Raspberry Pi
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Raspberry Pi
A complete ARM GNU/Linux computer for $25.
(also covering Arduino and BeagleBone)
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Swede builds steam-powered Raspberry Pi. Nowhere to plug in micro-USB, then?

Swede builds steam-powered Raspberry Pi. Nowhere to plug in micro-USB, then? | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Sir Clive Sinclair in tech tin-rattle triumph
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Raspberry Pi Gets USB Hard-Disk Drive

Raspberry Pi Gets USB Hard-Disk Drive | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Powered by: The Original Electronics Parts Search And Procurment Tool
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Hacking The Raspberry Pi WiFi Antenna For More dB

Hacking The Raspberry Pi WiFi Antenna For More dB | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
I’ve been testing out the Raspberry Pi 3, and one thing I have found is that the WiFi antenna that was added in this new model is not especially good: the Pi has trouble connecting to my WiFi network in places that other devices have no issues. That’s not surprising, because the antenna on the Pi 3 is tiny: mounted right next to the display connector, it is just a few millimeters wide. [Ward] at DorkbotPDX agrees, so he decided to look into adding a better antenna by adding an external connector. He tried two approaches: replacing the antenna with a tail connector, and adding a U.FL connector to the unused solder pads on the board. Both require some delicate soldering work, so they aren’t approached lightly. Replacing the antenna with an external connector produced a significant increase in signal output, which should equate with more range for the WiFi connection. It is also interesting to note that the Pi 3 has solder pads on the board to add an external antenna connector, but that they are not used. Plus, one of the solder pads is covered by solder mask. Using these is the second approach that [Ward] used, soldering on a U.FL connector and connecting that to a small rubber duckie antenna. Again, this proved more efficient, increasing the power output of the antenna significantly. NOTE: This hack definitely falls into “Don’t try this at home” territory. Messing with antennas voids the warranty and FCC certification for the Pi, and can cause all sorts of signal-related unpleasantness if you aren’t careful.
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How to configure Raspberry Pi as a microcontroller

How to configure Raspberry Pi as a microcontroller | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Happy Pi Day! Check out our Raspberry Pi Week 2016 series of projects for everyone from the amateur tinkerer to the Raspberry Pi aficinado.
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Braccio – DIY Tinkerkit Robotic arm Arduino controlled

Braccio – DIY Tinkerkit Robotic arm Arduino controlled | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Unlock the unlimited possibilities of robotics with Braccio! You can assemble your Braccio in a multitude of ways. Arduino controlled robotic arm, in a
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Digital Zoetrope Powered By Pi

Digital Zoetrope Powered By Pi | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it

A zoetrope is a charming piece of Victoriana, a device that gives the sensation of a moving image by exposing its successive frames through slits in a rotating drum. [Brian Corteil] however is not co...

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Part 2 - Arduino MKR1000 - Getting Started to Programming

This part 2 is focused to connecting MKR1000 to computer for the first time, and getting started to the programming. Some people experience an issue on getti...
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Goon Squad

Raspberry Pi student challenge entry Category: Artistic Team Name: Goon Squad Team Members: Devin Attig, Michael Gale, and Chase Glenn Grade: 12 High School:...
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Recalbox on Raspberry pi 3 - recalboxOS 4.0.0-beta2

See how recalbox runs on RaspberryPi 3. This video has been made for the release of recalboxOS-4.0.0-beta2, the first release that supports the new RPi3 ! Ga...
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Raspberry Pi 3: Review & Speed Tests

My Raspberry Pi 3 review, including comparative speed tests with a Raspberry Pi 2 -- booting into Raspbian, loading Libre Office Writer, and applying a compl...
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Simple Home Automation with the Energenie Pi-mote Control

This is the Energenie Pi-mote Control starter kit with 2 sockets.. it allows you to wirelessly control a power socket from a Raspberry Pi using a few lines o...
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S4A

S4A | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Technical details Supported boards S4A works with Arduino Diecimila, Duemilanove and Uno. Other boards haven’t been tested, but they may also work. Connectivity Components have to be connecte…
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5 Cool Things You Can Do With A Raspberry Pi | The Economic Voice

