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PYP Exhibition – Video Inspiration to take Action Six Different Ways ...

PYP Exhibition – Video Inspiration to take Action Six Different Ways ... | PYP | Scoop.it
“Taking Action” is a big part of the PYP and also a big part in our Exhibition. Before we even began, I was hearing the deafening roar of, “We are going to hold a sale…”. In reading the idea behind action as a key component of ...
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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | PYP | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


Via Seth Dixon
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Italy's regional divisions

"150 years after its unification, Italy remains riven by regional differences." For more of these videos, visit http://arcg.is/1IeK3dT


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brielle blais's curator insight, March 25, 2018 6:18 PM
This showcases geography because it is an example of how a country can be so divided even though everyone is from the same homeland. However, to Italians, their geographic location in Italy is very important. People take a lot of pride in which region they are from, whether it's between the politics of the north and south Italy or the different dialects spoken between the different regions. The divided is also seen economically as northern Italy is wealthier, and southern Italy is filled with more poverty and unemployment. 
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 19, 2018 4:18 AM
The disunity in Italy has been going on for centuries.  With the north and south basically completely different and divided.  The north is wealthier than the south.  Dialect and language even differ With the two. In the south poverty and unemployment is high.  A Majority of italys prime ministers came from the north.  Many people in the north want to to get full independence for the south.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, October 3, 2018 6:11 PM
Originally Italy was broken up into vast amounts of city states. However, they were eventually able to unify Italy. To thus day Italy still has significant political differences. Generally the North has always been more affluent than the South. Poverty and unemployment rates are much higher in the South of Italy. Italy also has strong regional dialects that sometimes do not even resemble Italian dialect that contributes to there political differences. The North in recent years has also been calling for full Independence. It seems that if someone doesn't solve Italy's economic issues and tries to unite the nation Italy may divide as a country.
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Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills

Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills | PYP | Scoop.it

"As the image above shows, The Times reports from all over the globe. We have journalists in more than 30 international news bureaus worldwide, and every day we publish news, feature stories, videos, slide shows and more from dozens of countries around the world. Our new 'Country of the Week' feature celebrates this abundance to help build students’ geography skills. A weekly interactive quiz will first introduce students to a country via a recent video or photograph, then ask them to find that place on a map. Next, the quiz will focus on the demographics and culture of the country. Finally, we’ll include links to recent reporting from that place in case they, or you, would like to go further.

In 'Why Geography Matters,' Harm de Blij wrote that geography is 'a superb antidote to isolationism and provincialism,' and argued that 'the American public is the geographically most illiterate society of consequence on the planet, at a time when United States power can affect countries and peoples around the world.'

This spatial illiteracy, geographers say, can leave citizens without a framework to think about foreign policy questions more substantively. 'The paucity of geographical knowledge means there is no check on misleading public representations about international matters,' said Alec Murphy, a professor of geography at the University of Oregon."

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, geography matters.


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bintathletics's comment, September 11, 2017 6:46 AM
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Why geography matters for students now more than ever

Why geography matters for students now more than ever | PYP | Scoop.it
Students need to know human geography; they need to understand the relationships that exist between cultures.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 2017 4:30 PM

This is more example of me preaching to the choir, but I hope that this will arm you with resources to use in discussions with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  This is a great article to put into my new tag of article that discuss why geography matters.   

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

Brandon Fourie's curator insight, May 23, 2017 10:58 AM
Very interesting read! 
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2017 5:13 PM

This is one more example of me preaching to the choir, but I hope that this will arm you with resources to use in discussions with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  This is a great article to put into my new tag of article that discuss why geography matters.   

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

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Google Maps Smarty Pins

Google Maps Smarty Pins | PYP | Scoop.it
Smarty Pins is a Google Maps based geography and trivia game.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2017 7:05 PM

As stated in a review of Smarty Pins on Mashable, "Google unveiled a fun new game this week that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  Called 'Smarty Pins' the game starts players off with 1,000 miles (or 1,609 kilometers if they're not based in the United States), and asks them to drop a pin on the city that corresponds with the correct answer to a given question." 

 

This game is wonderfully addictive...I haven't enjoyed a mapping trivia platform this much since I discovered GeoGuessr.  How far can you get before you run out of miles?  

 

Tagsgoogle, fun, mapping, place, trivia.

