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Malaysia Airlines Needs to Think Before They Tweet

Malaysia Airlines Needs to Think Before They Tweet | Public Relations & Social Media | Scoop.it
The airline's tweet asked,
Olivia Heller's insight:

The article I found on PR Daily is about Malaysia Airlines, yet again. The article even starts off by saying, “Malaysia Airlines has to be the least self-aware company on the planet.” The airlines Twitter account tweeted the other day, “Want to go somewhere, but don’t know where?” The airline was trying to inspire travellers to utilize the deals the airline has to offer. It did not do that; it actually reminded everyone that they still don’t know where Flight 370 and the 239 passengers ended up. The article ends talking about the importance of self-awareness on social media. It said to really focus on putting yourself in the reader’s position and think about how you would view your company from their view.

 

I decided to apply this back to the Lessons From Amy’s Baking Company article. I applied this reading to the article because clearly Malaysia Airlines needs help running their social media page. First thing, the number five lesson in the article is don’t insult people. Malaysia Airlines insulted a lot of people by that tweet. Although some would say that the tweet was somewhat funny, if one of your family members or loved ones had been on that flight you would definitely not be 1) booking a flight with them and 2) you would not find the tweet humorous. Second thing, the Lessons From Amy’s article also advises to not react right away and to not respond to everyone. Malaysia Airlines was doing both of these things. In the article on PR Daily it shows a tweet from a lady who said, “probably not the best choice of words for an airlines that doesn’t know where one of its planes is- just saying.” Even though Malaysia Airlines wasn’t angry when they were responding to twitter followers, it should have just been removed from their site and a public statement should have been made from their Twitter account letting followers know that they are sorry and it was removed. Another lesson was learn to walk away. The article said, "When facing unwelcome feedback on social media, it’s important to know when to walk away. Not every mention deserves a response, not every blog post about you needs a comment, and not every Reddit thread needs an explanation" (p. 1). I think that Malaysian Airlines needs to just relax with their social media pages. They constantly are caught in trouble with social media!  I think they need to either switch social media managers or maybe not post tweets that they haven't thought through all the way. 

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Kim K didn't #BreakTheInternet but she did get People Talking about her "Assets"

Kim K didn't #BreakTheInternet but she did get People Talking about her "Assets" | Public Relations & Social Media | Scoop.it
I am a woman who writes about the danger of "woman-on-woman bashing." I loathe when we judge other women for their career choices or how and when they choose to have children. So why did I allow myself to be bothered by the nude photos of Kim featured in Paper Magazine [...]
Olivia Heller's insight:

This article written by Carrie Kerpen on Forbes.com was about Kim Kardashian's Paper magazine cover from a few weeks ago. The article begins with a quote from Kim K herself from 2009, when she called herself ambitious and an entrepreneur. The article continues by by talking about Kim's fame, power, influence and how in control of her career she is. But, regardless of whether or not she is in control of her career, women and people everywhere hate her. The article said that most of the negative responses to Kim's Paper magazine cover were from women. Carrie Kerpen, the author, has interviewed multiple women for her podcast and put some of the quotes from women in the article. Carrie asked the women whether or not Kim hurts or helps female leaders. The responses were very negative. However, when she compared it to a branding perspective the women agreed. The article ended with a quote from Kim's interview with Vanity Fair and what Carrie's opinion was. Carrie believes that if her "assets" are what makes her successful then, "Mrs. Kardashian West: You do you!"

 

I thought this article tied back very well with our readings on Miley Cyrus. Kim, just like Miley, is very in control of her career. Miley had done specific things to get people talking and Kim is the same way. Kim along with her sisters posted photos from the Paper magazine shoot on Instagram, knowing that people would immediately react to the photos. In the Forbes article on Miley Cyrus it gives Five PR Secrets of Miley, and I believe that Kim does those things all just as well as Miley.

