to make learning electronics easy and entertaining. The Apollo Arduino training board comprises of a number of components including three high quality single turn potentiometers, buttons, piezo speaker, light sensor, microSD card, pressure gauge and more. Watch the video below to learn more about the Apollo training board which allows you to learn more about the Arduino IDE and programming microcontrollers to aid in a number of different projects by reacting and displaying data from external sensors and interactions. Whether you are interested in learning to program or control lights in your house, the Apollo is a flexible and fun Arduino-compatible trainer board designed to make electronics easy and useful. We have completed a sample production run with our manufacturing partner. In order to bring the Apollo to market at an excellent price, we need to scale up our production, which requires additional funding. One of the other hurdles is to acquire FCC certification, since all products that include a microcontroller should receive a FCC unintentional radiator compliance certification. If our kickstarter is successful we expect to have the Apollo ready for shipment within 90 days. Simply put, the hardware. The Apollo features many hardware accessories in a clean compact layout with all the libraries and sample code ready to go. Our goal is to make it easy to get started with hardware integration by providing the Apollo in a ready to use state. If the Apollo Arduino training board is something you are interested in jump over to the Kickstarter crowdfunding website to make a pledge from just $65 for super early bird backers and help the Apollo make the jump into production. Source: Kickstarter Filed Under: Concepts & Design, Hardware, Top News Popular Geeky Gadgets Deals
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BBC rolls out Micro Bit computers to 1m UK students for free

BBC rolls out Micro Bit computers to 1m UK students for free | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
After months of delay, the BBC has launched its Micro Bit programmable computer, beginning with about a million of them being delivered for free to every child in year 7 (around 12 years old) across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Once they receive their own Micro Bits during this rollout, kids will be able to keep and use them throughout their remaining years at school. It’s part of the BBC’s program to encourage children to learn to code and creative with technology. Our best speaker lineup, ever. This year’s edition of TNW Conference in Amsterdam includes some of the biggest names in tech.Learn more The device will be available to buy from a range of retailers soon after today’s rollout; a price hasn’t been announced yet. The BBC wants to encourage kids to code with its free programmable computer The BBC will open-source the Micro Bit hardware and most of its software. It will also use the money earned from its commercial sales to further encourage as many people as possible to learn to code. To help kids pick up programming skills, the the Micro Bit comes equipped with 25 LEDs, configurable buttons, an accelerometer, compass, Bluetooth, and connections to hook it up to more sensors. It can also work with other similar devices, like Raspberry Pi, Arduino and Kano to build things like fitness trackers and smartwatches. Samsung developed an app that lets you use a smartphone or tablet to code on the Micro Bit. ➤ BBC Micro Bit Featured image credit: BBC
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Install Bluetooth for Raspberry Pi 3/Raspbian Jessie

To use the built-in Bluetooth of Raspberry Pi 3/Raspbian Jessie, we have to install some software:$ sudo apt-get install pi-bluetooth$ sudo apt-get install bluetooth bluez bluemanThen reboot.This video show how to send/receive file between raspberry Pi 3/Raspbian Jessie and PC running Windows 10.http://helloraspberrypi.blogspot.com/...
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Pair and send/receive file via Bluetooth between Raspberry Pi and Windows

This video show how to send/receive file between raspberry Pi 3/Raspbian Jessie and PC running Windows 10.http://helloraspberrypi.blogspot.com/...
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Desolder / Remove GPIO pins from a Raspberry Pi Zero

How not to remove a soldered GPIO pin header from a Raspberry Pi Zero :).
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Raspberry Pi PowerHAT - Powering Your Pi, Simplified

