Raspberry Pi
825.5K views | +56 today
Raspberry Pi
A complete ARM GNU/Linux computer for $25.
(also covering Arduino and BeagleBone)
Curated by F. Thunus
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Rockchip RK3229 based MXQ 4K System Info and Antutu Benchmark

Rockchip RK3229 based MXQ 4K System Info and Antutu Benchmark | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Since MXQ-4K TV box is not working well enough, even after a firmware update, I’ve decided not to stop a full review. But since this is the first Rockchip RK3229 device I’ve received, I’ll still share some system information (CPU-Z) and Antutu benchmark results. Rorkchip RK3229 is detected as a quad core Cortex A7 processor between 408 MHz and 1.46 GHz with a Mali-400MP GPU. CPU-Z does not know about it, so it only detect RK3066, meaning the manufacturing process (40 nm) is wrongly reported, and RK3229 is manufactured using a 28nm process. The model us MXQ-4K (rk322x) with the board simply called rk30sdk. They’ve also set the framebuffer resolution to 1280×720 probably due to the limited performance of Mali-400MP GPU. Internal storage is shown to be 3.81GB large, but that’s because I modified the firmware, and it’s now 1.44GB with the latest firmware. Rockchip RK3229 does not support Android 5.x, so all boxes are shipped with Android 4.4.4 running on top of Linux 3.10.0. Based on Build ID, Shenzhen Hotack Technology is likely to be the manufacturer, or at least the company that works on firmware and hardware part. Then I’ve run Antutu 6.04 in the morning right after booting the device, and in the evening after leaving it running idled most of the day. Antutu “morning” results reports a score with 19,912 points, and quite close to the score reported on GeekBuying (21,000 points). However, the “evening” benchmark shows a different story with only 12,849 points. Actually, I got this score most of the time, so the device must have some serious issues with regards to cooling, although it might be tougher than usual conditions in my location, since it’s summer here, and my office temperature is around 30 C (with aircon) most of the day, and around 25C at 9am. If we look at the score details, 3D graphics results are the same, but UX, CPU and RAM results are all impacted in the second test. It’s quite possible fixing the throttling issue would also improve video playback, so other Rockchip RK3229 TV box could perform better, and even MXQ-4K might be fixable with some hardware hacking with a larger heatsink or/or fan.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Create a speedometer for your skateboard with Arduino

Create a speedometer for your skateboard with Arduino | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Create a speedometer for your skateboard with Arduino This speedometer communicates with an Android-based app over Bluetooth.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Embed with Elliot: ARM Makefile Madness