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Making Globes

"Colored printed sections showing the map of the world are cut to shape then pasted onto the surface of the globes and a protective coat of varnish is added. Narrator recounts the fact that lots of the workers have been there for over 30 years and quips: 'While the rest of the mankind does its best to blow the world up, they like building a new one.'"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 14, 2016 9:52 PM

I love watching globes made by hand and this vintage video shows the process of globes being made in London in 1955.  While most globe production is mechanized today, you can also watch the Bellerby company use gorgeous artistry to handcraft globes today.   

 

Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, artgeo-inspiration.

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100 Great Teaching Images

100 Great Teaching Images | PYP | Scoop.it

"Nature and humankind are both great artists, and when they join forces, amazing masterpieces can be produced. Today Bright Side has collected for you works in which the combined efforts of mother nature and photographic artists have captured magic moments showing the wondrous diversity of modern life and the natural world. Pictured above is the Westerdok District in Amsterdam."

 

Tags: images, art, landscape, worldwide.


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Mireia Civís Zaragoza's curator insight, December 29, 2016 2:36 PM
fotos espectaculars
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 9, 2017 7:10 AM
100 Great Teaching Images
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Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion?

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ROCAFORT's curator insight, December 6, 2016 7:14 AM
Human Population Through Time
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, December 6, 2016 7:23 PM
Pour la DNL seconde
 
Jordyn Reeves's curator insight, January 11, 2017 8:44 PM
This relates to our topic by showing that our population is growing rapidly. By the time 2025 there will be more than 11 billion people on the Earth. But we have enough resources to last us.
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GeoInquiries - Grade 4 Interdisciplinary

GeoInquiries - Grade 4 Interdisciplinary | PYP | Scoop.it

"GeoInquiries are designed to be fast and easy-to-use instructional resources that incorporate advanced web mapping technology. Each 15-minute activity in a collection is intended to be presented by the instructor from a single computer/projector classroom arrangement. No installation, fees, or logins are necessary to use these materials and software.

The Elementary, Grade 4 GeoInquiry collection is under-development."


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QUIZ: Can you match the country to what it used to be called?

QUIZ: Can you match the country to what it used to be called? | PYP | Scoop.it
France has not always been called France.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 1, 2016 3:49 AM

Everybody know that Istanbul was Constantinople, but some countries have also known by other names.  This quiz of 18 countries is fairly easily, but I must object to the website's characterization for a perfect score: "You're basically a professional historian."  The word you were looking for was geographer...and if you now have a song stuck in your head, here is the They Might Be Giants version and the old school Four Lads version of Istanbul (Not Constantinople)--you're welcome. 

 

Tags: trivia, games, place, toponyms.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 2, 2016 1:46 AM

I am a citizen of which country?

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The Evolution of the World Map

The Evolution of the World Map | PYP | Scoop.it

"Use our interactive In Charted Waters tool which shows information & visuals on how our knowledge of the world map has evolved."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 19, 2016 7:41 PM

This interactive map/timeline takes users (shared before but the URL has been updated here) around the world through the major events representing the expansion of human knowledge.  Admittedly, this is represents knowledge from a Eurocentric perspective, but that is somewhat appropriate in this instance since that was the largest store of spatial knowledge as this global information coalesced.  Users can visualize the coordination of absolute space and realize the actions undertaken that shifted geography from its predecessor, cosmology.  Each achievement came through intensive exploration and the detailed mapping of those endeavors.

 

Tagshistoricalmappingcartography, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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An Atlas of the Vikings

An Atlas of the Vikings | PYP | Scoop.it

"Scandinavia's history has always been shaped by its geography and orientation to the sea.  The shortage of good farmland in Scandinavia on the whole, however, compelled the Vikings to journey outward. Thus, the sea became an omnipresent part of life. Not only did the barrenness of the soil make the sea an important source of food, but the region's terrain made water the easier mode of travel for the thinly scattered populations of Scandinavia."


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Jamie Strickland's comment, January 12, 2016 8:45 PM
Seth, this is fantastic!! I am interested in using StoryMaps more in my classes, so this really inspires me!!
Michelle Nimchuk's curator insight, January 26, 2016 4:47 PM

This story map was created by a student who was inspired after watching a History Channel's Viking show.  Incredible demonstration of allowing students to take an interest and fly with it.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, March 23, 2016 10:07 AM

A student of mine produced this excellent Story Map after being inspired by the History Channel's TV show, Vikings.  History is so often shaped by geographic factors and better understood with maps.     

