Radical Compassion
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Curated by Jim Manske
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Good Radio Shows: 2012 Episodes

Good Radio Shows: 2012 Episodes | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

What can you do to promote peace?  James O'Dea would like to talk to you...Becoming a Peace Ambassador  Listen on Peace Talks Radio

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How Good Are You at Loving? | Psychology Today

How Good Are You at Loving? | Psychology Today | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

It is often said that love is a feeling. Since feelings are subjective, this makes it very difficult to describe love let alone determine how much someone loves another person. However, I want to take a different approach. Love, I will show, is not merely a feeling. Rather it is an activity. Moreover, this activity involves skill-building. Thus you can work at cultivating your love for another. You can get better (or worse) at loving someone. It is also possible to rank how well you are doing at loving someone. In fact, I will provide a "love inventory" that will help you to determine just how good you (or your significant others) really are at loving.

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8 ways that money can buy happiness: - Barking up the wrong tree

8 ways that money can buy happiness: - Barking up the wrong tree | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Another paper from Harvard happiness expert Daniel Gilbert (author of the bestseller Stumbling on Happiness) spells out 8 ways we can spend our money to increase happiness...

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Clayton A. Fountain: The Murderer Who Became a Monk

Clayton A. Fountain: The Murderer Who Became a Monk | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
If Clayton's transformation was authentic, then is anyone beyond the mercy of God?
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People Are Awesome: The Coffee Shop Where Everyone Pays for Everyone Else's Drinks - News - GOOD

People Are Awesome: The Coffee Shop Where Everyone Pays for Everyone Else's Drinks - News - GOOD | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
A simple, and replicable, bit of generosity is giving people a not-rude-at-all awakening in a tiny coastal coffee shop.
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From Gaming To Protesting, Social Media For Social Change Reigned In 2011

From Gaming To Protesting, Social Media For Social Change Reigned In 2011 | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
The year 2011 undoubtedly saw its fair share of tragedy and strife. From colossal natural disasters in Asia and the United States to riots in the United Kingdom to a depressing global economy, lives have been lost and hopes have been tarnished.

 

However, this year may go down in history as the point in time when the world fell apart, while learning how to put itself back together. In spite of all the turmoil that has transpired, 2011 has ushered in significant social change. Click through some of the top social good trends of the year, in no particular order.

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Nonviolent Communication Santa Cruz - Support

Nonviolent Communication Santa Cruz - Support | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Over the course of this academic year, these students have been living and learning the skills of Nonviolent Communication, growing their capacity for empathy and compassion. They are establishing an effective communication foundation to serve them for a lifetime.

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Health: The Biology of Joy

Health: The Biology of Joy | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Richard Davidson was in a lab observing a Buddhist Monk Sink deep into serene meditation when he noticed something that sent his own pulse racing. Davidson, a professor of psychology and psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin, hurriedly double-checked the data streaming to his computer from electrodes attached to the monk's skull, but there was no mistake. Electrical activity in the left prefrontal lobe of the monk's brain was shooting up at a tremendous rate. "It was exciting," Davidson recalls. "We didn't expect to see anything quite that dramatic."

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1015863,00.html#ixzz1h8HwFjJM

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Revealed – the capitalist network that runs the world - physics-math - 19 October 2011 - New Scientist

Revealed – the capitalist network that runs the world - physics-math - 19 October 2011 - New Scientist | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

AS PROTESTS against financial power sweep the world this week, science may have confirmed the protesters' worst fears. An analysis of the relationships between 43,000 transnational corporations has identified a relatively small group of companies, mainly banks, with disproportionate power over the global economy.

 

The study's assumptions have attracted some criticism, but complex systems analysts contacted by New Scientist say it is a unique effort to untangle control in the global economy. Pushing the analysis further, they say, could help to identify ways of making global capitalism more stable.