Embed with Elliot: ARM Makefile Madness | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
To wrap up my quick tour through the wonderland of make and makefiles, we’re going to look at a pair of possible makefiles for building ARM projects. Although I’m specifically targeting the STM32F407, the chip on a dev board that I have on my desk, it’s reasonably straightforward to extend these to any of the ST ARM chips, and only a bit more work to extend it to any ARM processor. If you followed along in the first two installments of this series, I demonstrated some basic usages of make that heavily leveraged the built-in rules. Then, we extended these rules to cross-compile for the AVR series of microcontrollers. Now we’re going to tackle a more complicated chip, and that’s going to mean compiling with support libraries. While not required, it’s a lot easier to get an LED blinking on the ARM platforms with some additional help. One of the main contributions of an IDE like Arduino or mbed or similar is the ease of including external libraries through pull-down menus. If you’ve never built a makefile-based project before, you might be surprised how it’s not particularly more difficult to add libraries to your project. ARM MAKEFILE TAKE ONE: EXPLICIT VERSION To start off, our ARM makefile is a lot like our AVR version. We need to specify the cross-compilation tools so that the computer doesn’t build files in its native format, and pass some compilation and linker flags using the CFLAGS and LFLAGS implicit variables, respectively. ## Cross-compilation commands CC = arm-none-eabi-gcc AR = arm-none-eabi-ar OBJCOPY = arm-none-eabi-objcopy SIZE = arm-none-eabi-size ... ## Platform and optimization options CFLAGS = -c -fno-common -Os -g -mcpu=cortex-m4 -mthumb CFLAGS += -Wall -ffunction-sections -fdata-sections -fno-builtin CFLAGS += -Wno-unused-function -ffreestanding LFLAGS = -Tstm32f4.ld -nostartfiles -Wl,--gc-sections A number of these options are shared with the AVR makefile from last time — splitting the functions out into their own sections and garbage-collecting the unused ones, for instance. ARM-specific entries include the processor and the “thumb” instruction set options. Finally, in the linker flags, LFLAGS, we pass a memory map (stm32f4.ld) to the linker that tells it where everything needs to go in memory. We didn’t need this file in the AVR case because the chip has a simple and consistent memory layout that GCC can just fill in for us. Not so in the ARM world, but you can find the right memory map for your project in the development libraries that you’re using. Rules The rules to build the project aren’t particularly complicated. Because make rules are specified in terms of targets and their dependencies, it’s often easiest to think backwards through a rule chain. In this case, my ARM flash programmer needs a raw binary image file to send to the chip, so we can start there. The object-copy command makes a binary out of an .elf file, the linker makes an .elf file from compiled objects, and a default rule compiles our source code into objects. ## Rules all: main.bin size flash %.bin: %.elf $(OBJCOPY) --strip-unneeded -O binary $< $@ main.elf: $(OBJS) stm32f4.ld $(LD) $(LFLAGS) -o main.elf $(OBJS) That wasn’t hard, was it? The first rule defined is always the default that gets run when you just type make, so I tend to make it a good one. In this case, it compiles the needed binary file, prints out its size, and flashes it into the chip all in one fell swoop. It’s like the “do-everything” button in any IDE, only I don’t have to move my hand over to the mouse and click. (Remember that $< is makefile-speak for the dependency — the .elf file — and $@ is the variable that contains the target .bin.) Libraries: Headers Which brings us to libraries. The rule for making main.elf above relies on a variable OBJS (objects) that we haven’t defined yet, and that’s where we get to include other people’s code (OPC). (Yeah, you know me.) In C, including other modules is simply a matter of compiling both your code and the OPC into object files, including a header file to tell the compiler which functions come from which files, and linking the objects together. In our case, we’ll be linking against both the CMSIS standard ARM library and ST’s HAL driver library for the F4 processor. Since I’ve done a bit of STM32F4 programming, I like to keep these libraries someplace central rather than re-duplicating them for each sub-project, and that means that I have to tell make where to find both the header files to include, and the raw C source files that provide the functions. The header files are easy, so let’s tackle them first. You simply pass the -I[your/directory/here] option to the compiler and it knows to go looking there for the .h files. (Make sure you also include the current directory!) ## Library headers CFLAGS += -I./ CFLAGS += -I/usr/local/lib/CMSIS/Device/ST/STM32F4xx/Include/ CFLAGS += -I/usr/local/lib/CMSIS/Include/ CFLAGS += -I/usr/local/lib/STM32F4xx_HAL_Driver/Inc/ In this case, we’re including both the overall CMSIS headers that are shared across all ARM platforms, as well as the specific ones for my chip. Libraries: Objects Once the compiler knows where to find the header files, we need to compile the actual C code in the add-on libraries. We do this, as before, by telling make that we want the object files that correspond to the C code in question. We specify the target, and make tries to satisfy the dependencies. # our code OBJS = main.o # startup files and anything else OBJS += handlers.o startup.o ## Library objects OBJS += /usr/local/lib/STM32F4xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f4xx_hal_rcc.o OBJS += /usr/local/lib/STM32F4xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f4xx_hal_gpio.o OBJS += /usr/local/lib/STM32F4xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f4xx_hal.o OBJS += /usr/local/lib/STM32F4xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f4xx_hal_cortex.o OBJS += /usr/local/lib/CMSIS/Device/ST/STM32F4xx/Source/Templates/system_stm32f4xx.o Remember from the first makefile example that make knows how to compile .c code into .o object files. So by setting the variable OBJ as a dependency of some other target, each of the source files that correspond to the listed objects will get automagically compiled. And since we already have a rule that links all of the object files into a single main.elf file, we’re done! ## Rules main.elf: $(OBJS) stm32f4.ld $(LD) $(LFLAGS) -o main.elf $(OBJS) Details The rest of the makefile is convenience rules for flashing the chip and etcetera. Look through if you’d like and here’s a helpful tip on how to do that: If you want to see what make is thinking just type make -p which lists all of the rules and some variables, taking the current makefile into account. make --warn-undefined-variables can also help catch typos — if you type OBJ instead of OBJS. FANCIER ARM MAKEFILE: BUILDING UP THE CORE LIBRARY The make system gives you so many cool tools to automate things, it’s really hard to know when to stop. Quite honestly, I probably should stick to a simple makefile with few moving parts like the one above. It’s very nice to have an explicit list of all of the bits of included library code in one place in the makefile. If you want to know what extra stuff is needed to compile and run the program, all you need to look at is the OBJS definitions. But there are a few make tricks that maybe will come in handy later on in your life, and I can’t resist, so here goes. The above procedure also has one real flaw. It compiles the object files into the same directory as the library source. When you end up (re-)using the code in the CMSIS directory across projects with different processors, for instance, you’ll have object files compiled for one chip being linked in with another unless you’re careful to remove them all first. Archives It would be better to compile the object files locally, leaving you many object files floating around in your code directory. OCD programmers of yore hated that kind of clutter, and thus the archive file was born. An archive is just a bunch of object files jammed into one. To build one you pass the object files to an archiver, and out comes a .a file that you can link against later, and the end result is just the same as if you’d linked against all of the component object files, with much less typing. So let’s take the CMSIS and HAL libraries, all of them, compile them and wrap them up in one big archive called core.a. That way, we’ll only ever have to compile those objects once, until we download new versions of the libraries, and we’ll be free to use any additional parts of the library almost without thinking. (Note that this goes against my advice to be specific about which bits of code we’re including. But it’s so convenient.) Wildcards To build the core.a archive, we’ll need an object file for every source file in a few different directories. We could list them out, but there’s a better way. The solution is to use a wildcard to match every .c filename and then edit the names of each file to change the .c to a .o, giving us the complete list of objects. Here’s a simple snippet that compiles every .c file in the current directory by defining the corresponding object files as dependencies for an executable main program. This makes for a quick and dirty makefile to have on hand because it usually does what you want if you just plunk it down in a directory full of code. SRCS = $(wildcard *.c) OBJS = $(SRCS:.c=.o) CFLAGS = -Wall -I./ main: $(OBJS) $(LD) $(LFLAGS) -o main $(OBJS) So we can get our list of object files by wildcarding the various CMSIS and ST library directories: ## Locate the main libraries CMSIS = /usr/local/lib/CMSIS HAL = /usr/local/lib/STM32F4xx_HAL_Driver HAL_SRC = $(HAL)/Src CMSIS_SRC = $(CMSIS)/Device/ST/STM32F4xx/Source/Templates CORE_OBJ_SRC = $(wildcard $(HAL_SRC)/*.c) CORE_OBJ_SRC += $(wildcard $(CMSIS_SRC)/*.c) CORE_LIB_OBJS = $(CORE_OBJ_SRC:.c=.o) CORE_LOCAL_LIB_OBJS = $(notdir $(CORE_LIB_OBJS)) This creates a list of object files for every source file, and it does one other cute trick. The notdir command removes the leading directory information from every file in the list. So if we had a long filename like /usr/local/lib/STM32F4xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f4xx_hal_rcc.o we now just have stm32f4xx_hal_rcc.o. We’re going to need this because we want to assemble all of the object files together in the current directory, so we have to specify the object files without their full path. VPATH We’ve got an object file for each source file in the various libraries, but we still need a rule to make them. If all of the C code were in the current directory, we’d be set, because when make sees stm32f4xx_hal_rcc.o, it tries to build it out of stm32f4xx_hal_rcc.c. Sadly, stm32f4xx_hal_rcc.c lives in /usr/local/lib/STM32F4xx_HAL_Driver/Src/. If only there were a way to tell make to go looking for C code in different directories, just like we told the compiler to go looking for header files in different include directories. Enter the VPATH. VPATH = $(HAL_SRC):$(CMSIS_SRC) Long story short, a colon-separated list of directories passed to the special VPATH variable treats OPC, located anywhere on your disk, as if it were our own code in the current directory. So with our list of the localized version of all of the core object files, and the VPATH correctly set to point to the corresponding source code, we can compile all the object files and throw them all into a single archive file. core.a: $(CORE_OBJ_SRC) $(MAKE) $(CORE_LOCAL_LIB_OBJS) $(AR) rcs core.a $(CORE_LOCAL_LIB_OBJS) rm -f $(CORE_LOCAL_LIB_OBJS) The $(MAKE) automatic variable just calls make. Here, we’re effectively saying make stm32f4xx_hal_i2c_ex.o stm32f4xx_hal_dcmi.o stm32f4xx_hal_pcd.o ... for all of the object files. The AR line creates our archive (core.a). Then, we clean up all the extraneous object files that are now included in core.a. Neat and tidy. Wizardry: Putting it all Together A recap: We use a wildcard to identify all of the source and get the corresponding object filenames. VPATH points at the source files in the foreign library, so make can find the remote source. We then make each of the object files and throw them all together into an archive, and then clean up afterwards. Now we’re ready to compile our personal code against this gigantic library of functions. But don’t worry, because we passed the CFLAGS to remove unused code, we only end up with the bare minimum. And we never have to re-compile the library code again. In this version of the makefile, OBJS is just the three local object files. Everything else is in the core.a archive. main.elf: $(OBJS) core.a stm32f4.ld $(LD) $(LFLAGS) -o main.elf $(OBJS) core.a The core version of this makefile is also available in one piece for your perusal. I’ve also pushed up the entire project to GitHub so you can make it for an STM32F4 chip, or modify it to work with other platforms. If people are interested, I’ll do some more “getting started with ARM” type topics in the near future. We’ve barely scratched the surface of make, yet we’ve done a complex compilation that automatically pulls in external code libraries and pre-compiles them into a local archive. There’s no limit to the trouble you can get yourself into with make and once you start, you’ll never stop. Just try to remember to keep things simple if you can, and remember that debugging is twice as hard as writing code in the first place — you’ll want to make it easy on yourself.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Raspberry Pi Zero Interview - Mike Stimson

