Media 21 Fall 2011 Research on Racial Profiling
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Media 21 Fall 2011 Research on Racial Profiling
This is a reseach project on racial profiling among police officers and other authorities, that use the undocumented action of Racial Profling to narrow their suspects or potential suspects in a criminal investigation.
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Racial Profiling: The Parisian Police Experience.

Racial Profiling: The Parisian Police Experience. | Media 21 Fall 2011 Research on Racial Profiling | Scoop.it

The controversy over racial profiling in policing that is explored within the pages of the

Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice echoes the violent debates within French society regarding the police – debates that take place not only in specialized journals but in the outside world as well: One only has to think about the repeated recurrence of urban riots, or ‘‘race riots,’’ to use the term common in the United States (Waddington, Jobard, and King 2009). One of our research projects, which focused on racial profiling, has been the source of numerous discussions in France (Open Justice 2009; Le´vy and Jobard 2010)....

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Feeling the sting of racial profiling; Deputy chief says police must stop denying the issue exists and support policies that address it.(Opinion)

Feeling the sting of racial profiling; Deputy chief says police must stop denying the issue exists and support policies that address it.(Opinion) | Media 21 Fall 2011 Research on Racial Profiling | Scoop.it

The following is excerpted from a speech delivered Wednesday by Keith Forde, deputy chief of the Toronto police, on the subject of racial profiling

This subject matter is extremely controversial and evokes different emotions.

Often, people who have made the conscious decision not to police based on stereotypes and misgivings, but on evidence and facts are lumped in with those who do.

Many times discussions break down when officers feel that they have been unfairly labelled as racially profiling, when they are not.

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Global Issues In Context

Global Issues In Context | Media 21 Fall 2011 Research on Racial Profiling | Scoop.it

Race and the Police.(Long Island Weekly Desk)(Editorial)

        -Some people think the Suffolk County Police Department has a problem with racial profiling -- stopping drivers based on hunches and preconceptions about the way they look. The department hopes to resolve the issue by compiling records of the racial backgrounds of the drivers it stops.......

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Race profiling an ugly reality

Race profiling an ugly reality | Media 21 Fall 2011 Research on Racial Profiling | Scoop.it

The Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario has ruled a black postal worker was a victim of racial profiling by a white police officer.

Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair has said that verdict will be challenged in court because it sets "an impossibly high standard" for police officers. But even in fighting the verdict, Blair did not deny "the existence of bias or the possibility of racial profiling."

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Racial Profiling and Police Subculture.

Racial Profiling and Police Subculture. | Media 21 Fall 2011 Research on Racial Profiling | Scoop.it

Racial profiling is the practice of subjecting citizens to increased surveillance or scrutiny based on racial or ethic factors rather than ‘‘reasonable suspicion.’’ The current debate (Satzewich and Shaffir 2009; Henry and Tator 2011) focuses on whether intention matters in considering racial-profiling practices. Satzewich and Shaffir (2009) argue that the intentions of policing agents are an important consideration for understanding racial profiling. In their rejoinder, Henry and Tator (2011) invoke the principle that ‘‘racism/racial profiling is to be judged primarily by its consequences in creating inequality for certain groups’’ (66); they cite case law that recognizes that the motivation or intention of the perpetrator is irrelevant to the judgement that racial discrimination has occurred.....

 

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UNDOCUMENTED CRIMINAL PROCEDURE.

UNDOCUMENTED CRIMINAL PROCEDURE. | Media 21 Fall 2011 Research on Racial Profiling | Scoop.it

For more than two decades, criminal procedure scholars have debated what role, if any, race should play in the context of policing. Although a significant part of this debate has focused on racial profiling, or the practice of employing race as basis for suspicion, criminal procedure scholars have paid little attention to the fact that the U.S. Supreme Court has sanctioned this practice in a number of cases at the intersection of immigration law and criminal procedure. Not withstanding that these cases raise similar questions to those at the heart of legal and policy debates about racial profiling, they are largely overlooked in the criminal procedure scholarship on race and policing. We refer to these cases as the undocumented cases. While there are a number of doctrinal and conceptual reasons that explain their marginalization, none of these reasons are satisfying given the importance of the undocumented cases to debates about race, racial profiling, and the Fourth Amendment. The undocumented cases import a pernicious aspect of immigration exceptionalism into Fourth Amendment doctrine—namely, that the government can legitimately employ race when it is enforcing immigration laws. In so doing, the cases constitutionalize racial profiling against Latinos and unduly expand governmental power and discretion beyond the borders of immigration enforcement. This weakens the Fourth Amendment and enables racial profiling in the context of ordinary police investigations.

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