 

In the Forbes article it says, “Make yourself (or your actual product) a product,” referring to using social media (Wynne, 1). Kim Kardashian or one of her assistants is constantly posting pictures on social media. Not only did Kim and her sisters post the Paper magazine pics themselves, but Kim also took to Twitter to tweet about the shoot. She had tweeted about balancing a glass of champagne on her butt. Obviously making people wonder what she is talking about since she didn’t include a picture in her tweet.

 

Kim also used the other tips from the Forbes article to correlate with her #BreakTheInternet photos. If doing full frontal nudity shots doesn’t scream sex sells then I don’t know what does. Also, it is easy to say that those pictures are very memorable. Not only because she is doing a nude shoot, but also because the photos have been made into so many different memes it’s hard for those photos to not be memorable. Even if you didn’t look up the photos yourself, you’ve seen them because they are everywhere. 

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#AlexFromTarget

#AlexFromTarget | Public Relations & Social Media | Scoop.it
A lowly Target cashier is taking social media by storm. Will the brand be able to boost its PR efforts by capitalizing on the trend? 
Olivia Heller's insight:

I found this article on PR Daily’s website titled, “’Alex from Target’ becomes Internet sensation,” which is about one of the newest trending topics on Twitter. The article is about a boy who works at Target and after someone tweeted a picture of him with the hashtag, ‘alexfromtarget’, he has blown up. There have been Twitter accounts made, meme’s made and the hashtag is trending. It also talks about how this is the perfect timing for Target with the holidays coming up since last year Target had the incident with the data breach. Target is taking advantage of the situation by using the trending hashtag.

 

The reading I related this back to was the PR Secrets of Miley Cyrus. I went through the 5 secrets that the Forbes article discussed. The first one, controversy sells did not apply to Alex from Target. The second one is sex sells; in this case, Alex from Target is in no way trying to be sexy.  But, Alex from Target is an attractive male; in the article it even compares Alex to an early Justin Bieber. The third is to be memorable; Alex doesn’t need a VMA performance to be memorable like Miley, but all the Twitter accounts, memes and good looks will keep him memorable. In the article it states, “Miley has more than 14 million Twitter followers,” (Wynne, 1). Alex has reached 662.6K Twitter followers. Alex from Target has received so much media attention. He was on Ellen just this past week and continues to trend on Twitter. Just like Miley’s VMA performance, Alex will be talked about for a while. The fourth is to use social media; fortunately for Alex and Target, they don’t have to use social media. Everyone is using it for them, like I discussed previously he has been a trending topic on Twitter for about a week. It does help however that maybe the “real” Alex has tweeted about becoming an Internet sensation as well as Target. The last one is publicize your demographic; again, everyone does this for Alex and Target. Creating memes and Twitter accounts for High School and up girls about Alex from Target are targeted spot on. Also, by making the hashtag trend for everyone who has Twitter to see gets people talking about Target and Alex from the part-time Target employee. 

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#ImARepublican Campaign Hijacked?

#ImARepublican Campaign Hijacked? | Public Relations & Social Media | Scoop.it
Like many other promotional hashtags before it, the political message spun out of control almost immediately.
Olivia Heller's insight:

The article I found from PRdaily.com is about a Republican party campaign that has gotten a lot of negative feedback. They were trying to show people that all different types of people can be republicans, not just rich white people. The campaign started using the hashtag, ImARepublican. The campaign even launched a video called "Republicans are People Too." People were responding to the video and tweeting rude comments using the hashtag IAmARepublican. Because they have gotten so much backlash, they have put out another video titled, "Ready To Think Differently?" The video hasn't gotten that many views compared to the first video. So far their campaign is not doing very well.