 

Tags: mapping, historical, StoryMap,  ESRI, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway.

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Best GeoEd Scoops of 2015

Best GeoEd Scoops of 2015 | PYP | Scoop.it

"Every year I create a filtered tab with some of the best scoops here on Geography Education for that given calendar year.  If you disagree with the committee of one, I'd be glad to hear which one's were your favorites."


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The Science & Education team's comment, December 26, 2015 7:46 PM
Congratulations Seth, your Scoop.it feed is one of the joys of my day and has thrown up dozens of sites that I would never have been aware of. Thank you
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Mercator Puzzle Redux

Mercator Puzzle Redux | PYP | Scoop.it

"Play this interactive game--move the 15 red countries to their appropriate locations to turn the countries green.  If you give up, you can double click on a red country to locate it (but it will turn blue)." 


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allbuild.construction's comment, February 14, 2018 5:33 AM
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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 16, 2018 2:22 PM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance; Patterns and Trends
Matt Manish's curator insight, February 17, 2018 12:18 AM
This is an interesting quiz to test your world geography skills. It gives you the shape of a country in red and you have to place the shape on the correct country. If you can't find the correct country, just double tap the shape and it will show you which country it belongs to. This was definitely a challenge for me since I only got two of the countries correct. I found particular difficulty with locating the smaller countries with less features that stand out. Although I only got two answers right, I did enjoy this map quiz because it helped me to realize that I should brush up on my world geography skills more to help me stay informed with what's going on in the world.
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Homeland of tea

Homeland of tea | PYP | Scoop.it

"China is the world’s biggest tea producer, selling many varieties of tea leaves such as green tea, black tea, oolong tea, white tea and yellow tea. Different regions are famous for growing different types of tea. Hangzhou is famous for producing a type of green tea called Longjing or the Dragon Well tea. Tea tastes also vary regionally. Drinkers in Beijing tend to prefer jasmine tea while in Shanghai prefer green tea. Processing raw tea leaves for consumption is a time and labor-intensive activity and still done by hand in many areas in China. The Chinese tea industry employs around 80 million people as farmers, pickers and sales people. Tea pickers tend to be seasonal workers who migrate from all parts of the country during harvest time. In 2016, China produced 2.43 million tons of tea."


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brielle blais's curator insight, May 2, 2018 1:45 PM
This shows the importance of a product to a countries economy, culture, and use of physical geography. China is the worlds biggest producer of tea. This stimulates the economy greatly, and gives 80 millions people jobs as farmers, pickets and in sales. Exporting the tea to other countries also helps the economy. The workers are seasonal, and travel to the tea come harvest season. This also boost the economy in the travel sector. Tea is also hugely part of the cultural geography of China as it is believed to bring wisdom and lift the spirit to a higher level. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, May 3, 2018 2:49 AM
(East Asia) China, the founder of tea, is the largest producer of the most consumed drink in the world. With such an enormous country, regional differences between tea cultivation and culture naturally developed. There are approximately 80 million people involved in tea cultivation, which is non-mechanized in many parts. Linking tea with sanctity, farmers work long hours and come from across China seasonally.

A series of images follows the article. Most remarkable are the depictions of old and young Chinese farmers handpicking tea leaves, the vast plantations and agricultural architecture, and the tea tourism industry
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 4, 2018 3:04 AM
This article looks into how the popular beverage, tea, is produced. China is not only the world's largest producer, but also creates many different types of tea including green, black and dragons well. The drink was discovered in 2737 by a Chinese emperor, and the industry employs approximately 80 million people and it produced 2.43 million tons in 2016
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Why geography matters now more than ever

Why geography matters now more than ever | PYP | Scoop.it

"Students need to know human geography; they need to understand the relationships that exist between cultures."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 6, 2017 7:08 PM

You might have seen this article on PBS's Teacher's Lounge, but here is a link to the original (and a good reason to give a shout-out to #worldgeochat on Twitter Tuesday nights at 9pm EST).  This might be seen as another example of me preaching to the choir, but I hope that this will arm you with resources to use in discussions with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  This is a great article to put into my new tag of article that discuss why geography matters.   

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, September 5, 2017 4:38 PM
Geographic concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships; Geographic Perpsective
Uart.com's curator insight, September 8, 2017 10:22 AM

Geography is more important than ever to explain and understand the art market in globalization and digitization turn.