Raspberry Pi PowerHAT - Powering Your Pi, Simplified | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The Raspberry Pi single board computer is awesome at what it does, but it requires a lot of power to do so. I think we've all been there - the Raspberry Pi isn't exactly the easiest thing to supply power to, as it's power draw fluctuates a lot, which basically makes powering it on the go impossible. In addition, several cables are needed to power to the Raspberry Pi. making it very immobile. To solve this common problem with all Raspberry Pi's, I designed, prototyped, and engineered a mobile "Raspberry Pi Battery Pack", called the "Raspberry Pi PowerHAT"! It combines power management circuitry, a LiPo Battery charging circuit, and a Buck/Boost converter for external power supplies, such as a solar panel, to make an all-in-one Raspberry Pi PowerHAT. It has 5 different power input settings, while keeping a small form factor, to keep it portable, and can be powered with almost any power source, between 3 and 12 volts. Keep reading to learn how you can obtain a FREE PDF version of this Instructable, a special FREE Raspberry Pi Power Patch, and a FREE 3-Month Pro Membership!!! If you like (or hate) this Instructable, please vote for it in one or all of the selected contests!
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PiStorms Challenge

PiStorms Challenge | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
So, you like Raspberry Pi but would prefer to build with LEGO?  No problem!  You can use the Mindsensors PiStorms to add a touch screen, buttons and motor and sensor ports to your Pi.  The designs for the LEGO Technic compatible parts that come with this are completely open source and available for anyone to tweak as they see fit. For those of you with access to a 3D printer (or simply awesome 3D design skills), you can now enter a competition to design your own LEGO Technic compatible frame for the PiStorms. The way it works is as follows, simply fork the GitHub repo with an example frame and start hacking away at it!  So, what can you win?  Why, a PiStorms, of course!  Mindsensors will ship it to anywhere in the world.  The competition ends 15 May 2016. Find out more about this competition by checking out the main page: [LINK].
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Touch sensing | Arduino UNO | Processing 3 | Basic Electronics

Sensing the touch, Amplification, Fintering, Serial port, Drawing
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How to get started with the new BBC micro:bit computer - Pocket-lint

How to get started with the new BBC micro:bit computer - Pocket-lint | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Announced last year, the BBC micro:bit pocket-sized computer is now being delivered to all 11 and 12-year-olds (Year 7) in the UK. The new computer, which many will see as an alternative to the Raspberry Pi, offers kids the chance to play with dedicated hardware and learn coding at home and in the classroom. Teachers have already had a couple of months to play with the kit, but to many school children it will be the first time they've got their hands on one. But where should they start? What resources are available? And, as a parent whose child could be about to bring one home, what can you do to get involved? A number of teachers who have been exploring the BBC micro:bit over the last few months have put together the following top tips to help others get the most out of the device: BBC micro:bit hardware: Understand what you've got The computer board, which enables you to see all the elements exposed, features a processor, compass, accelerometer, USB power port, a Bluetooth antenna and battery port to connect two AAA batteries. Kids can also use the five input and output (I/O) rings to connect up to five crocodile clips via the board to hook it up to other devices. Before you get confused with all the coding elements though, just take some time to have a play with the hardware of the micro:bit. Try getting the lights to light up depending on what you do or how you move the board. BBC micro:bit teachers guide: Use the "Quick Start Guide for Teachers" to get started "Start by working through activities in the Quick Start Guide for Teachers," says Steve Richards, ICT teacher and curriculum team leader at Eastlea Community School. "It's a really great hands-on introduction to the BBC micro:bit." The 32-page guide not only explains in detail what the micro:bit can do, but also gives you a number of tutorials to get you started. And just because it's aimed at teachers and pupils in class shouldn't put you off, the tutorials are just as easy to understand at home as they are in the classroom. Check out the micro:bit website. The Teachers Guide only features three tutorials to get you started but there are plenty of other things you can do with the small computer. The BBC has created a dedicated micro:bit website with stacks of information videos, tutorials, and more to try out.  BBC micro:bit code editors: Get coding with your preferred editor "Kick off with the Block Editor. It’s a great graphical coding environment to use as you introduce students to the BBC micro:bit, before you start using the text-based programming language" says Jane Waite, Computing at School London regional coordinator (CAS London). Nic Hughes, head of computing at Latymer Prep School adds, "There are some really effective lesson plans for the Touch Develop code editor, targeted at all skill levels." There are different coding editors to try: Code Kingdoms JavaScript, Microsoft Block Editor, Microsoft Touch Developer, and Python. You can use the one that will suit different tasks or your ability. The best option is to probably just play around with what feels better for you. Touch Develop is probably best suited for use with a tablet or smartphone, while Python is really aimed at more advanced programmers. BBC micro:bit additional projects: Look at the bigger picture "Look for ways to incorporate the BBC micro:bit into a wider project," says Steve Richards, ICT teacher and curriculum team leader at Eastlea Community School. "Some of our kids used them as a brain for a self-driving car, a controller for a robotic arm and as part of a fitness strap."
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Domotic easy made with raspberry pi