Since 2013 the Raspberry Pi products have been designed using Cadence PCB and schematic software. We caught up with Mike Stimson to have a quick chat about the idea behind the Pi Zero
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Raspberry Pi Irrigation Controller - detects leaks

We built an irrigation controller that detects and isolates faults such a leaks, blockages, and broken valves using a Raspberry Pi running Windows 10 IoT core passing messages to the Microsoft Azure cloud service. Farm and home owners can get a push notification when something breaks or leaks, and using evapotranspiration data from the water district, can optimize water use. Farm and home owners would no longer have to "walk the lines" (inspect the system when it is running) because problems are automatically detected and the user is immediately made aware of a problem. More details can be found here: https://www.hackster.io/isavewater/ra...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Raspberry Pi Rover

This was a simple weekend project based on the rover project done here: https://www.hackster.io/peejster/rove... I added a powered speaker head to have the rover make a lot of noise. I plan to teach high school students how to build this rover.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Raspberry Pi Zero Interview - Mike Stimson

Since 2013 the Raspberry Pi products have been designed using Cadence PCB and schematic software. We caught up with Mike Stimson to have a quick chat about the idea behind the Pi Zero
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Install Bluetooth for Raspberry Pi 3/Raspbian Jessie

To use the built-in Bluetooth of Raspberry Pi 3/Raspbian Jessie, we have to install some software:$ sudo apt-get install pi-bluetooth$ sudo apt-get install bluetooth bluez bluemanThen reboot.This video show how to send/receive file between raspberry Pi 3/Raspbian Jessie and PC running Windows 10.http://helloraspberrypi.blogspot.com/...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Pair and send/receive file via Bluetooth between Raspberry Pi and Windows

This video show how to send/receive file between raspberry Pi 3/Raspbian Jessie and PC running Windows 10.http://helloraspberrypi.blogspot.com/...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Desolder / Remove GPIO pins from a Raspberry Pi Zero

How not to remove a soldered GPIO pin header from a Raspberry Pi Zero :).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Raspberry Pi PowerHAT - Powering Your Pi, Simplified

Raspberry Pi PowerHAT - Powering Your Pi, Simplified | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The Raspberry Pi single board computer is awesome at what it does, but it requires a lot of power to do so. I think we've all been there - the Raspberry Pi isn't exactly the easiest thing to supply power to, as it's power draw fluctuates a lot, which basically makes powering it on the go impossible. In addition, several cables are needed to power to the Raspberry Pi. making it very immobile. To solve this common problem with all Raspberry Pi's, I designed, prototyped, and engineered a mobile "Raspberry Pi Battery Pack", called the "Raspberry Pi PowerHAT"! It combines power management circuitry, a LiPo Battery charging circuit, and a Buck/Boost converter for external power supplies, such as a solar panel, to make an all-in-one Raspberry Pi PowerHAT. It has 5 different power input settings, while keeping a small form factor, to keep it portable, and can be powered with almost any power source, between 3 and 12 volts. Keep reading to learn how you can obtain a FREE PDF version of this Instructable, a special FREE Raspberry Pi Power Patch, and a FREE 3-Month Pro Membership!!! If you like (or hate) this Instructable, please vote for it in one or all of the selected contests!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

PiStorms Challenge

PiStorms Challenge | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
So, you like Raspberry Pi but would prefer to build with LEGO?  No problem!  You can use the Mindsensors PiStorms to add a touch screen, buttons and motor and sensor ports to your Pi.  The designs for the LEGO Technic compatible parts that come with this are completely open source and available for anyone to tweak as they see fit. For those of you with access to a 3D printer (or simply awesome 3D design skills), you can now enter a competition to design your own LEGO Technic compatible frame for the PiStorms. The way it works is as follows, simply fork the GitHub repo with an example frame and start hacking away at it!  So, what can you win?  Why, a PiStorms, of course!  Mindsensors will ship it to anywhere in the world.  The competition ends 15 May 2016. Find out more about this competition by checking out the main page: [LINK].
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Say hello to my nano friend... #arduino #nano #arduinonano #microcontroller #diy #electronics #usb #irproject