 

I compared this article to our Corporate Reputation Management and Issues of Diversity reading from week 6. In the reading it states, "Reputation has been widely recognized as a valuable intangible asset for companies that can generate lasting competitive advantage, and from a public relations perspective, of which we both teach and research, scholars have argued that reputation, as a major public relations outcome, interacts with other outcome variables such as trust, credibility, and relationship, to affect public relations efforts' return on expectation and return on investment for organizations" (VanSlette, 472). This republican campaign has received a lot of negative feedback and therefore has a negative reputation. People are viewing the videos and responding with a similar hashtag making fun of the campaign. Reputation is seen as something that is very important to a company. I constantly go off of what I hear about a company or person all the time and that determines if I'm going to shop there or hang out with that person. If they have a bad reputation you don't want to be seen there. The video that the campaign has is not a bad video; there has just always been a negative reputation with people who are republican. So automatically when people say they are republican the bad reputation comes with it. It's very similar to the Abercrombie & Fitch issue. Abercrombie is seen so negative because of what their company has said. Same with republicans, republican parties in the past have said negative things and have stereotyped republicans as rich white people, which is not the case whatsoever. 

 Diversity is another issue mentioned in the Waymer and VanSlette reading, which also ties to this article. The first video they posted shows a very diverse group of people all doing different things showing that anyone can be republican. The video actually reminds me of the Target video we watched during a case study presentation in class. The video campaign was good, they just are getting a lot of negativity on Twitter. In the reading it says, "Organizations must not only seek diverse applicants for their workplaces, but also help to foster an environment that is welcoming, inclusive, and sensitive to diversity" (VanSlette, 474). The "Republicans Are People Too" video does exactly that. It shows that they aren't just all different races or participate in different everyday activities, it is showing that they are welcoming and inclusive. Showing that you are inclusive really rubs people the right way, they want to be feel apart of something and if you aren't welcoming them in they don't want to be included. 
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10 Social Media Time Wasters for Businesses

10 Social Media Time Wasters for Businesses | Public Relations & Social Media | Scoop.it
I started some research on some of the ways people waste time on social media and came across a bunch of articles from the late 2000s discussing whether or not social was a big waste of time for businesses. It’s funny to look back on that time period now; social [...]
Olivia Heller's insight:

In the article, “The 10 Biggest Social Media Time Wasters”, Jayson DeMers goes through 10 ways people waste their time using social media and he also related them to businesses as well. DeMers had conducted research on how people waste their time and came across a lot of articles from 2000 that discussed whether or not businesses should utilize social media.

The first way to waste time is not selecting a focus. Businesses sometimes forget who their target audience is and just start up every single social media account possible. Businesses believe that they are going to get more publicity that way, but if they’re target audience is men and women 40-60 years old then Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter are probably not the social media accounts they need. This is a problem they run into frequently.

Second is not having a strategy. Typically, businesses are trying to do 15 projects all at once. Instead, they should be breaking it down day-by-day and trying to get one big goal done a day.

Not having a schedule is the third time waster. Companies need to have a set schedule of how much time will be sent on social media a day. If a company forgets to post something one day and then tries to make up for it the next day and spends three hours on social media, that’s three hours they could have been doing other work. With a set schedule, social media won’t become a distraction at work.

Fourth is not using the tools available to you. If a company wants to post the same thing on multiple social media accounts, they need to just set up an account with Hootsuite, Sprout Social or Buffer. That way they aren’t wasting time logging into each account and posting.

Using too many tools is the fifth one; this is just referring back to the fourth one really. You don’t want to use too many because it can become a distraction to your work. Companies need to figure out what works best for their company and what is the most simple and stick with that.

Trying to do everything yourself is the sixth time waster. DeMers discusses in this time waster that as social media grows, the tasks you’ll need to complete each day will also increase. With that being said, your company will need more social media presence.  By outsourcing some tasks, it takes some things off of your plate so that your company is accomplishing everything that needs to be done in a day.

Seven, failing to schedule posts in advance. If you aren’t scheduling posts in advance it can put a strain on your workload. People can’t be present on their social media accounts 24-7 so by scheduling postings, it helps keep social media in your business. A lot of times if the social media is becoming “too much” business owners want to get rid of it because they don’t see the positives from it.

