Quest 2 & 3
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Retired

Retired | Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it

Photo taken with permission of Russell Finnerty

Simone Finnerty's insight:

My Dad has been retired now for almost 6 years. There are a few things that he has become obsessed with since retiring, one of which has been the maintenance of his lawn. This raises some very genuine OHS risks for my dad. However, he seems to have been able to reduce some potential risks. The lawn mower itself was upgraded several years ago to one that, when a lever on the handle is pushed, it will actually move itself along without needing to be pushed. This has greatly reduced the risk of muscular skeletal injuries pushing a machine may pose.

He changes the directional patterns in which he mows but he will also place the wheelie bin in a position which reduces the walk time and manual handling when emptying the clippings.

Over the years, the meticulous way in which he cares for his lawn has significantly reduced risks such as stones or rocks flying up when mowing because I can almost guarantee there are none to be found in that lawn (unless he's had a recent visit from the Grandkids).

I can also guarantee that he will always be wearing a hat thus reducing potential exposure risks to his head. Although I cannot garantee that he will be wearing a shirt.

The biggest hazard for my dad would probably be the break down of his lawn mower. The potential for some serious mental stress if he was unable to conduct his weekly routine, until it was fixed, is a real risk.

 

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OHS In Schools - A Practical Guide For School Leaders

OHS In Schools - A Practical Guide For School Leaders | Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it
Simone Finnerty's insight:

This guide (although published 5 years ago) has content that covers several important topics.

It states 'Improving a school’s OHS performance has a direct impact on its budget.' It goes on to say that it can reduce sick leave days, need of relief teachers etc. This is a very clear example of how preventative measures can have a large an everlasting effect on the future. If teachers are supported and appreciated in the workplace they are likely to take less sick leave, ruducing replacement costs and improving the overall health and well being of staff.

It also address some key risks in schools. This information is invaluable to all workers in this envronment. This guide ends with a variety of contacts associated with OHS for teachers.

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Teachers Handbook - NSW Department of Education & Communities

Teachers Handbook - NSW Department of Education & Communities | Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it
Simone Finnerty's insight:

A specific handbook for a specific occupation. PERFECT! Something that provides extensive infomation specifically.

Chapter 6 Occupational Health and Safety covers all the people in the workplace and DET as the employer ensuring the health and safety of employees in public schools. It covers risk management and hazards which will ensure that the employees are able to handle them correctly when they arise. It also links several other external resources covering a variety of policies and guidlines as well as links to Australian legislation and training resources. A very informative handbook which is currently 'being revised and completed chapters will be included progressively'

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Liquor manager

Liquor manager | Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it

Photo provided by David Finnerty with permission, 11 April 2014.

Simone Finnerty's insight:

Pictured is my brother at work. He is the manager at a liquor outlet in Sydney. The biggest OHS issues for him are the manual handling hazard as there is always large and/or bulky stock to be moved. Body stress to the muscle or skeletal system can have a serious impact when safety procedures are not followed correctly. This may even cause the risk of impact hazards to rise, stock being moved around the store can cause potential trip or slip hazards. As with any liquid the potential for spills to cause impact hazards always remains a high risk.

 

Mechanical hazards become a problem when workers who are not trained properly, or do not pay attention, on some equipment can cause an increase in OHS issues. As can be seen in the photo gravity will always be an issue so long as the shelves remain stocked high, which then leads into impact hazards.

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Army

Army | Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it

Photo provided by Greg Vins with permission, 10 April 2014.

Simone Finnerty's insight:

In this photo is my other half working tirelessly on a truck at his current place of employment. As there are several different jobs he performs in the Army I will focus only on the possible safety risks of him performing the task pictured.

 

He is seen fixing one of the vehicles at work. There are several OHS issues that plague this type of work. Starting with mechanical issues, there is potential for serious harm to be caused by every sharp or protruding part in the engine bay. The vehicles are loaded with chemical and biological hazards that may cause ill health to anyone within close quarters, particularly repetitive exposure. There are heat sources that have the potential to burn as the engine is used. But there also the risks that are there due to the gravity if the bonnet was to fall or his foot was to slip luckily all defence personnel are provided with steel cap boots, reducing the risk of injury if something was to fall on their feet.