Say hello to my nano friend... #arduino #nano #arduinonano #microcontroller #diy #electronics #usb #irproject | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Upload Sign In Sign Up Say hello to my nano friend... #arduino #nano #arduinonano #microcontroller #diy #electronics #usb #irproject Uploaded on March 22, 2016
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

BBC Micro Bit review

Designed by the BBC as part of its Make it Digital initiative, the micro:bit is one of the world's smallest programmable computers. What's more, it's free to all UK year 7 students and aims to inspire the next generation of engineers and coders. On first handling the micro:bit, it's instantly apparent that its target audience is different to that of the Arduino and Raspberry Pi. BBC's micro computer has simple contacts, built-in buttons, sensors and a set of LEDs that act as a display once powered up. The large connectors on the board are known as PINS. They supply a large contact surface so crocodile clips can be easily attached for external electronics, which is ideal for a classroom environment and quick prototyping. The PINS include three inputs, a 3V and GND, and between each are further contacts for more advanced projects. Once connected via USB to your computer, the board appears as a drive. Coding is handled through the microbit.co.uk website app, and this site can be used on and offline. At present the site offers several coding environments which are very much dependent on skill and include: JavaScript, Block Editor, Touch Develop and MicroPython. Coding options The Block Editor is designed for those new to programmable computers with the educational angle very apparent. Simple code blocks can be dragged and dropped from the selection of categories on the left and are clearly labeled and ready to go. Even those new to code should be able to create a program in just a few minutes that will interact with the board and illuminate LEDs. At present one of the only issues with the Block Editor is the inability to undo, which can be frustrating if you accidentally delete a block section. Completed programs can at any point be previewed before being compiled and downloaded. The downloaded file then needs to be manually copied from your computer to the micro:bit, as at present there is no automatic uploader. Once you're familiar with the basics the block code can be converted into lines of code ready for the Touch Develop environment. This is more akin to standard coding environments but still guides the coder. Easily connect external electronics Coding is at the heart of the micro:bit but the board really comes alive once inputs and outputs such as sensors and servos are attached. The micro:bit ships with a selection of crocodile clips which can be quickly clipped onto contacts and your choice of output. The control of any device attached can be interacted with through the code, and for simple inputs such as a switch or sensor there are plenty of drag-and-drop coding options available in the Block Editor. As you get more advanced, further electronic components such as potentiometers, servos, LEDs and speakers can all be attached and controlled. There are plenty of simple projects available online to show you exactly how each line of code relates to the operation and control of the hardware through the small micro:bit computer. Final verdict For its size, the micro:bit is an incredible educational tool that will let teachers, parents and students have fun with code to create games, wearable tech and other devices as yet to be imagined. Its small size and built-in sensors make it quick to code and entertaining to use, but it's really designed for education and is a springboard to bigger more complex platforms rather than a rival to the likes of Arduino and Raspberry Pi. This review of the BBC Micro Bit first appeared in Linux Format. Click here to subscribe.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Install Bluetooth for Raspberry Pi 3/Raspbian Jessie

To use the built-in Bluetooth of Raspberry Pi 3/Raspbian Jessie, we have to install some software:$ sudo apt-get install pi-bluetooth$ sudo apt-get install bluetooth bluez bluemanThen reboot.This video show how to send/receive file between raspberry Pi 3/Raspbian Jessie and PC running Windows 10.http://helloraspberrypi.blogspot.com/...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Raspberry Pi Rover

This was a simple weekend project based on the rover project done here: https://www.hackster.io/peejster/rove... I added a powered speaker head to have the rover make a lot of noise. I plan to teach high school students how to build this rover.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Spark example 001

Parallel processing example using Spark on a cluster of Parallella and Raspberry Pi 2 computers (with a total of 42 cores under Spark, but 112 under MPI, which can use the Epiphany chip.) Now to parallelize the AI algorithms I'm working on.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Download Raspberry Pi Projects for the Evil Genius PDF EPUB

Link: http://booksaa.com/0071821589You can find here:http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/00718...Follow Amazon: https://twitter.com/amazonAmazon Google+: https://plus.google.com/+amazon/Amazon on Tumblr: http://amazon.tumblr.com/Amazon Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amazon/Amazon on Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/amazon/
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