Getting caught up in real-time chatter is the eighth one, referring to making your conversations short and focused. Engaging in long conversations with people will keep you from doing your regular tasks for the day.

Letting every notification distract you from your work is the ninth one. Just because people respond to a companies Tweet or something doesn’t mean you have to respond that second. Businesses get caught up doing this and then don’t get anything done the rest of the day because every time a notification pops up, they’re responding. Gloria Mark had conducted research on this and said that when people are distracted they don’t immediately go back to what they were doing. 

The last one is failing to engage with your audience. If you aren’t building relationships with your audience then you are not humanizing your brand. Your company needs to respond to people who have reached out to your company. If you aren’t responding to your customers then you are basically wasting your time having all the social media accounts.

Social media is a very important component of marketing, but you can’t just start up social media accounts without putting some thought into it. Also, you need to be sure to avoid these time wasters.

After reading this article I thought of Klapper’s reinforcement theory. Reinforcement theory “maintains that the media cannot create opinions from scratch, but can be effective in reinforcing existing beliefs and attitudes and encouraging individuals to act on them” (Applying Theory to PR Campaigns, p. 23). I thought of this theory when the article talked about not responding to people on social media. If companies don’t respond to people on social media and don’t post that frequently then people are going to create an opinion about the company.

I also thought of two-way asymmetric because typically businesses that are using social media are using two-way communication. They want to get feedback from their customers, therefore they are posting on social media outlets and responding to their customers and taking in their feedback to make their business better. 

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Chevy's Mistake Turns into Their Next Campaign

Chevy's Mistake Turns into Their Next Campaign | Public Relations & Social Media | Scoop.it
If you tuned into the presentation of the World Series’ MVP award last week, you sat through a minute’s worth of blubbering by Chevrolet spokesman Rikk Wilde as he presented a set of keys to MVP Madison Bumgarner. Stumbling over his lines, Wilde tried to describe the features of the [...]
Olivia Heller's insight:

The article, How Chevy Turned an Epic Fail into a Social Media Success is about how Chevrolet spokesman Rikk Wilde presented a set of keys to MVP Madison Bumgarner at the World Series’ MVP award. As Wilde presented they keys he said, “the truck combines class winning and leading, um, you know, technology and stuff.” Chevy ended up using that as a campaign, putting “Ya know…class leading technology and stuff” everywhere. It became a trending topic very quickly and it gave the company exactly what they were looking for, exposure. In the article it says that Chevy even went ahead and made a commercial including the phrase. The article ended with comparing Chevy to the Oreo commercials during the Super Bowl.

 

I related this article to a couple of articles we read for class, the first being the Red Cross article. I connected the two because Chevy, just like the Red Cross, made a big mistake and fixed it by just going with it. Chevy having their spokesman stumble across his words when presenting a set of keys to someone with a ton of people around clearly wasn’t an ideal situation, and neither was tweeting getting slizzard. Chevy took a bad situation and turned into a good one very quickly. Most companies would have just left it and made a statement with a lame excuse. 

 

I also applied the theories reading from week 2 to this article. The cumulative effects theory on page 19 suggests that, “persuasive campaigns can be most effective when the message comes from a variety of sources and/or is repeated from the same source but over an extended period of time.” Chevy when launching their campaign did not stick to one tactic. As stated in the article, Chevy used social media outlets and commercials. There aren’t very many campaigns today that can get away with trying to use just one platform to get their message across. By using the different social media outlets and making commercials, Chevy’s campaign was a trending topic on Twitter, which is a huge deal. 

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Dave & Buster’s Taco Tuesday Tweet

Dave & Buster’s Taco Tuesday Tweet | Public Relations & Social Media | Scoop.it
The restaurant chain tweeted that ‘no Juan ever’ would say he hates tacos. Followers called the brand out for racism.
Olivia Heller's insight:

This article on prdaily.com is about Dave & Buster's Twitter drama. The article shows a tweet from Dave & Buster's saying "I hate tacos" said no Juan ever #TacoTuesday #DaveandBusters. The article is rather short and really just shows replies to their tweet about their Taco Tuesday special. It also shows their apology tweet and reactions to that tweet as well. 

