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Habitable Zones Around Alien Suns May Depend on Chemistry

Habitable Zones Around  Alien Suns May Depend on Chemistry | Quimica | Scoop.it
Trace elements in such stars may influence their habitable zones, where planets with life could dwell.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Rescooped by Matias Mujica from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Pinterest - chemistry resources

Pinterest - chemistry resources | Quimica | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Resources to Teach and Learn Chemistry

Resources to Teach and Learn Chemistry | Quimica | Scoop.it

Chem Collective is a project designed and maintained by Carnegie Mellon University's chemistry department and the National Science Digital Library. On Chem Collective you will find virtual labs for chemistry experiments, simulations, visualizations, tutorials, and auto-graded problems. 

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Rescooped by Matias Mujica from Amazing Science
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Basic Rules of Chemistry Can Be Broken Under High Pressure, Calculations Show

Basic Rules of Chemistry Can Be Broken Under High Pressure, Calculations Show | Quimica | Scoop.it
A study suggests atoms can bond not only with electrons in their outer shells, but also via those in their supposedly sacrosanct inner shells

 

Inside atoms, electrons are organized into energy levels, called shells, which can be thought of as buckets of increasing size that can each hold only a fixed number of electrons. Atoms prefer to have filled buckets, so if their outer shell is missing just one or two electrons, they are eager borrow form another atom that might have one or two to spare. But sometimes, a new study suggests, atoms can be incited to share not just their outer valence electrons, but those from their full inner shells. “It breaks our doctrine that the inner-shell electrons never react, never enter the chemistry domain,” says Mao-sheng Miao, a chemist at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the Beijing Computational Science Research Center in China. Miao predicted such bonds using so-called first-principles calculations, which rely purely on the known laws of physics, and reported his findings in a paper published September 23, 2013, in Nature Chemistry. Such bonding has yet to be demonstrated in a lab. Nevertheless, “I’m very confident that this is real,” he says.

 

His calculations show that two possible molecules could form between cesium and fluorine atoms under extremely high pressure—about 30 gigapascals (higher than the pressure at the bottom of the ocean, but less than at Earth’s center). Cesium, all the way on the left side of the periodic table, has one superfluous electron in its outer, or sixth shell. Fluorine, on the other hand, is toward the far right of the table, just next to the column of noble gases with completely full shells (which is why noble gases are notoriously unreactive—they have little incentive to gain or lose electrons) and is one electron short of a full outer shell. “Under normal pressure, cesium gives an electron completely to fluorine and they bind together,” Miao says. “But under high pressure, the electrons from cesium’s inner shells start to form molecules with fluorine.”

 

Miao identified two compounds that could form and remain stable up to very high pressures: cesium trifluoride (CsF3), where cesium has shared its one valence electron and two from an inner shell with three fluorine atoms, and cesium pentafluoride (CsF5), where cesium shares its valence electron and four inner-shell electrons to five fluorine atoms. “That forms a very beautiful molecule, like a starfish,” Miao says. Both the shape of the resulting molecules and the possibility of their formation are “very surprising,” says chemist Roald Hoffmann, a professor emeritus at Cornell University, who was not involved in the calculations. “This is the first clear case of an alkali metal not only losing its single easily ionized valence electron in bonding, but also ‘breaking into the core’ in its bonding with several fluorines.”

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Perfluorotributylamine: New Greenhouse Gas Identified | Chemistry, Climatology | Sci-News.com

Perfluorotributylamine: New Greenhouse Gas Identified | Chemistry, Climatology | Sci-News.com | Quimica | Scoop.it
Perfluorotributylamine - a chemical used in the electrical industry - has the potential to contribute significantly to global warming.

Via David Simpson
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Rescooped by Matias Mujica from Artículos CIENCIA-TECNOLOGIA
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QUÍMICA INORGÁNICA: Aprende a Formular compuestos químicos Inorgánicos

QUÍMICA INORGÁNICA: Aprende a Formular compuestos químicos Inorgánicos | Quimica | Scoop.it

Aplicación web gratuita que enseña a formular y nombrar compuestos químicos inorgánicos. Sus autores Esteban C, Monica Cristina T y Nacho C. lo desarrollaron de tal manera, que los estudiantes aprendan de forma divertida a formular y nombrar compuestos químicos.