My First Project Using Raspberry Pi + Arduino and a LCD

My first project interfacing my Raspberry Pi with Arduino UNO via USB and controlling the RG160A from linux terminal on my phone.The circuit is same as shown on this tutorial https://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Li... After planning the circuit on the breadboard connect Arduino with your laptop and upload this https://gist.github.com/imrandomizer/... to the Arduino.Upload This to Raspberry Pi https://gist.github.com/imrandomizer/...Then connect your pi with the arduino via USB.And execute the com_arduino.py on the raspberry pi using SSH or any other means. You can SSH from a terminal on your phone also.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Collection with Raspberry Pi and USB barcode scanner

Collection with Raspberry Pi and USB barcode scanner
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

The BBC's new Micro:bit computer will 'inspire a generation to code' 

The BBC's new Micro:bit computer will 'inspire a generation to code'  | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The BBC has dispatched up to 1 million of the micro:bit, its credit card-sized computers, to all children in Year 7 across the UK. The micro:bit, which is the modern descendant of the 1980s mini-computer the BBC micro, is a small, low cost computer designed to teach children how to code. It is made up of processors and sensors - the raw materials of a computer -but can be programmed in a number of ways. The goal is to teach kids to program and create their own games on the tiny device. "We wanted to try to create something that would ultimately help tackle the skills gap in the UK when it comes to the tech sector," said Sinead Rocks, the head of the BBC micro:bit project. "Children have many devices. They’re used to using tablets and smartphones. We wanted to do something that transformed them from being passive users, to teach them something about what they use on a daily basis." Up to one million of the devices are being given for free to all year seven pupils across the UK, including those who are home schooled, at private schools, and at state schools. The micro:bit was supposed to be released back in September, but delayed five months due to hardware issues and problems with the power supply. However, the children will permanently own the computers, so the delay on the micro:bit's release doesn't affect the pupils' time with it, said Rocks. What can I do with my BBC micro:bit? The micro:bit is similar to the Raspberry Pi, but is designed to be an entry level product for children that don't have any previous experience, or even interest, in coding. "It creates that first step for children who may not have known that they had an interest in coding," said Rocks. It has 25 red LED lights, and children can code it so text or designs are projected onto the lights, displaying messages. It also has Bluetooth capability, edge connectors, an accelerometer, a built-in compass, and a magnetometer. The micro:bit can be programmed to become anything from a game to a smart watch or fitness tracker. It can be connected to other devices like a television, to sensors, and even computers, such as the Raspberry Pi and Arduino. Teachers, who received micro:bits ahead of the children and who have started experimenting with them, have created games, used the bluetooth function to control an MP3 player, and connected it to headphones, according to Rocks. One class sent a micro:bit into near space in a weather balloon, and another created a limbo pole using its motion sensor. It has also been used to measure the dampness of soil, and to create a selfie remote control. "We wanted to create something that would surprise us," said Rocks. "It's really been gratifying to see that happening so early on in the initiative in the variety of ways it's already being used." The BBC partnered with 31 companies on the Make It Digital project, including technology giants Samsung and Microsoft, are running workshops on how to use the device. Samsung has also released an app that lets owners code on the go. And the BBC will be holding a series of live lessons on its website about how to use the computer. How is it different from the BBC micro? The micro:bit takes inspiration from the BBC micro of the 1980s. "Our ultimate ambition was to create something that had the same sense of energy and ambition that the micro did in the 80s," said Rocks. The micro:bit is smaller, faster, lighter and more adaptable than the micro was. "It's a replacement fit for this new tech era that we're in." The BBC micro came out when computing was a fairly new concept, and was designed to teach the UK what computers could be used to achieve. Now, the power of computers is ubiquitous, but most people don't understand how to control them, how the back end works. This is where the micro:bit comes in. "The BBC micro:bit has the potential to be a seminal piece of British innovation" Tony Hall, Director-General, BBC "The BBC micro started me on my journey towards a career in technology and the BBC micro:bit can have the same effect on children receiving their devices from today," said Simon Segars, chief executive of ARM, the Cambridge-based company who's hardware and software development kits were used to create the micro:bit. "The ability to code is now as important as grammar and mathematics skills and it can unlock important new career options. I can easily imagine a new wave of design entrepreneurs looking back and citing today as the day their passion for technology began." The hardware and much of the software behind the micro:bit will soon be made open source, and the devices will also go on sale to the general public. "The BBC micro:bit has the potential to be a seminal piece of British innovation, helping this generation to be the coders, programmers and digital pioneers of the future," said Tony Hall, the director general of the BBC. 10 things you can build using a Raspberry Pi For a round-up of technology news and analysis, sign up to our weekly Tech Briefing here.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Max2Play - Next Level Raspberry Pi OS

