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Conference - Initiation aux reseaux sociaux pour l'entreprise

Vidéo de la conférence proposée en ligne le 20/09/2012 par Valérie Payotte, Partenaire Webmarketing http://partenaire-webmarketing.com/blog Découvrez égaleme...

Via Rose Marie DeSousa, Renata Nogueira
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Building a Feedback-Rich Culture

Building a Feedback-Rich Culture | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it
You'll need four key elements.
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Building a Feedback-Rich Culture!! 

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Conference - Initiation aux reseaux sociaux pour l'entreprise

Vidéo de la conférence proposée en ligne le 20/09/2012 par Valérie Payotte, Partenaire Webmarketing http://partenaire-webmarketing.com/blog Découvrez égaleme...

Via Rose Marie DeSousa
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Social Media in Healthcare : We're Getting There But Have a Ways to Go

Social Media in Healthcare : We're Getting There But Have a Ways to Go | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it

The evolution of social media in healthcare seems to be rapidly reaching a tipping point.  There’s no shortage of speakers at hundreds of conferences, and there’s no shortage of activity on twitter elaborating upon many of the potential upsides.  Thousands of physicians now utilize twitter as a means of communicating, sharing, learning, and staying in touch with long lost colleagues and friends.  We follow conference hashtags from afar to stay up to date.  We meet many new and interesting people who share a common goal.  Serendipity and the power of pull enable us to grow our networks, foster our relevance, improve our knowledge base and reach out to assist others. Physicians, nurses, physical therapists, and ATCs are all collaborating and  reaching out to their networks when they are in need of information.  A few healthcare providers are curating content or sharing articles that their colleagues may find useful.  The conversations are occurring far more frequently than in years past. The oncology, and more specifically, the breast cancer physician, nurse, and patient presence/interactions have been nothing short of astounding!


This journey has certainly been far more of a marathon (or long slow walk) than a sprint.  Recognition of the value propositions have come slowly.  Guidance for those on the fence, or those afraid to dip their toes in the water has been slow to emerge, and is often as murky as the water they’re dipping their toes  into.


There are no shortage of physicians and other health care workers who tweet, blog or write about the benefits of social media in healthcare to themselves,  their colleagues and their patients —BUT — far too few healthcare providers have set out to engage the  segment of  the social media audience who most likely stands to benefit the most from what social media in healthcare has to offer : The patient.


Our patients are confused, often ill-informed, scared and very thirsty for knowledge, and a helping hand.  Far too physicians are actually taking the time to address the questions, fears, and apprehensions of a global  audience thirsting for meaningful, actionable and useful healthcare information. We are missing the opportunity to help clear the windshield of doubt.  By utilizing social media in healthcare we can push content, put forth in a manner that is easy to absorb,  easy to understand, easy to put to use,  and addresses most of their basic questions is what this segment of the healthcare social media audience requires most.

Starting a blog, or a website has become far simpler than in years past.  Addressing the questions you receive each and everyday in the office is the best place to start when it comes to content creation.  Keep it short, keep it simple, and keep it targeted.  In time, you will have a web presence full of great content. You will have a site you can be very proud of, and you will develop a very thankful audience who will be more than happy to share the information they have learned — and the provider they have learned it from.

Everybody “wins”.


Via rob halkes
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rob halkes's curator insight, May 20, 2014 9:39 AM

I couldn't agree more, to quote: "There are no shortage of physicians and other health care workers who tweet, blog or write about the benefits of social media in healthcare to themselves,  their colleagues and their patients —BUT — far too few healthcare providers have set out to engage the  segment of  the social media audience who most likely stands to benefit the most from what social media in healthcare has to offer : The patient."

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5 Ways To Prove To Your Boss You Need Content Curation

5 Ways To Prove To Your Boss You Need Content Curation | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it
Have You Made the Business Case For Content Curation? If not, this data will help persuade your management to invest in content curation.

Via Guillaume Decugis
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Emmanuel 'Manny' Gigante's curator insight, July 31, 2014 10:25 PM

NUFF SAID!

J-Philippe Déranlot's curator insight, August 1, 2014 4:36 AM

Voici un billet utile pour qui veut comprendre la curation ... malgré l'inutilité de ce commentaire publié dans un de mes topics Scoop.it ;-)

Barbara Alevras, PMP's curator insight, August 1, 2014 9:43 AM

Some great tips to help you promote the benefits of content curation as a key marketing activity.  Would any of these resonate with your boss?

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Switzerland's Healthcare Explained!

TjSwitzerland! It's a gorgeous alpine nation of 8 million people. It's a parliamentary republic made up of 26 cantons. I've never been, but I hear great things about it. The country should...