 

The idea that a few bankers control a large chunk of the global economy might not seem like news to New York's Occupy Wall Street movement and protesters elsewhere (see photo). But the study, by a trio of complex systems theorists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, is the first to go beyond ideology to empirically identify such a network of power. It combines the mathematics long used to model natural systems with comprehensive corporate data to map ownership among the world's transnational corporations (TNCs).

 

"Reality is so complex, we must move away from dogma, whether it's conspiracy theories or free-market," says James Glattfelder. "Our analysis is reality-based."

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An emerging force for peace / Waging Nonviolence - People-Powered News and Analysis

An emerging force for peace / Waging Nonviolence - People-Powered News and Analysis | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
“Building a Rainbow” is the title of an old poster I picked up somewhere along the way. The rainbow’s swath of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet layers is dazzling---and only half finished.

 

In the picture, this symbol of peace is not an idealistic dream but something real. It is under construction, with a troupe of cranes carefully maneuvering sections into place, countless trucks and overworked paint wagons, scaffolding everywhere, and a flotilla of helicopters lumbering across the sky, each with its own precarious splotch of color dangling below.

 

We live in a violent world. But we also live in a world where a growing number of people everywhere are determined to confound the assumption that there is nothing we can do about this. They gamble that violence need not have the final word. They wager that there are options. They assert that we needn’t be victims of a cycle of violent history; rather, we can dare to be active subjects of a more nonviolent history that engages and transforms the violence around us. For them, violent history isn’t a given, it is made. So, too, is a nonviolent one.

 

The poster reminds us that this is not an easy task. We are building a rainbow, not simply hoping for one. It requires the kind of gumption and creativity only barely hinted at in the poster’s fanciful construction site. It means a profusion of projects, organizations, and movements offering plausible and effective options for the well-being of all. And it means slowly discovering that these innumerable initiatives do not exist in isolation but are part of a mysterious and self-organizing design: a rainbow in the making.

 

We only have to look around us to see this growing profusion. Countless campaigns and movements (for equality, democracy, peace, social justice and sustainability). New techniques (in nonviolent communication, restorative justice, trauma healing and anti-racism training). Research and education (on empathy, forgiveness, cooperation and conflict transformation). And all reinforced by an emerging worldview stressing the interconnectedness of the planet and its inhabitants.

 

Nonviolent Peaceforce is part of this creative profusion...

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Video: Rats work to free caged mates, demonstrating empathy | SmartPlanet

Video: Rats work to free caged mates, demonstrating empathy | SmartPlanet | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Empathy was a trait thought to be reserved to higher mammals such as primates — until this experiment with rats.
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Julia Bacha: Pay Attention To Nonviolence

Julia Bacha: Pay Attention To Nonviolence | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Watch Julia Bacha's talk on why we must pay attention to nonviolence.


In many ways, 2011 was a year when the people finally had their say. From Cairo to Wall Street, throngs of frustrated yet invigorated civilians poured into the streets and took their societies' futures into their own hands. Though unpredictable, these movements grabbed the world's attention, and helped remind us that great change comes most often through the courageous actions of ordinary people...

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Maria Popova: The Science of Smiles

Maria Popova: The Science of Smiles | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
What Charles Darwin has to do with babies in the womb and a surprising secret to longevity.

 

In March, entrepreneur and health advocate Ron Gutman gave a fascinating TED talk, synthesizing a wealth of studies about smiling. Now, TEDBooks, one of 7 innovative platforms changing the future of publishing, is releasing Smile: The Astonishing Powers of a Simple Act — a fantastic short Kindle book, in which Gutman expands on his popular talk to examine the last 200 years of science on smiling, facial mimicry and mirror neurons, the tell-tell signs of fake smiles vs. authentic smiles (something that goes back to Darwin’s photographic studies), and even how smiling affects our longevity.