I made a device that make possible control from smartphones or tablets many devices such radio, coffee maker , ligths, etc.
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Raspberry Pi 3 vs BBC Micro Bit: How do the DIY computers compare?

Raspberry Pi 3 vs BBC Micro Bit: How do the DIY computers compare? | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Raspberry Pi or BBC Micro Bit? We see how the microcomputers match up After months of setbacks, the BBC has finally started delivering its free microcomputer to one million UK school children. But how does the BBC Micro Bit compare to the Raspberry Pi 3? Originally planned to begin in October 2015, the BBC's scheme will see every child in year 7 in the UK get their own BBC Micro Bit to help teach them the basics of computing. The project is evidently inspired by the BBC Micro, which did a similar thing for kids in the 1980s. But what exactly can be done with the BBC Micro Bit? And more importantly, how does it stack up to the current microcomputer king, the Raspberry Pi 3? We know that the Micro Bit is an extremely simple, low-grade device aimed at very basic, entry-level use cases. Let's take a closer look at the differences between these two microcomputers. RASPBERRY PI 3 VS BBC MICRO BIT - DESIGN Let's get this right out of the way: the BBC Micro Bit and the Raspberry Pi 3 are completely different devices. In fact, rather than rivalling it, the BBC Micro Bit is intended as a gateway to the likes of the Raspberry Pi 3. To that end, while the Raspberry Pi 3 resembles a rudimentary PC - a board with multiple recognisable connections - the BBC Micro Bit is essentially a 5 x 4cm circuit board with five basic I/O rings for hooking up other devices and even power. Related: What is Raspberry Pi Zero? It also has many of its functions attached directly, such as 25 red LEDs that can be programmed to light up, and two programmable control buttons. It's operating at a much more basic level than the Raspberry Pi 3, and is designed to interact with other devices rather than acting as a stand-alone system. RASPBERRY PI 3 VS BBC MICRO BIT - POWER Raspberry Pi 3: 1.2GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU and Broadcom Videocore IV GPU, 1GB RAM BBC Micro Bit: 32-bit ARM Cortex M0 CPU, 16KB RAM We don't know about the BBC Micro Bit's specs, but we do know that it runs on an ARM Cortex MO CPU chip, which is the smallest ARM processor available. It's designed to be extremely small and energy efficient, as well as easy to program for. Related: Raspberry Pi 3 vs Raspberry Pi 2 "With just 56 instructions, it is possible to master quickly the entire Cortex-M0 instruction and its C friendly architecture, making development simple and fast," says ARM. More importantly, in terms of this piece, the Micro Bit's chip is significantly less powerful than the Raspberry Pi 3's ARM Cortex-A53 CPU, which is the kind of chip you'd expect to find in entry-level to mid-range smartphones. RASPBERRY PI 3 VS BBC MICRO BIT - CONNECTIVITY Raspberry Pi 3: 4 x USB 2.0, 1 x HDMI, Ethernet, 3.5mm audio jack, 40 GPIO pins, Camera interface, Display interface, MicroSD card slot, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth BBC Micro Bit: 5 x I/O rings, Bluetooth Low Energy, Micro-USB controller, edge connector, compass, accelerometer There's a large difference in connectivity here, as we've already touched upon. Once again, the Raspberry Pi 3, despite being very basic, actually has the recognisable connections of a modern computer. It has an HDMI slot, four USB 2.0 slots, an ethernet port, and a 3.5mm audio jack. It also has Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, something which its predecessor, the Raspberry Pi 2, missed out on. That makes it great for using as a media centre. The BBC Micro Bit has a basic set of five I/O rings, meaning you'll need crocodile clips to physically hook it up to other devices (such as sensors or robots). Related: 6 of the coolest Raspberry Pi projects However, it does feature Bluetooth, so you'll be able to hook up to phones and