5 Cool Things You Can Do With A Raspberry Pi | The Economic Voice | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The Raspberry Pi was initially created by an English foundation to help schools teach students about basic computer science. Raspberry has captured the imagination of the computing world, with innovative approaches, not seen since the days of the 8-bit technology. Now they have made an impact on computing technology, to a point where the series is taken seriously by techno geeks worldwide. Learn the basics with Raspberry Pi Believe it or not, this simple piece of hardware is perfect to teach kids the basic art of programming. Scratch is the right program to use for this and there are many online tutorials to get you there. If you are looking to purchase, Makersify stock a range of competitively price raspberry pi's with startup kits and other add on components. Here are some cool things you can do with a Raspberry Pi. Make a case for your new Pi Well we don’t want hose valuable electronics damaged by the elements so construct a protective case before you do anything else!  A cut out box made from cardboard will do the trick, or there are many templates online, which can provide you with the perfect protection. TV gives you a portal to the Internet Once you have a case, let’s see what you can do with a Raspberry PC. Well to start with, you can interact with your TV to give you browser power. This will allow you to surf the net with the right graphic capability. Just select the right browser and away you go! Wireless extender This awesome piece of kit can be created using the following hardware, AUSB Wi-Fi dongle Micro SD card A Raspberry Pi With these three components you can extend the range of your wireless signal. Talking toy This cool idea came from the movie Toy Story 3, which uses a Fisher Price telephone. By adding a Raspberry Pi B+, you can hear the local weather forecast and add sound clips of your choice. A great idea for the young ones, you could even have it tell short bedtime stories to your children. A Picrowave oven Yes, that’s right. Take an old microwave oven, replace the innards and make your own Pi oven. By redesigning the key pad you can add features like voice control, also by adding a web-based interface, you can have remote access. Pi Phone By taking a Raspberry Pi and combining it with a GSM module, a battery and a TFT touch screen, you have a homegrown cell phone. This project is a little more ambitious but definitely doable. Innovative technology by Raspberry The latest craze in personal computing, Raspberry has evolved over several versions with variations in memory capacity and peripheral device support. Check out this link if you are looking for more information about this hardware. The latest versions are more powerful than the first generation chips, with faster clock speeds and improved RAM capacity. The list of simple projects is growing as more and more users are becoming creative with Raspberry technology. The Economic Voice is a Proud Supporter of the Shaftesbury Fringe Find us on the News360 app Sign up HERE for our FREE NEWSLETTER Buy Your GOLD here Comment Here! comments Tags: computer science, rasperry pi, technology This entry was posted on Friday, March 18th, 2016 at 4:21 pm and is filed under Science, Technology & Environment. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
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Battery Backup For The Raspberry Pi

Battery Backup For The Raspberry Pi | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
You can go to any dollar store, gas station, big box store, or your favorite Internet retailer and get a USB power bank. It’s a lithium battery mashed into a plastic enclosure with a USB port, probably poorly engineered, but it does serve as a great power supply for the Raspberry Pi. For the Raspberry Pi Zero contest we’re running over on hackaday.io, [Patrick] built a lithium phosphate battery pack that’s much better engineered and has some features a simple USB power bank will never have. [Patrick]’s Raspberry Pi UPS isn’t just a battery and charge controller attached to the power rails; this board has a microcontroller that has full control over when the Pi wakes up, when the Pi goes to sleep, and can put the Pi into a clean shutdown, even in headless mode. SD cards around the world rejoiced. The electronics for this project are just a low-power MSP430 microcontroller and a boost regulator. The battery pack/power manager attaches to the Pi through the first few GPIO pins on the Pi’s 40-pin header. That’s enough to tap into the 3.3 and 5V supplies, along with the serial console so power events can be scripted on the Pi. So far, [Patrick] has made a few time-lapse movies with his lithium battery backup, a Pi Model A+, and a Raspberry Pi camera. He managed to take 99 pictures over the course of about 24 hours, powered only by a single lithium-ion cell. You can check that video out below. The Raspberry Pi Zero contest is presented by Hackaday and Adafruit. Prizes include Raspberry Pi Zeros from Adafruit and gift cards to The Hackaday Store! See All the Entries || Enter Your Project Now!
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How to Build Your Own Virtual Reality Headset for Less Than $150