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That is worth sharing!! 

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How Care Collaboration Can Lower the Cost of Healthcare Delivery | NaviNet

How Care Collaboration Can Lower the Cost of Healthcare Delivery | NaviNet | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it

It is not news to anyone that healthcare costs are spiraling out of control, threatening to equal more than one third of the U.S economy by 2040. This dilemma is everyone’s problem: the government, health plans, employers, physician offices, and patients. In a survey of 1,400 chief financial officers in a stratified random sample of U.S. companies, healthcare costs ranked as the number-one concern.

2012 | Laura McCaughey

 

Quote:

The care collaboration model embodies a team approach to healthcare. It includes the health plan sponsor, the physician office, and the employer as part of the patient’s care team, along with the physician acting as quarterback, managing specialists, procedures, and all aspects of care. This effective care leadership team—including the new team member, the care coordinator—is essential to achieving success in clinical care outcomes and engaging the patient to ensure compliance with a given treatment plan. And
the right technological solution can enable all parties to contribute to better outcomes.


Download document here

 

 


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rob halkes's curator insight, August 14, 2014 11:22 AM

Great stuff to read: Opinions and approaches lead to integrated care.


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Beyond the Buzz: Healthcare Social Media | HealthWorks Collective

Beyond the Buzz: Healthcare Social Media | HealthWorks Collective | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it
In my new column, "Beyond the Buzz," learn not only how to use social media in healthcare, but how to do it exceptionally well.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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What is Public Health?

For more information on Public Health click on links below: Faculty of Public Health: http://www.fph.org.uk Public Health England: https://www.gov.uk/governm...
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Making health achievable for everyone... 

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Meet Google Drive – One place for all your files

Meet Google Drive – One place for all your files | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it
Google Drive is a free way to keep your files backed up and easy to reach from any phone, tablet, or computer. Start with 15GB of Google storage – free.
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Integrated Care organisations 

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Who Will Pay For Proactive Medicine?

Who Will Pay For Proactive Medicine? | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it
Intensive primary care, a key form of proactive medicine, can produce big benefits to both healtcare costs and health status, but it requires upfront investment. Government and insurers are slow to invest here. More/better data and a systems view of healthcare are needed to capture this opportunity.
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Conférence - Veille et Curation au service de votre entreprise

Vidéo de la conférence proposée en ligne le 25/10/2012 par Valérie Payotte, Partenaire Webmarketing http://partenaire-webmarketing.com/blog Découvrez égaleme...

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Transforming Healthcare Using An E-Commerce Model

Transforming Healthcare Using An E-Commerce Model | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it

Girish Navani wants to do for healthcare what Amazon.com AMZN -0.56% did for e-commerce.

His company, eClinicalWorks, develops information technology to connect doctors, patients and insurance companies to make healthcare more efficient and consumer-friendly.

“Technology can be a catalyst to completely transform care at the delivery side by making it far more streamlined, prevent errors, avoid duplicates and make access to information better,” says Navani, CEO of the Westborough, Mass.-based company.

“The fascinating part is if you accomplish that, then the patient can actually become a consumer of care,” he adds.

Navani is quick to point out that healthcare is a complicated and heavily regulated industry, so the process won’t be as easy or quick as what Amazon did for online commerce. But eClinicalWorks is still growing rapidly.

Girish Navani, Co- Founder and CEO, eClinicalWorks

The company’s electronic health records system now handles one million doctor visits every day, or about 22 percent of the U.S. total.

“The reason you don’t hear as much about it is because we do a lot of work with many different customers,” Navani says. “Many times they’re small practices.”

The company also has a consumer-oriented subsidiary called healow.com (for Health and Online Wellness), which allows patients to communicate with doctors online without having to visit the office. There are now about 25 million patients using the service, which even has a smart-phone app.

The healow service allows you to link to your own doctors as well as doctors treating family members, such as an elderly parent.

“It’s not just access to information,” Navani explains. “We are coming out with telemedicine in October so you could do a video-type televisit. So if you’re in rural Colorado and your doctor is 40 miles away, you could (go online) and say ‘Doc, this visit is a follow-up to my chronic condition. Your nurse and I will just go over the meds, the nutrition and my weight and how I’m doing.’ “

Navani also envisions a day when patients can actually shop for doctor services the way people do for hotels on Priceline.

“In healthcare, you and I can’t go and ask the question: ‘Who’s available to do an MRI today?’ We’ve launched that capability a year ago for doctors and we’re expanding that now to dentists and to MRIs.”

Not only will the service benefit patients, Navani believes, but it will help medical facilities use their resources more efficiently.