other devices wirelessly. There's also an accelerometer and a compass, so the BBC Micro Bit can be used for the kind of directional applications or motion-based games you might find on a smartphone (albeit a lot more basic). Interestingly, one whole side of the BBC Micro Bit is a standard edge connector, which means it can be physically plugged into other devices like the Raspberry Pi 3 itself. The Raspberry Pi will then power it, otherwise two AAA batteries will do the trick. RASPBERRY PI 3 VS BBC MICRO BIT - SOFTWARE Raspberry Pi 3: Variety of Debian-based OSs, primarily Raspbian OS, free Windows 10 version BBC Micro Bit: Embedded software platform, web-based interface Raspberry Pi 3 is a full applications processor-based device that runs Linux and Windows 10, while the BBC Micro is an embedded software platform that doesn’t run a full operating system. The Pi even features a web-based UI for editing in JavaScript, Python, C++ and Blocks. Related: Raspberry Pi 2 vs Raspberry Pi The difference is night and day, and really drives home how entry-level the BBC Micro Bit is. It's meant to teach kids the very building blocks of computing, while Raspberry Pi 3's software showcases a more recognisably modern OS. RASPBERRY PI 3 VS BBC MICRO BIT - PRICE Raspberry Pi 3: £30 BBC Micro Bit: Free to year 7 students The Raspberry Pi 3 comes at a stupendously low price of £30, but that's still much more expensive than free, which is what the BBC Micro Bit is for year 7 kids. Of course, most people aren't year 7 kids, and the BBC has confirmed that it will make the Micro Bit available to purchase. Originally the Micro Bit was going to be made available to buy by 'the end of 2015'. Of course, with the delays in getting the product into schools, it remains unclear when the device will be available to buy. There's also no news on a price as yet, but we'd be very surprised if it cost anywhere near as much as the Raspberry Pi 3. EARLY VERDICT As you can see, there really is no comparison between these two devices. If the Raspberry Pi 3 is a 'my first proper computer,' then the BBC Micro Bit teaches the raw building blocks of coding at the heart of it. It's even more fundamental. The Raspberry Pi 3 is a much more advanced and practically useful device, but if you or your kid is starting at the very beginning of your programming journey, the BBC Micro Bit looks hard to beat.
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Arduino Nano Runs Battery Spot Welder

Arduino Nano Runs Battery Spot Welder | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Soldering might look like a tempting and cheap alternative when building or repairing a battery pack, but the heat of the iron could damage the cell, and the resulting connection won’t be as good as a weld. Fortunately, though, a decent spot welder isn’t that tough to build, as [KaeptnBalu] shows us with his Arduino-controlled battery spot welder. When it comes to delivering the high currents necessary for spot welding, the Arduino Nano is not necessarily the first thing that comes to mind. But the need for a precisely controlled welding pulse makes the microcontroller a natural for this build, as long as the current handling is outsourced. In [KaeptnBalu]’s build, he lets an array of beefy MOSFETs on a separate PCB handle the welding current. The high-current wiring is particularly interesting – heavy gauge stranded wire is split in half, formed into a U, tinned, and each leg gets soldered to the MOSFET board. Welding tips are simply solid copper wire, and the whole thing is powered by a car battery, or maybe two if the job needs extra amps. The video below shows the high-quality welds the rig can produce. Spot welders are a favorite on Hackaday, and we’ve seen both simple and complicated builds. This build hits the sweet spot of complexity and functionality, and having one on hand would open up a lot of battery-hacking possibilities. Thanks [Chris Muncy] for the tip.
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PurpleKit Home Robot Construction Kit (video) - Geeky Gadgets