 

I connected this article back to the Red Cross article. In the Dave & Buster's article, they sent a tweet that they "didn't realize" would get negative feedback. Where as in the Red Cross article it was an accident.  Dave & Buster’s similar to the Red Cross incident, decided to delete their racists Tweet for taco Tuesday and send out an apology. Just like Red Cross, Dave & Buster’s had to stay calm and just immediately send a tweet out assuring their followers that they are aware of what they did and know they were wrong. Dave & Buster’s owned up to their mistake and decided to not let that one mistake bring their company down. Even after all the backlash they got for the original tweet they sent out for their promotion of taco Tuesday, They stayed calm and decided to not act out. They put their customers first, just like Red Cross. Red Cross didn’t want people to think they were a bunch of drunks, so they just sent another tweet out assuring others that everything was fine and it was a common mistake. Which is what Dave & Buster’s did also.

 

I also connected this article back to the Lesson’s From Amy’s Baking Company article. I connected this back to that article because Dave & Buster’s could have responded to each and every one of their Twitter followers and ended up just like Amy’s Baking Company. Instead, they kept their composure and sent an apology tweet following the original. I thought that Dave & Buster’s really utilized the tip from the Forbes article, learn when to walk away, in the article it said, “When facing unwelcome feedback on social media, it’s important to know when to walk away. Not every mention deserves a response, not every blog post needs a comment, and not every Reddit thread needs an explanation” (Clay, 1). Knowing when to walk away from a post in a very important tip for social media, especially for businesses on social media. Dave & Buster’s relaxed and realized they made a mistake and decided to fix what they had done. Unlike Amy’s Baking Company that posted rude comment after rude comment in reply to their followers on their social media outlets, Dave & Buster’s just took care of what they did. 

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'Fat Girl' Costume Section on Wal Marts Website Should Never Have Existed

'Fat Girl' Costume Section on Wal Marts Website Should Never Have Existed | Public Relations & Social Media | Scoop.it
Social media and blogs exploded Monday when word spread that the retail giant had a Halloween section labeled ‘Fat Girl Costumes.’
Olivia Heller's insight:

This article that I found on PR Daily is about how on Wal Mart's website before Halloween, they had a costume section titled, 'Fat Girl Costumes.' People were tweeting about the label and were very angry since that is so offensive. Wal Mart changed the label to, 'Plus Size Costumes,' but it took Wal Mart a week to notice it. Wal Mart then was replying to every single tweet and post from their followers apologizing.

 

I immediately thought of the Applebee's social media incident. I related it to Applebee's because both Applebee's and Wal Mart were copying and pasting to respond to customers. We talked in class about how wrong it is to copy and paste when dealing with a crisis. Wal Mart's head of social media kept responding with the same message, "This never should have been on our site. It is unacceptable, and we apologize. We worked quickly to remove this. -Jes" (Wilson, 1).  In class we also discussed how you don't need to respond to every single person that tweets or posts on Wal Mart, or your companies page. 

 

I also applied the two-way asymmetric theory to this article because in the reading it says that, “Organizations practicing this model gather feedback from their audiences and design appropriate messages than it is to seek areas of common ground and compromise,” (Applying Theory, 18).  Wal Mart took the feedback that they were getting on social media about the ‘Fat Girl Costumes’ section on their website and changed it. They didn’t try to compromise with any of the people tweeting, they simply just removed it from the site.