“There are some specialists who loved this because they were looking for new patients every day,” he explains. “Then there are primary-care doctors who tell me how ‘I’m full. I don’t have time.’ And then I just remind them, ‘You know, yesterday you had three cancellations and you couldn’t (rebook) them.’”

Part of the key to eClinicalWorks’ success is that the company isn’t beholden to Wall Street or outside investors, Navani says. All the profit the company makes is plowed back into operations and hiring. The company now has 4,000 employees, all of whom get profit-sharing and health care coverage with zero deductibles.

“I think it’s been shown time and time again that that’s truly what most want – a purpose that’s bigger than dollars,” Navani says. “Yes, they want a better life. They want to provide for their families, but a purpose in life is much more valuable.”

Navani stumbled into healthcare after taking tech jobs at Teradyne, Fidelity Investments and Aspen Technology. He listened to a lecture in Geneva in 1999 about using wireless computing in healthcare, and it struck a nerve.

“The whole idea of the doctor and the patient sitting like this and using a tablet versus paper charts—the picture was just too big to let go,” he recalls. “So I have one slide from ’99 called “The Connected Office,” with the doctor in the middle, the patient sitting here, the insurance company sitting there, the lab, the diagnostic imaging, his employer. And then someday we’ll build technology that connects every one of them and it will make healthcare so amazingly faster and better.”

eClinicalWorks does minimal marketing and relies on word of mouth to expand its business.

“The largest hospital system in the country, HCA, uses us for its doctors and we got them through a word-of-mouth relationship,” Navani says. “We got some amazing deals. We’re doing business with a large international client now that has a presence in 70 countries. We got that through word-of-mouth. So I think the model is just stay patient and grow.”

Navani is grateful to the U.S. for giving him the opportunity to develop his business, which he calls the “dream of an immigrant.”

“You get a chance and you do it,” he says. “And now you find a way to return something.”

Navani also credits his parents, who instilled in him the desire to work hard and have goals.

“You get taught those things every day,” he says. “And I really found a way to transfer that to my own kids, who understand that you don’t measure success by the bank account or the company’s worth. You make goals and once you reach them you reset. I think I have found a goal in healthcare I can reset for the rest of my life and never reach the end of it.”

 

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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[Health 2.0] uMotif Gives Chronic Illness Patients an Active Role in their own Treatment | L'Atelier: Disruptive innovation

[Health 2.0] uMotif Gives Chronic Illness Patients an Active Role in their own Treatment | L'Atelier: Disruptive innovation | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it

The tool developed by London-based uMotif enables patients suffering from serious, long-term illness to monitor their own condition and also gives them exercises to do, reducing much of the to-and-fro between doctor and patient.


Via Olivier Janin, adhelt
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Panos Bamidis's curator insight, November 27, 2013 8:17 PM

very interesting self-management tool...

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Why Switzerland Has the World's Best Health Care System - Forbes

Why Switzerland Has the World's Best Health Care System - Forbes | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it
Our discussion of health care reform should start by compiling a set of bipartisan goals for an alternative health-care system: one in which everyone has access to affordable, fiscally stable, high-quality health care.

Via #BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q
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Reforming Healthcare in Europe - The Need to Transform the Medtech Model in Europe

Reforming Healthcare in Europe - The Need to Transform the Medtech Model in Europe | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it

Pressure is rising in Europe and will force the medical-technology (medtech) industry to fundamentally change how it operates.

CHALLENGES ON A NUMBER OF FRONTS

The outlook for medtech in Europe is deteriorating as pricing pressure mounts, competition intensifies, and payers demand clear evidence of the cost-benefit tradeoff for products.

COMPANIES MUST OPTIMIZE THE EXISTING BUSINESS

Medtech companies need to make the most of their current operations by taking steps to transform their commercial model, prove the clinical and economic value of products, and improve their cost structure.

CHANGING THE PLAYING FIELD

Medtech companies must also reinvent how and where they compete—an effort that includes innovating differently, expanding to adjacent markets, and exploring the “value” segment.

 

See BCG report here

 


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rob halkes's curator insight, August 21, 2014 5:45 AM

Great Insight originated by Medtech Europe about the need for change of Healthcare in Europe specifically looking for value based innovation! Inspiring read. Look at the executive summary of the Economist Report here

 

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Study: How Patients Want to Communicate with Their Doctors

Study: How Patients Want to Communicate with Their Doctors | Public Health and Management | Scoop.it
Do patients want to use patient portal software? We surveyed 430 patients who had seen their primary care physician within the last year to find out.

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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, August 20, 2014 5:28 AM

Phone first (makes sense when it comes to health discussion); and online going strong (when it comes to admin tasks..)