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Voice Care for Teachers

Voice Care for Teachers | Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it
Simone Finnerty's insight:

This one I scooped as it made an interesting claim 'Teachers should not accept that voice problems are occupational hazard. They can be prevented with good voice care.'

Obviously prevention is the best way to avoid occupational hazards. So for preventable hazards, should something like voice coaching be mandatory for teachers?

With this voice care method I assume it would reduce the risk of voice related problems in the school work environment. Therefore reducing the number of teacher who lose their voice.

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OHS Risk Management

OHS Risk Management | Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it
Simone Finnerty's insight:

Although this is a Victorian scoop, the content easily transfers nation wide. Available on this sight not only the PDF versions of OHS Risk Management Procedure, Workplace Inspection Procedure and Safe Work Procedure is also has links to a risk management form, templates and checklists associated with savfe work practices. This link covers just about ever aspect associated with OHS issues in the school environment. Policies and procedures are readily available under the heading of health, safety and worksafe making it easily navigated and accessible. Another invaluable resource for use by  teachers particularly in the state of Victoria.

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Managing Risks in School Curriculum Activities

Managing Risks in School Curriculum Activities | Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it
Simone Finnerty's insight:

This link give great suggestions on how to manage risks but also uses external resource planners and templates to achieve this.

It details the neccessary information needed in order to risk assess a curriculum activity making it a wonderful resource for teachers in QLD. 

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Call centre

Call centre | Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it

Photo provided by Renee Cashmore with permission, received 10 April 2014.

Simone Finnerty's insight:

As a call centre employee my friend Renee has several OHS issues that plague her daily. For her the largest OHS issue is the stress on her body. She stated that due to the space in which she works it has the potential to cause some serious harm to her body. There are steps available under each desk for employee’s to use to reduce some posture issues. As the desk height is not adjustable she is unable to fit her legs under the desk while using the step but is also unable to put her feet flat on the floor and be able to utilise the desk efficiently therefore she is unable to take advantage of this equipment.  Due to these circumstances she has had to seek medical attention for her back.

 

As seen in the photo, there is a coffee cup on the desk posing the potential for hazards resulting from hot liquids. There are also some electrical hazards as the employees use phones and computers for all of their duties.

 

The people that use the call centre are generally calling to receive medical advice and this has the potential to lead to high stress situations. She indicated that sometimes there are several calls waiting in queues which can cause work-related fatigue as there is times when there are no breaks.

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Primary Teaching

Primary Teaching | Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it

Photgraph provided by Tammy Finnerty with permission, received 10 April 2014.

Simone Finnerty's insight:

Here pictured is my sister Tammy, as a primary school teacher there are lots of OHS issues to face each day. In this particular picture she is hanging the children art work on the wall.

 

The majority of OHS issues that she faces are those of stresses to the body and impact hazards. She stated that the only option for using a step ladder is the one shown, a two-step A frame. No other device is available for use. As for hanging the pictures, she said that she has used thumbtacks with several small instances of pin pricks (and a few paper cuts). Gravity in this situation is a key issue. One wrong step and she would fall, not only the option of falling to the floor but, as can be seen, a table is also nearby.

 

She stated that organisation of the room is an integral part of maintaining safety in the classroom. All objects are to be stored in their correct location and out of the way in order to create no (or less) hazards for a teacher or student to trip or slip.

 

Fatigue and stress are also a large part of hazards that my sister faces daily. She has several students that are classed as high need, particularly with behavioural issues. This can cause some dangers, to herself as well as other students, within the classroom and for this she has strict rules on ‘keeping our hands and feet to ourselves’.

 

Some added fatigue stresses are added to my sisters’ day as she has three beautiful children at home, a 13 year old, 4 year old and a newly added 3.5 month old. She is an amazing mother and teacher and is able to handle each and every issue (OHS and otherwise) with confidence and tremendous tenacity.

 

 

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