 

Lots of smiling can actually make you healthier. Smiling can help reduce the level of stress-enhancing hormones like cortisol, adrenaline and dopamine, increase the level of mood-enhancing hormones like endorphin and reduce overall blood pressure.” ~ Ron Gutman

 

 

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» How Is Your Personality Impacting Your Happiness? - Adventures in Positive Psychology

» How Is Your Personality Impacting Your Happiness? - Adventures in Positive Psychology | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
A great starting place to increase our level of happiness is to develop self-awareness, and a great place to develop self-awareness is to understand our personality.
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Eric Barker: Why does TV make us unhappy?

Eric Barker:  Why does TV make us unhappy? | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Research consistently shows that what brings us the most happiness is family and friends. Television competes with them for our free time and acts as a (poor) substitute...

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Sir Ken Robinson: As Science Turns Its Attention to Feeling

Sir Ken Robinson: As Science Turns Its Attention to Feeling | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
One of corollaries on the rise of science has been a schism between the arts and sciences. The sciences are thought to be all about truth and objectivity: the arts about feelings and creativity. Neither stereotype holds up.

 

Science is now discovering what artists have long understood: that nurturing our feelings is vital to the quality of our lives and that intellect and feeling are intimately connected. For the past 300 years the dominant view in Western culture has been that intelligence is mainly to do with certain sorts of logic and reason. This view evolved through the European Enlightenment and established science and a particular sort of rationalism as the main sources of intellectual authority. The achievements of this worldview have been spectacular, including the explosive growth of technologies and unprecedented advances in medicine, in communications and in our understanding of the physical universe.

 

Science has transformed human life in what is, in geological time, the beating of a wing. There have been many benefits. There's also been a high price. Among them is the exile of feeling; within science itself, in our culture in general and especially in education. For proponents of pure reason and objectivity, feelings are messy and misleading. Feelings have even had a bad press in psychology and psychiatry, the scientific disciplines that focus on human behavior and motivation. Significantly, the histories of both are mainly about negative feelings, emotional disorders and mental illness.

 

There's no doubt that there's a plentiful supply of all of these. One of the reasons is the chasm between thinking and feeling our culture has opened up. The social and economic costs are incalculable. At one end of the spectrum there are the huge numbers of people who are chronically disengaged at work or in school because they find it all pointless and unfulfilling. At the other are the jaw-dropping numbers who are critically addicted to alcohol, tobacco or drugs as a way of stimulating or suppressing their feelings.

 

There is a shift taking place in the status of feeling, within science itself and in the broader culture. The movement in Positive Psychology, spearheaded by Martin Seligman, Dan Gilbert, Sonja Lyubomirsky and others, is an important part of it. George E. Vaillant is a psychoanalyst and research psychiatrist at Harvard University. In Spiritual Evolution, he sets out a sustained defense of emotions and their role in human well being. There is an important difference between negative and positive feelings. Negative feelings include shame, hate, anger, guilt, fear and contempt. Positive feelings include joy, love, compassion, hope, happiness, forgiveness, awe, gratitude and delight. Vaillant notes that modern science is coming to accept the importance of emotions, even though the tendency in some quarters is still to accentuate the negative. He notes that in 2004, the leading American text The Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry, half a million lines in length, "devotes 100 to 600 lines each to shame, guilt, terrorism, anger, hate, and sin; thousands of lines to depression and anxiety, but only five lines to hope, one line to joy and not a single line to faith, compassion and forgiveness."

 

Vaillant argues that the negative emotions originate in the older parts of the human brain and are dedicated to individual survival. The positive emotions evolved later and are what bind us to each other: "The positive emotions are more expansive and help us to broaden and build. They widen our tolerance, expand our moral compass and enhance our creativity... Experiments document that while negative emotions narrow attention ... positive emotions, especially joy, make thought patterns far more flexible, creative, integrative and efficient." For thirty-five years, Vaillant directed the Harvard Study of Adult Development. "In the first 30 years leading the study," he says, "I learned that positive emotions were intimately connected to mental health."