PurpleKit Home Robot Construction Kit (video) - Geeky Gadgets | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Francisco Juretig based in London UK has created a new kit which has been specifically designed to help construct and build home robots and includes all the hardware needed to create a number of different systems and projects depending on what you can think up. The PurpleKit home robot construction kit has been launched on the Kickstarter website with the aim of raising £6,000 to make the jump into production, check out the video below to learn more about what’s included. Juretig explains more about the inspiration for the robot construction kit and what can be created. Once you start discovering the beautiful world of robotics, you will realize that are are plenty of excellent electronic options available. You will probably find proper tools, tons of Arduino/Raspberry modules, and several other excellent electronic kits. The problem appears when you actually want to create “real” things that interact with those electronics. For the beginner, it’s easy to get lost into the thousands of mechanical pieces, servos, motors, aluminium parts and beams available. It’s likely that you will spend a lot of money buying some pieces that are not the proper ones, or that cannot be joined together; and eventually spending a lot of time across the several DIY websites to understand what’s available and what you could do with those pieces. This kit bridges the gap between DIY electronics and mechanics. For example, assume you want to create a robotic arm with your specific customization, or you want to create a fan that swings according to some instructions, or a linear rail to place a camera, or a large enclosure for your Arduino projects. Instead of scavenging through internet, it would be easier to get a kit containing all the stuff that your need. For more information on the new PurpleKit robotics kit jump over to the Kickstarter website for details and to make a pledge via the link below. Source: Kickstarter Filed Under: Gadgets News, Top News Popular Geeky Gadgets Deals
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Raspberry Pi Laptop Pi Top Kit Soon Arriving At Adafruit For $275 - Geeky Gadgets

Raspberry Pi Laptop Pi Top Kit Soon Arriving At Adafruit For $275 - Geeky Gadgets | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
If you have been considering purchasing the new Pi Top Raspberry Pi laptop kit that transforms your Pi mini PC into a fully fledge laptop, you might be interested to know that the kit will soon be available priced at $275 from Adafruit. The open source laptop allows you to build your very own Pi laptop and the kit supports the new Raspberry Pi 3 mini PC which launched just last month providing a considerable boost in performance when compared to older mini PCs in the Pi range. Included in the Pi Top Raspberry Pi laptop kit is the following, although the Raspberry Pi mini PC is not included – Screen – Connect the screen by simply slotting the metal hinge into the base bottom piece. A single cable is plugged into the Pi-Top Hub and away you go! – Base Top – Attach and remove the base top piece by sliding it over the base bottom and pressing down. You will hear a satisfying ‘click’ when you have popped it into place. – Base Bottom – The base bottom contains the battery and modular rail where you will pop in the Hub and Raspberry Pi 2. No wires or tools are required, like a lego laptop you snap everything into place. The Pi-Top smart battery pack is protected by a sheet of brushed stainless steel, so you can be sure your battery is securely in place. – Hub – With over 150 components on this circuit board, the Pi-Top Hub PCB takes care of power management, our screen driver and a host of other functionality which allows us to turn the Raspberry Pi into a great open source laptop. 1x 8GB SD Card with Pi-Top OS For more information on the new Pi Top kit available from the Adafruit store jump over to the  official Adafruit website for details. Source: Adafruit Filed Under: Hardware, Laptops, Top News Popular Geeky Gadgets Deals
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