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Syria's war: Who is fighting and why [Updated]

"After four-plus years of fighting, Syria's war has killed at least hundreds of thousands of people and displaced millions. And, though it started as a civil war, it's become much more than that. It's a proxy war that has divided much of the Middle East, and has drawn in both Russia and the United States. To understand how Syria got to this place, it helps to start at the beginning and watch it unfold."


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Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, October 29, 2018 1:37 AM
The war in Syria has been devastating to Syrian's inhabitants. After six years of this conflict it has become a mess and is divided into four sections or groups, all backed different foreign backers. The backers have know become so confused on who there fighting for and what there fighting for, that is how messy this war has gotten. The use of chemical warfare has killed hundreds of thousands of people and displaced millions. As to why there is a major Syrian refugee crisis. The conflict started as an internal war against Assad and rebels. This small civil war has know turned into a global conflict. I wish I could say what foreign countries are backing who and why but the lines are very blurred and there has been many back stabbing. All these foreign powers entering this war has established Syria as a great power dispute. The Assad and rebels conflict also brew the other two sections that are fighting in this region the Kurds who want their own nation. The Kurds are the largest cultural and ethnic group without a country. The entrance of the Kurds in the fighting brought in more foreign countries to either support their efforts or squash the Kurds hopes of obtaining a nation of there own. Then you have ISIS who formed as a branch out of the original rebels because there was an internal dispute. Overall this war is bloody and will never end if all these four sections cant come to an agreement. If there is no determination for peace there will never be peace.
David Stiger's curator insight, October 31, 2018 10:59 PM
Hearing about the news in Syria is usually tragic and frustrating. It is also equally confusing and this video helped to sort out its causes and important transformations over time. Even with the video's succinct explanation, the conflict is still a quagmire to understand. The fighting began during the 2011 Arab Spring when peaceful Syrian protesters were gunned down by Assad's military forces. Instead of backing down and caving into the violent repression, the Syrian civilians retaliated with small arms fire and were joined by Syrian army defectors. The now belligerent protesters formed their own rebel army, causing Syria to erupt into a civil war. Then Islamic extremists, including a terrorist groups, joined the rebels. Countries like Turkey and Jordan began funding and arming the rebels while Iran - a Shiite country - provided support to Assad. Appalled by the out-of-control death toll, the United States began training and arming the rebels - some of whom were from Al Qaeda! Assad's chemical weapons attack escalated U.S. involvement while Russia came to the side of Assad. Putin most likely supports Assad to maintain its lease of a key geographic asset - a warm-water naval base -while also discouraging internal rebellion. At some point a group of ethnic Kurds in northern Syria succeeded (Putin's fear) and began attacking Assad. But, Turkey started attacking the Kurds! Then in 2014 ISIS broke away from Al Qaeda and started attacking the Kurds and the rebels prompting the U.S. to redirect its focus away from the Assad regime. This has to be the messiest conflict in modern history and is entirely defined by proxy wars. Because the war is so convoluted and complicated, there is no end in sight. The relentless destruction over years has caused millions of refugees to flee to Europe because it is the closest stable place to Syria. This unprecedented wave of migrations will surely transform Europe and cripple Syria in the long run.  
Corey Rogers's curator insight, December 15, 2018 5:18 AM
Syria's war has gotten crazier and crazier and doesn't seem like there is a end in sight. The insane cross fighting between outside countries and the inner working of independence inside Syria itself is still an issue. A local protest has turned into an international fight against top countries of US and Russia.
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100 Great Teaching Images

100 Great Teaching Images | PYP | Scoop.it

"Nature and humankind are both great artists, and when they join forces, amazing masterpieces can be produced. Today Bright Side has collected for you works in which the combined efforts of mother nature and photographic artists have captured magic moments showing the wondrous diversity of modern life and the natural world. Pictured above is the Westerdok District in Amsterdam."

 

Tags: images, art, landscape, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
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Mireia Civís Zaragoza's curator insight, December 29, 2016 2:36 PM
fotos espectaculars
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 9, 2017 7:10 AM
100 Great Teaching Images
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Video: Step Into a Refugee Camp

Video: Step Into a Refugee Camp | PYP | Scoop.it
The Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan is one of the largest Syrian camps in the world. In the fall, we visited the camp live with our audience. Here’s what we heard from the refugees and from you.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 3, 2017 1:35 PM

If you want to humanize the massive refugee crisis, and have lives and stories to connect to statistics, this 11 minute video shows what life is like in a refugee camp, and goes into the hopes, dreams, and life stories of the refugees. 