 

I applied the Image Restoration Theory reading to this article as well because Wal Mart used some of these strategies. Wal Mart used mortification when they replied to tweets by admitting that they were wrong for posting that on their website and that they were held responsible for the act. Wal Mart then asked for forgiveness from their customers and Twitter followers by apologizing and reassuring them that the post was removed from their website. Wal Mart also used a couple of the reducing offensiveness tactics. The first is minimization, Wal Mart tried to reduce the negativity the were receiving online by responding to every single post apologizing and making it seem like what had happened wasn’t that big of a deal. The second is differentiation; Wal Mart attempted to cover up the act by changing the title of the costume section on their website as if it never said anything bad. 

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Men's Health Tweets Women Hate Sports

Men's Health Tweets Women Hate Sports | Public Relations & Social Media | Scoop.it
On Monday evening, Men's Health took a break from busting penis myths to help its readership with another serious problem. As it turns out, women don't like sports. So, if you're a woman who's been masquerading as a sports nut, you can finally just relax. And, if you're a guy whose girlfriend
Olivia Heller's insight:

In this article I found on refinery29.com, Vanessa Golembewski wrote about how on Monday Men's Health Magazine tweeted an article titled, "Most women don't care about stats." Men's Health had received a numerous amount of tweets regarding the article and have since then removed it from their Twitter. The article had said that women don't care about whether or not someone got their 500th touchdown pass, that women care more about a player that has a dramatic storyline. Men's Health also tweeted an apology to their followers. Golembewski also did some research on the author of the article, she found out that the author is not only a girl but she is an intern at Men's Health so clearly it isn't just the girl who wrote the articles fault. Men's Health clearly had an editor review the article before publishing it since she is just an intern. 

 

After reading this article, I thought of the image restoration theory. The assumptions of the image restoration theory are stated in the image restoration article from week 3's readings as, "(1) communication is best thought of as a goal-directed activity and (2) maintaining a positive reputation is one of the central goals" (p. 1). There are different strategies within the image restoration theory. From the Men's Health apology Tweet, they used the evading responsibility strategy. I think that Men's Health used two of the four variations of evading responsibility. The first one is accident, in their apology they had said that the article had "missed the mark" and they have since then deleted the article. In the reading it says that, "Here the accused does not deny that offense occurred, but rather attempts to provide information that may reduce his/her apparent responsibility for the offensive act" (p. 1). Men's Health doesn't deny that they posted the article they just claim that they didn't know it would get such bad feedback, in other words, reducing the responsibility. The second one, motives or intentions which is stated in the reading as, "The wrongful act is not denied, yet the audience is asked not to hold the person fully responsible because it was done with good, rather than evil intentions" (p. 1). Again, with the apology they tweeted that they weren't saying women are inferior to men and that they didn't realize it would get so much negative feedback. 

 

I also saw the active agenda-setting theory used in this article. In the Applying PR Theories to PR Campaigns article from week 2, it says that "Active agenda-setting theory states that the media do in fact tell audiences what to think." I am applying this to the article because Golembewski states in her article what the Men's Health article contained and the fact that it was written by a female intern, therefore jumping to the assumption that Men's Health writers and editors degrade women or think that men are superior to women. Everyone that reads this article will assume that the article Men's Health had posted was in fact being sexist because the media is saying so. 

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Five Important Lessons For Everyone After Celebrity Nude Photo Leak

Five Important Lessons For Everyone After Celebrity Nude Photo Leak | Public Relations & Social Media | Scoop.it
Within hours of the breach today, Twitter announced that it is suspending accounts that share the celebrity nude photos; do you really think that you will get the same treatment?
Olivia Heller's insight:

After the long Labor Day weekend, it was announced that Jennifer Lawrence and a long list of other celebrities’ nude photos had been stolen from their iCloud. There was a mass amount of Twitter accounts sharing the photos as well. Joseph Steinberg sympathizes for those whose accounts were hacked and he also gives five important lessons for everyone that we can learn from this incident.