This video shows you exactly why Max2Play is a great control solution for your new Raspberry Pi! If you always wanted to use a Pi for your media center or hifi system, then look no further. Its functionality can easily be extended through plugins, provided both by our us and our great community. Why would you want over-night sessions and complicated programming in the console, when there is already Max2Play doing the work for you?NEW! Now supporting Raspberry Pi 3, Raspberry Pi Zero and bluetooth devices.What is Max2Play?The community project Max2Play offers an easy-to-use browser interface and control center that assists users with little or even no Linux knowledge. Max2Play is based on Raspian and serves as a multifunctional and flexible configuration tool for several use cases.Focusing on audio solutions, it offers a simple installation process for various AMPs and DACs for Raspberry Pi (e.g. HiFiBerry DAC+, HiFiBerry Digi+ or IQaudIO Pi-AMP+), a fast configuration of multiroom audio with a Squeezebox server, touchscreen control via Jivelite and much more.You would like to learn more about Max2Play? Please visit our website:http://www.max2play.com/en/All Max2Play Images and Plugins are available here:http://www.max2play.com/en/max2play-i...http://www.max2play.com/en/addons/If you have any questions, need help or have ideas, become part of our Max2Play Community and share your thoughts in our forums:http://www.max2play.com/en/forums/Visit our Facebook Page and Blog to learn about new features we add to Max2Play:https://www.facebook.com/Max2Play-817....http://www.max2play.com/en/category/g...Our latest Max2Play project is a Raspberry Pi assembly kit with High-End Sound and 7 Inch Touch Display. Have a look at our Instructable here:http://www.instructables.com/id/High-...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

$50 Raspberry Pi AIS-Receiver - How to

This might not be the most in depth guide but hopefully it will point you in the right direction of how to build yourself a cheap AIS-receiver from a Raspberry Pi and a DVB-T dongle for less than $50.Follow the steps in the guide and you'll have a working AIS-receiver.First of all, and MOST IMPORTANTLY make sure to buy a dongle with a compatible chip! 1. Check out the following link to see which chips that works:http://sdr.osmocom.org/trac/wiki/rtl-sdr2. Download rtl_ais from github:https://github.com/dgiardini/rtl-aisFollow the instructions, and make sure to calibrate the PPM to offset the internal error of your dongle. You can use rtl_fm from this page and then use rtl_test:http://sdr.osmocom.org/trac/wiki/rtl-... or Kalibrate https://github.com/steve-m/kalibrate-rtl3. Download kplexhttp://www.stripydog.com/kplex/4 Set it all up according to the video and you should be fine.You can download OpenCPN for free from the following link:http://opencpn.org/ocpn/
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by F. Thunus
Scoop.it!

Monitor Data From Anywhere With Arduino & the Adafruit FONA - Open Home Automation