Via Gumersindo Fernández
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Ana Girón's curator insight, November 19, 2013 6:52 AM

El diseño es muy actual con lo que puede ser mucho más atractiva para los alumnos que otras webs dedicadas a la formulación. Puede utilizarse en 3º perfectamente, incluso con la aplicación para el móvil. También es estupendo la opción de descargarte en pdf o en formato doc las actividades. 

Rescooped by Matias Mujica from Marisol y Rafa
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Premio Nobel de Química 2013

Premio Nobel de Química 2013 | Quimica | Scoop.it
A estas alturas del año, seguro que todos ustedes saben que la Real Academia de Ciencias de Suecia ha otorgado el Nobel de Química 2013 al investigador austríaco Martin Karplus, al sudafricano Michael Levitt y al israelí Arieh Warshel por el...

 

Más noticias sobre informática en "Actualidad  Informática"http://adf.ly/8oMpl


Via Barzanallana
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Implanted biofuel cell converts bug's chemistry into electricity

Implanted biofuel cell converts bug's chemistry into electricity | Quimica | Scoop.it
Cleveland OH (SPX) Jan 10, 2012 - An insect's internal chemicals can be converted to electricity, potentially providing power for sensors, recording devices or to control the bug, a group of researchers at Case Western Reserve Unive...

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Rescooped by Matias Mujica from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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Investors Look for Chemistry, Not Just Big Ideas

Investors Look for Chemistry, Not Just Big Ideas | Quimica | Scoop.it
VC Fred Wilson says the quality of your ideas matter to investors. But your relationships with them matter more.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Chemistry professor developing sustainable bioplastics

Chemistry professor developing sustainable bioplastics | Quimica | Scoop.it

A Colorado State University chemistry professor has developed several patent-pending chemical processes that would create sustainable bioplastics from renewable resources for use on everything from optical fibers and contact lenses to furniture and automobile parts.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Rescooped by Matias Mujica from Natural Products Chemistry Breaking News
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Quantitative molecular networking to profile marine cyanobacterial metabolomes

Quantitative molecular networking to profile marine cyanobacterial metabolomes | Quimica | Scoop.it

Untargeted liquid chromatography-MS (LC-MS) is used to rapidly profile crude natural product (NP) extracts; however, the quantity of data produced can become difficult to manage. Molecular networking based on MS/MS data visualizes these complex data sets to aid their initial interpretation. Here, we developed an additional visualization step for the molecular networking workflow to provide relative and absolute quantitation of a specific compound in an extract. The new visualization also facilitates combination of several metabolomes into one network, and so was applied to an MS/MS data set from 20 crude extracts of cultured marine cyanobacteria. The resultant network illustrates the high chemical diversity present among marine cyanobacteria. It is also a powerful tool for locating producers of specific metabolites. In order to dereplicate and identify culture-based sources of known compounds, we added MS/MS data from 60 pure NPs and NP analogs to the 20-strain network. This dereplicated six metabolites directly and offered structural information on up to 30 more. Most notably, our visualization technique allowed us to identify and quantitatively compare several producers of the bioactive and biosynthetically intriguing lipopeptide malyngamide C. Our most prolific producer, a Panamanian strain of Okeania hirsuta (PAB10FEB10-01), was found to produce at least 0.024 mg of malyngamide C per mg biomass (2.4%, w/dw) and is now undergoing genome sequencing to access the corresponding biosynthetic machinery.

 

 

The Journal of Antibiotics , (27 November 2013)

doi:10.1038/ja.2013.120

Quantitative molecular networking to profile marine cyanobacterial metabolomes

Jacob R Winnikoff, Evgenia Glukhov, Jeramie Watrous, Pieter C Dorrestein and William H Gerwick

 

 

 


Via NatProdChem
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La química explica los variados colores de la sangre de los animales: rojo, azul, marrón, verde, amarillo, naranja…

La química explica los variados colores de la sangre de los animales: rojo, azul, marrón, verde, amarillo, naranja… | Quimica | Scoop.it

Casi todos los seres humanos tenemos la sangre de color rojo, excepción hecha de los reyes, emperadores y otros sujetos de noble cuna, que la tienen azul. Muchos animales también la tienen roja, incluido el león, a pesar de ser el Rey de la Selva.


Via Gumersindo Fernández
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Frederick Sanger: ganador de dos premios Nobel de Química

Frederick Sanger: ganador de dos premios Nobel de Química | Quimica | Scoop.it
Frederick Sanger es el único científico de la historia galardonado en dos ocasiones con el premio Nobel de Química.

Via Gumersindo Fernández
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