The first one being that no one knows whether or not the celebrities who were hacked protect their accounts properly, if a weakness was found in iCloud, or if something else happened. Regardless of how the hackers got a hold of the photos, you need to be aware of where you are storing your photos and other private information. Users of iCloud make themselves a target for hackers; hackers know that people utilize iCloud for storing private information and photos. You need to be more aware of what you are storing and where you are storing it. Steinberg says in the article, “Even if a cloud provider is more professional in handling security than you are, be aware that there may be risks and that orders of magnitude more attacks may be launched trying to steal your files from the cloud than from a machine sitting in your house.”

The second lesson is that if you need to store private material you need to encrypt it, and don’t encrypt it through iCloud. Be sure to speak to an expert if you plan to encrypt the files through iCloud. Hackers who are able to breach the provider may also be able to access methods to decrypt the system and therefore, have access to your information.

The third lesson discussed in this article is to be sure to secure any accounts you have. It is really important to have a strong password and strong answers to your security questions as well. If you reuse passwords, a breach at one site can be a breach at another site.

The fourth is that you need to be more careful than a celebrity. Although this sounds silly, it’s true. It is very clear that law enforcement, the media, and technology vendor’s treat leaked material of celebrities very different than if it was an average person. Be cautious that some social media providers will not respond right away and others will respond to your issue. In Jennifer Lawrence and the other celebrities’ cases, Twitter announced just a couple of hours after the breach, that the Twitter accounts that were sharing the photos of the celebrities would be suspended. More than likely, you would not receive the same treatment.

The last lesson is to be sure not to share materials online that you don’t want to be public. Kate Upton is one of the celebrities who were hacked this weekend and had recently done an interview talking about how because of the Internet and social media she would never pose nude for fashion photographers. Once images are stored on the Internet they may remain online forever as soon as they are shared.

We live in such a tech savvy world today that everything we do revolves around social media, technology, and the Internet. It is practically impossible to store information anywhere else but on iCloud or online. It has been released later by Apple, that there was a small part of iCloud that had a flaw in it and allowed for hackers to find the information and exploit it. 

After reading this article, I instantly thought of the readings over image restoration theory. Many of the celebrities whose photos were leaked labor day weekend denied the fact that it was them. Denial is when, "you may deny that an act occurred or that you were not the one who did it; mistaken identity is the idea here" (A Theory of Image Restoration, p. 1). 

We see a lot of celebrities in this situation after they do something negative that receives a lot of media attention. In this article, Jennifer Lawrence and many other celebs used a variety of tactics to reduce offensiveness and they also used denial and evading responsibility. 

Jennifer Lawrence's photos were surfaced all over Twitter and other social media outlets. Her publicist used attacking the accuser tactic. She confirmed that the photos were in fact her and then blamed that her privacy was taken from her and that the authorities would be contacted and that person would be punished. Yes, her privacy was taken but if she is worried about her image she shouldn't have those photos saved anywhere. 

As for other celebs, Victoria Justice for example, has been using denial. Her and many of the other celebrities have been denying that these photos are them. Victoria Justice posted a tweet saying that the photos are not her and that she hasn't taken any nude photos. 

Mary Winstead evaded responsibility by tweeting that the pictures are of her and that she had taken the pictures a long time ago with her husband. By taking full responsibility for the pictures, I feel like it has taken her out of the media spotlight. Instead of denying them or trying to make a huge deal out of the pictures, she admitted it was her and is moving on from it. 

Kate Upton was also one of the many celebrities whose photos were leaked, she had said in an interview done very recently that she would never take nude photos because of the Internet. She claimed that if she were to be photographed the pictures would surface all over the web and she did not want that to happen. Unfortunately, her photos from the cloud were leaked. Her boyfriend was also in the photos who is in the MLB. He has decided to not comment on the photos. Upton on the other hand is responding just like JLaw, attacking the accuser. 

These women have every right to be upset and want to put whoever stole their privacy in jail. But, there is no need to put the blame on someone else. Both of them, as well as all of these celebrities are responsible for having these photos. 

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