In some situations, you could want to monitor a project remotely, and we all know that’s quite easy to do using an Arduino board & an Internet connection. However, a WiFi or Ethernet connection is not always available, for example in a secondary home in the countryside, or a mountain cabin. This is where this project comes into play: in this article, you are going to learn how to send measurement data via GPRS (cellular data), using the Adafruit FONA shield & Arduino. This way, you’ll be able to monitor projects remotely even if no Internet connection is available. Let’s start! Hardware & Software Requirements We are first going to see what components are required for this project. Of course, you’ll need an Arduino board. I used an Arduino Uno board here. The most important component of this project is of course the GSM/GPS shield. I used an Adafruit FONA 808 breakout board for this project: This is a very convenient piece of hardware as it integrates everything you need for your projects: a GSM/GPRS chip, as well as a GPS receiver. Note that in some countries, the plan is to stop the GPRS/GSM network in the future. In that case, you could perfectly use the 3G version of this board, which would work just as well for this project. Then, you’ll need a SIM card, in the ‘classic’ SIM card format. If you only have a micro or nano SIM card, you’ll need to use an adapter. Also, make sure that the SIM card is activated with at least some data available. For this project, I used a very cheap prepaid SIM card with about 10 MB of credit available on the card. You will also need a GSM/GPRS antenna, and a GPS antenna, that you can also get from Adafruit. I also used a simple DHT11 sensor for this project. As the shield is taking a lot of power, it needs an external battery to function properly. For that, I used a standard 3.7V LiPo battery with a JST connector. Finally, you will a breadboard and some jumper wires to make the required connections. This is the list of all the components that I used for this project: Arduino Uno Adafruit Fona 808 breakout + GSM uFL antenna + GPS antenna DHT11 sensor GSM SIM card with GPRS data available 3.7V LiPo battery LiPo battery charger Breadboard Jumper wires On the software side, you will need to have the latest version of the Arduino IDE, which you can find at: https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/Software You will also need the latest version of the Adafruit FONA library, which you can get using the library manager inside the Arduino IDE. Hardware Configuration We are now going to assemble the hardware of this project. We’ll set up the breakout board, and then assemble it to the Arduino board. The first step is to open up the FONA board so you can insert the SIM card. Then, simply insert the SIM inside the board and close the tray again. After that, put the GPRS antenna and the GPS antenna on the board. We are now going to connect the FONA board to the Arduino board. First, place the FONA board on the breadboard. Then, connect the different pins of the FONA board as follows: Vio connects to 5V of the Arduino board GND connects to GND Key connects to GND as well RX connects to digital 2 of the Arduino board TX connects to digital 3 of the Arduino board RST connects to digital pin 4 of the Arduino board For the DHT11 sensor, connect the first pin of the sensor to VCC of the Arduino board, the second pin to pin 7 of the Arduino board, and finally the last pin of the sensor to GND. Once that’s done, this is how it should look like: Finally, before moving on to the next section, make sure to connect the battery to the FONA board. Logging Data Online We are now going to use the GPRS connection to log data online, using a service called Dweet.io. Then, we’ll even use a website to display this data graphically. Of course, this assumes that you have a mobile Internet access where the project will be located. But that’s perfect to monitor data in a location where there is mobile Internet, but where you don’t want to install a regular Internet access. As the code is quite complex, I’ll only highlight the most important parts, but you can of course find the complete code on the GitHub repository of the project. First, we need to define a ‘thing’ name on Dweet.io, which is a virtual object that will hold all the measurement data: String yourThing = "8g62og"; Then, we activate the GPRS module on the board: if (!fona.enableGPRS(false)) Serial.println(F("Failed to turn off")); delay(1000); if (!fona.enableGPRS(true)) Serial.println(F("Failed to turn on")); delay(1000); After that, in the loop() function of the sketch, we send the measured data to Dweet.io, by making a GET request to the server: uint16_t statuscode; int16_t length; String url = "http://dweet.io/dweet/for/"; url += yourThing; url += "?temperature="; url += String(temperature); url += "&humidity="; url += String(humidity); char buf[80]; url.toCharArray(buf, url.length()); Serial.print("Request: "); Serial.println(buf); We also read back the answer and display it inside the Serial monitor. We also wait for one minute before sending data again: if (!fona.HTTP_GET_start(buf, &statuscode, (uint16_t *)&length)) { Serial.println("Failed!"); } while (length > 0) { while (fona.available()) { char c = fona.read(); Serial.write(c); length--; } } fona.HTTP_GET_end(); // Wait delay(60 * 1000); It’s now time to test the project! Grab the code the GitHub repository of the project at: https://github.com/openhomeautomation/monitor-data-arduino-fona Make sure to change the name of the ‘thing’ inside the code. Then, upload the code to the board, and open the Serial monitor. You should see the following inside the Serial monitor: If you can see this ‘succeeded’ message, it means the data was correctly uploaded to the server. You can now check it by going to the following URL: https://dweet.io/get/latest/dweet/for/my-thing-name You will get the last measurement inside your web browser: This means that you are now able to log data from your project, without a WiFi or Ethernet connection! Monitor Data From Anywhere But you can do more than that: we are now going to see how to display this data graphically. To do so, we’ll use a platform called Freeboard.io. This platform allows you to create free online dashboards for your projects, and interfaces nicely with Dweet.io. First, create a free account at: http://freeboard.io/ Now, create a new dashboard, and create a new source inside this dashboard with the following parameters: Of course, you need to insert your own thing name here. After that, you should see the source inside your dashboard, and when it was last updated: Now, we’ll create a widget to display the temperature. Create a new Pane, and inside this a new Gauge widget with the following data: Now, create the same for the humidity data. This should be the final result: Congratulations, you can now log data using your FONA board, and also monitor this data graphically from anywhere in the world! You can of course now adapt this project and build your own monitoring projects with it. You can for example log the data coming from several different boards to Dweet.io, and monitor all the data within a single dashboard. With that, you can monitor data in several location that don’t have a WiFi or Ethernet access. If you want to learn more about building similar projects with Arduino & the FONA board, I recommend checking the book that I wrote on the topic: GSM & GPS Projects With Arduino.
more...
No comment yet.