 

TagsMiddleEast, Jordan, Syria, political, refugees.

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How to Create an Interactive Map with Visme

How to Create an Interactive Map with Visme | PYP | Scoop.it
A step-by-step tutorial on how to create an interactive map with Visme, a free online infographic and presentation tool.

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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, December 13, 2016 8:55 AM
Create your own maps
António Leça Domingues's curator insight, December 19, 2016 11:44 AM
Criar um mapa interativo com Visme.
Bart van Maanen's curator insight, December 19, 2016 3:02 PM
Mooie tool om een kaart van data te voorzien.
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What to Know About Diwali, the Festival of Lights

What to Know About Diwali, the Festival of Lights | PYP | Scoop.it

"Diwali, one of the biggest holidays in Indian culture, is a five-day festival of lights celebrated worldwide by Hindus, Sikhs and Jains. This year, the traditional day of Diwali falls on Oct. 30, though celebrations span the entire week leading up to and following the holiday, which marks the triumph of good over evil."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 31, 2016 8:51 PM

This video provides a good introduction to the incredibly important South Asia holiday of Diwali. 

 

Tags: culture, India, Hinduism, South Asia, festivals.

Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 2018 11:31 PM
Diwali is the Indian festival that lasts 5 days and celebrates the “triumph of good over evil”. The article explains that the holiday is recognized worldwide, the festival is marked by lighting fireworks, and other objects that give off light and has many origins.
Matt Danielson's curator insight, December 12, 2018 7:54 PM
This festival seems interesting and all the different lights must be cool to experience.A nice mix of old cultural celebration with more modern traditions (like gift giving, sweets, etc). 
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Why Children Still Need to Read (and Draw) Maps

Why Children Still Need to Read (and Draw) Maps | PYP | Scoop.it
While many skills have become obsolete in the digital age, map reading remains an important tool for building children's spatial reasoning skills and helping them make sense of our world.

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ApocalypseSurvival's curator insight, March 11, 2016 2:15 PM

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.

ThePlanetaryArchives - BlackHorseMedia - San Francisco's curator insight, March 11, 2016 11:25 PM

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 13, 2016 10:53 AM

Young people need to develop a mental map of their environs and an over-reliance on GPS/mapping apps are no substitute.  When these youth become drivers, they are unprepared to make spatially/navigational decisions because they lack map reading skills.  They might think that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.

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How well do you know the world's countries?

How well do you know the world's countries? | PYP | Scoop.it
The average person's geography skills are fairly poor beyond their region. Test your knowledge of the countries at HowStuffWorks.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 9, 2016 8:58 PM

The questions are more "recall" than "higher order thinking" questions, but this batch of 30 questions is still a fun break from the regular routine. 

 

Tags: trivia, games.

Audrey DeSisto's curator insight, February 9, 2016 9:32 PM

On to geography...

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, February 14, 2016 2:37 AM

Questions...

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Analyzing Maps to Better Understand Global Current Events and History

Analyzing Maps to Better Understand Global Current Events and History | PYP | Scoop.it
In this lesson, we provide strategies to help students accurately interpret maps, and we suggest ways for using current event maps as a tool to better understand both history and what’s going on in the world today.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 22, 2016 3:57 PM

The NY Times learning blog really has some interesting, insightful lessons.  This one looks at using maps to understand culture and history, and how it affects today.  

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 2016 5:44 AM

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 


 


Tagsmapping, K12, scale, location.

Nora Morton's curator insight, October 10, 2016 6:54 PM
A fantastic source on how to use maps in the classrooms and questions to help guide students into further exploration.  Provides numerous links to help understand the background and various types of maps, samples linking history with current events, and tools to create your own maps. 
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100 outstanding interactive maps of 2015

100 outstanding interactive maps of 2015 | PYP | Scoop.it

Tags: K12, map, map archives.
It's time to present the most interesting interactive maps that came to our attention in 2015


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2016 5:58 PM

There is bound to be something that you will find useful/insightful in this year-end list part I and part II).

 

Tags: map, map archives.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, January 23, 2016 9:50 PM

Such a great collection of interactive and beautiful maps, hours of entertainment for the North American APHUG nerdus domesticus.