 

One of the aims of Positive Psychology is to promote a greater sense of 'mindfulness': to go beyond the daily chatter of your mind and the endless agenda of tasks and anxieties that often drive it to a deeper sense of your own being and purpose. In Fully Present: the Science, Art and Practice of Mindfulness, Susan Smalley and Diana Winston show that the benefits of practicing mindfulness include reducing stress, reducing chronic physical pain, boosting the body's immune system, coping with painful life events, dealing with negative emotions, enhancing positive emotions, improving concentration, improving relationships, reducing addictive behaviors, enhancing performance in work, sports and education, and stimulating creativity. This is a to do list that we could all do with.

 

Being mindful is not about improbable poses and relentless optimism. Learning to live mindfully, say Smalley and Winston, "does not mean living in a perfect world, but rather living a full and contented life in a world in which both joys and challenges are givens." Although mindfulness does not remove the ups and downs of life, they say, "it changes how experiences like losing a job, getting a divorce, struggling at home or at school, births, marriages, illnesses, death and dying influence you and how you influence the experience ... In other words, mindfulness changes your relationship to life."

 

Being mindful also revitalizes the relationship between thinking and feeling. One of corollaries on the rise of science has been a schism between the arts and sciences. The sciences are thought to be all about truth and objectivity: the arts about feelings and creativity. Neither stereotype holds up. There can be great objectivity in the arts and huge creativity in science: and deep truth and feelings in both. As science turns its attention to feeling, it may rediscover old common ground with the arts and with the humanities too. It's on that common ground that we could restore the balance in our lives and create new approaches to education and working life that will nourish and sustain it.

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Zach & Wafeeq's curator insight, February 11, 2015 8:41 PM

[EUROPE]Intellectual Arts: Science isn't just knowledge and logic, feelings shouldn't be shut out when dealing with science (kind of like how the U.S. of A. does. Europe has made great advancements due to acceptance of feelings AND the application towards science.

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Desmond Tutu: Made for Goodness

Desmond Tutu:  Made for Goodness | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
We are each made for goodness, love and compassion. Our lives are transformed as much as the world is when we live with these truths. Congratulations to Arianna Huffington and The Huffington Post for offering a new way to celebrate these truths with the launch of Good News! The world needs your acts and compassionate loving goodness.

 

In the darkest days of the struggle to end apartheid, it was possible for some to succumb to the endless bad news of violence and torture systematically directed against people because of the color of their skin or those who had a vision of our oneness as people. But we were always upheld and strengthened by the good news of those whose actions reminded us that we are each God's partners in a love and justice that includes all...

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Demonstrating Empathy And Compassion Reaches Employees And Improves The Bottom Line - Investors.com

Connecting with employees brings out the best in them. Great employees are five to 10 times more productive than average ones are.
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Holiday Happiness: 8 Things To Do Today

Holiday Happiness: 8 Things To Do Today | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it
Things that boost happiness are always worth revisiting around the holidays. Why now? Because these happiness habits can help us through the turbulence that swirls around the holidays.
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Occupy Our Minds: To Empower Ourselves, We Need to Plug the 7 Holes In Our Heads | The Big Picture

We need to Occupy our own minds before we can become empowered. Specifically, people all have built-in bugs in our brains.
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Brene Brown: The Power Of Vulnerability

Brene Brown: The Power Of Vulnerability | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Watch research professor Brené Brown discuss the importance of opening up oneself and feeling vulnerable, then read her follow-up post...

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Home

Home | Radical Compassion | Scoop.it

Here's an interesting look at some of the thinking behind the Occupy Movement.  I'd love to see an article about how NVC could support the movement in a future issue...

 

Jim

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Graham Hill: Less stuff, more happiness | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Writer and designer Graham Hill asks: Can having less stuff, in less room, lead to more happiness? He makes the case for taking up less space, and lays out three rules for editing your life.
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