How to Build Your Own Virtual Reality Headset for Less Than $150 | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Have no fear, the VR revolution is coming… But, unfortunately, it seems that attached to this emerging technology is quite the price tag. There’s the Oculus Rift, leading the VR hype-pack with the pre-order price of $599, the Microsoft HoloLens at $3,000 (for the Development Edition), and heck, even Google recently announced the creation of an entire division dedicated to virtual reality computing. For those with an immense DIY spirit, however, there’s a much cheaper and more engaging way to get your hands on a VR headset: building it yourself. In an Instructables post by Turkish developer Ahmet Yildirim, Yildirim details the step-by-step process in order to construct an Oculus Rift-like VR device for a huge fraction of the cost. “As a maker, you’ve got two options to acquire a new gadget. You can just buy it, or you can build it from scratch,” Yildirim writes in his blog. “In this case; I already had some research done on stereoscopic displays after my first interest in buying a Rift. So I already knew about some DIY projects on the subject.” Yildirim’s open source project, which he calls OpenVR, was first created by the young developer back in 2014, and. since then, the Maker community has come to both applaud and improve upon the OpenVR build. The internal components of the OpenVR, such as the Arduino and LCD display, are encased in a 3D printed case, which Yildirim provides in the form of a number of .stl files. The 3D printed case is designed with properly sized holes to hold the lenses in place. Here is a complete list of parts listed by Yildirim, which he estimated the total cost at around $150: Parts: -Arduino Mini Pro -GY-85 9DOF IMU -USB to TTL Converter -5.6” 1280×800 LCD Display -12V Power Adapter for -2x (50mm 5x Aspheric Lenses) -3D Printed Case -Shoulder Sponge Pad -Some wires Tools: -Soldering Iron -Hot Silicone Gun -Arduino Software -Processing Software -Zip Package Although $150 is a much more affordable option than the Oculus or HoloLens, the Maker community took notice of Yildirim’s DIY project and helped to make it even more affordable. On the Instructables project page, some commenters have pointed towards wholesale parts that reportedly almost cut the price in half. Yildirim walks us step-by-step through both the hardware and software set-up, and is continuously calling upon other Makers to get involved with his OpenVR project to help make VR devices both an affordable and DIY-driven technology. “It was really rewarding. I hope OpenVR helps other VR enthusiasts to build their own VR headsets,” Yildirim writes. “I’m hoping others those build and improve upon OpenVR may share and feedback their findings to VR community.”
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Tiny Open Source Robot

Tiny Open Source Robot | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it

We watched the video introduction for this little open source robot, and while we're not 100% sure we want tiny glowing eyes watching us while we sleep, it does seem to be a nice little platform for h...

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Build Your Own Classic Film Camera With A Raspberry Pi And 8mm Lens

Build Your Own Classic Film Camera With A Raspberry Pi And 8mm Lens | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
“You can make [wacky project] with a Raspberry Pi and [oddball gizmo]!” I know, I know, it happens all the time. But this is the firs
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How the Raspberry Pi 3 Benchmarks Against Older Models

The Raspberry Pi 3 was released this week and while the big talking point is built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, it still gets a bit of a speed bump. So, let’s take a look at just how much faster it is, comparing it to the Pi 2 and a Model B+.
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Goon Squad

Raspberry Pi student challenge entry Category: Artistic Team Name: Goon Squad Team Members: Devin Attig, Michael Gale, and Chase Glenn Grade: 12 High School:...
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Out On 30/04/16 | Raspberry Pi Tutorias

Out On 30/04/16 | Raspberry Pi Tutoriasl www.raspberry-pi-tutorials.tk
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How can you get the Arduino IDE to re-load changes made outside the IDE's editor

How can you get the Arduino IDE to re-load changes made outside the IDE's editor | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
How can you get the Arduino IDE to re-load changes made outside the IDE's editor
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Join LVL1 in celebrating Arduino Day April 2nd 2016 - LVL1

Join LVL1 in celebrating Arduino Day April 2nd 2016 - LVL1 | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
The LVL1 community will be joining in on the world-wide celebration of Arduino Day on April 2nd and we’d love for you to join us.
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Internet of things: limited only by your imagination

Internet of things: limited only by your imagination | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
From Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP8266, a wide offer of any possible sensors and peripherals that can be easily glued together to deliver "connected" objects. In these few minutes I will report my personal experience in building custom solutions for real-usage everyday needs.PACE, Alberto
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Practical Arduino

Practical Arduino | Raspberry Pi | Scoop.it
Create your own Arduino-based designs, gain an in-depth knowledge of the architecture, and learn the easy-to-use Arduino language all in the context of practical projects.
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